Category Archives: Canadian Forces

Captain William Hall White K.C. – UPDATED

I happened to find a small biography book on this gentleman. He was quite a character and an adventurer. He was not afraid to go where not too many Canadians of his generation went. He lived by the definition of a “true adventurer” The book is available at Shoreline Press.

Captain William Hall White served with the Battleford Column during the military expedition against Louis Riel and with Canadian Army Pay Corps during World War One. He is entitled to the North West Campaign Medal and the British War Medal.

He was born on April 29th, 1856 in Hamilton, Ontario. He had 9 brothers and sisters.

He entered Upper Canada College in 1873. He went to the University of Toronto and was called at the Bar in 1882 and then he headed to Winnipeg. He invested in the real estate booming there but lost all his money. He then moved to Brandon, Manitoba where he arrived on April 2nd, 1882.

He had received a land grant for a piece of land near Piles O’Bones River which later would become Regina. Arriving there on May 20th, 1882, he though his land was not the greatest one and moved to another place. The land he was granted was to be sold for 1 000 000 $ in 1898.

He was named Chief Commissioner of the Board of Commerce of Canada

William White 1881

Whitte 1881

North West Campaign 1885

On May 24th 1885 he left his partnership in his law firm and enlisted with the Battleford Column in Birtle, Manitoba. He was appointed a Major. His residence was in Ottawa and he claimed his medal on April 2nd. The Battleford Column was part of the Birtle Infantry Company. The unit was composed of 46 members and their mission was to bring supply to Colonel Otter’s force.

Battleford Column

Battleford Column

He married Frances Cholerton on March 23rd, 1884 in the North West Territories

1886: He was appointed Census Commissioner for the Provisional District of Eastern Assiniboine (south Saskatchewan)

1887: He was appointed crown Prosecutor for nine towns in Saskatchewan

He moved to Slocan City, British Columbia in 1897 and just after 6 months moved to Victoria.

His son Richard White was born on December 5th, 1893

His daughter Phyllis Maude was born on February 14th, 1896 in Winnipeg Canada.

He was a candidate for the 1898 provincial election in the Revelstoke District against James L. Kellie, he lost by just a few votes.

After a business trip to London, he was sent to Dawson City to investigate the action of the local manager of the trading and Exploring Company, a British based company which was doing some mining and merchandizing in Yukon.

He moved to Skagway Alaska in March of 1899. He lived in the Klondike for 5 years.

According to the 1901 census he was in Unorganized territories (Steamers) “Canadian, Selkirk, Nora” (Yukon), while his family was in Toronto Ward No. 4, York West, Ontario

He left the Klondike in the fall of 1904 and moved back to Vancouver, British Columbia

World war one

His address: «The Angela» Victoria, British Columbia. He was a lawyer in Yukon, his medical file mention of his semi-sedentary life.

Spouse: Frances Louisa White            Address: 129 Westbourne Terrace, London West , England

Trade: barrister at law             Religion: Church of England     Status: divorced

Height: 5′ 5″      Eyes: grey       Hair: grey         Weight: 170 lbs.

May 23rd, 1916: He enlisted in Victoria, British Columbia in the 143rd battalion (Railway construction

Battalion) as a Paymaster Officer with the Canadian Army Pay Corps. He was named Honorary Captain.

Captain William White in his WW1 uniform with his North West Campaign ribbon

photo

February 17th, 1917: Sailed from Canada on board the ship SS Southland, he arrived in England on February 27th.

March 23rd: He was transferred to the 24th Reserve battalion

March 5th to the 19th: He was hospitalized for bronchitis at the Military Hospital in Purfleet

May 20th: He ceased to be attached to the 24th Reserve Battalion

May 2nd: He was taken on strength with the 1st Canadian Reserve Battalion

June 7th: All paymasters with the C.E.F. who have been gazetted to hold honorary rank are granted temporary rank from the original date of their honorary rank. (London Gazette 30118)

September 20th: Ceased to be attached to the 1st Canadian Reserve battalion

September 25th: Transferred as a paymaster at the 4th Canadian General Hospital at Basingstoke.

He was hospitalized from the 10th to 27th of January 1918 at the 4th Canadian General Hospital at Basingstoke for asthma cause by bronchitis.

He was hospitalized from the 14th to the 17th of February at the Canadian Red Cross Officer Hospital in London West (17 North Audley Street) for bronchitis.

July 15th: 5 days leave

February 18th, 1919: Sent to Canada to be a paymaster. Arrived in Canada on February 21st. Transferred at the #2 District Depot (Toronto) Canadian Army Pay Corps, he was posted there until June 10th 1919.

He was transferred to Clearing station Service Command in Quebec where he was posted from June 11th to August 20th, 1919.

He was demobilized on August 20th.

His son-in-law, James Stanley Beatty, received the DFC during WW1

He died on at the age on June 1st, 1948 in Toronto. He was survived by his wife, France, who died on August 7th, 1956. She was the last officer spouse of a Riel Campaign veteran who was still receiving a pension cheque at that time.

Warrant-Officer Francis John Waddel

Warrant-Officer Francis John Waddel served with Canadian Army Ordinance Corps during World War One. He is entitled to the British War medal, Army Meritorious Service Medal and Permanent Forces of the Empire Beyond the Seas Long Service and Good Conduct Medal.

He was born on May 1, 1882 in Chatham, Kent, England.

He enlisted with the Canadian Ordnance Corps on July 19, 1912 at Halifax, Nova Scotia. He named his next-of-kin as his mother, Winifred Waddell of Chatham, England, stating that he had 8 years’ previous military service with the Army Ordnance Corps (May 1903 to May 1911), that he was not married and that his trade was that of Soldier.

He was appointed Lance Corporal on October 1, 1914, leaving for service in England shortly thereafter and was taken on strength from Canada at Ashford, Kent, England on February 1, 1915.

Eighteen days later, he signed his CEF Attestation Paper with the Canadian Ordnance Corps on February 19, 1915 at Salisbury, England.

He was promoted the following month, to Corporal on March 1st and re-engaged for a further period of three years’ general service with the Canadian Ordnance Corps at Ashford, Kent on July 19, 1915.

He was promoted to Staff Sergeant on October 1, 1915, to Staff Sergeant on February 2, 1916, Sergeant on April 1, 1916 and to Squadron Quartermaster Sergeant on June 1, 1916.

He proceeded to Liphook on command for temporary duty on July 20, 1916, later on command at Crowborough from November 15 to 17, 1916, then proceeded to Pluckley on command from January 19 to 29, 1917, before returning to No. 1 Detachment Canadian Ordnance Corps at Ashford.

He was granted permission to marry Edith Randall on April 26, 1917 at Ashford. Together they had two children: Francis William who was born on May 15, 1918 while at Ashford, the other is unnamed in his records.

He was to be Acting Sub Conductor (Warrant Officer, Class I) with pay and allowances on February 4, 1918 and signed his Re-Engagement Paper on July 22, 1918, re-engaging for three years’ service at Ashford, Kent, later being named Acting Conductor on August 1st.

He was transferred from No. 1 Detachment at Ashford and was placed on command to No. 2 Detachment at Ashford on May 21, 1919.

He was awarded his Meritorious Service Medal, in recognition of valuable service rendered in connection with the war on June 13, 1919. He ceased to be on command at No. 2 Detachment on rejoining No. 1 Detachment Canadian Ordnance Corps at Liphook on June 18th. He was then placed on command to No. 7 Detachment COC at Witley on June 23rd, saw a promotion to Staff Sergeant on August 18th, then struck off strength of No. 7 Detachment to No. 2 Canadian Ordnance Corps at Liphook on December 31st.

Waddell was struck off strength to No. 1 Detachment Canadian Ordnance Corps at London on February 1, 1920 and by the end of the month, was struck off strength of No. 1 COC on transfer to Canada and attached to the CEF in England on February 29th.

The following day, he was taken on strength from the Overseas Military Forces of Canada at London on March 1st to overseas detachment. He was to remain in England for next six months, before being struck off strength of the overseas detachment to Canada for further duty, embarking on the S.S. Grampian and arriving in Canada on September 29, 1920 and was discharged in Ottawa on October 1st, stating his proposed residence as Halifax, Nova, Scotia. He never went to France so he is not entitled to the Victory Medal.

He signed his Permanent Force of Canada Attestation Paper with the 6th Detachment of the Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps at Halifax on October 15, 1920.

He was listed as Category A (General Service). He saw a provisional promotion to Squadron Quartermaster Sergeant at Halifax on November 20th, then reverted to the rank of Staff Sergeant on August 1, 1921.

He was discharged on July 18, 1922 as a Staff Sergeant at Halifax, “In consequence of his service being no longer required”, with his conduct noted as “Exemplary”.

For his long service, Waddell was awarded the Permanent Forces of the Empire Beyond the Seas Long Service and Good Conduct Medal.

He and his wife later moved back to England, settling in Ashford where he died on January 26, 1979, at Ashford, County Kent, at the age of 96, his death attributed to a combination of cardiac failure in conjunction with myocardial degeneration, along with carcinoma of his bladder. He had also been diagnosed with senility and dementia.

Private Frederick Thomas Charlton

Private  Frederick Thomas Charlton served in the 2nd battalion (Ottawa) with the Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War One. He is entitled to the British War Medal and the Victory medal.

He was born on April 29 1897 in Eastman, London, England

He enlisted on September 23rd 1914 in Valcartier, Quebec in the 2nd battalion G company. (He was a minor)

Trade : tanner

Religion : Church of England  Status : single

Height : 5′ 8″  Weight : 136 lbs

Eyes : blue Hair : brown

Name of the mother : Alfred Charlton Address : Whitby, Ontario

He embarked on SS Cassandrian in Quebec City, Quebec on September 30th, 1914. The ship arrived in Gaspe Basin on October 2nd. They departed on October 4th. They arrived in England on October 15th. Arrived on Salisbury Plain on October 25th.

November 14th:The 2nd battalion is inspected by the King. They did drill, physical training and musket training. They began to practice attack at regimental level around mid-December.

February 4th, 1915 : The 2nd battalion is inspected by the King.

February 7th : The battalion proceeded to Amesbury. They arrived in Avenmouth on the 8th. And then embarked on the SS Blackwell

February 11th : They disembarked in St Nazaire, France. They Arrived in Armentieres on February 17th.

February 22nd : He was hospitalized for ulcer at a toe (probably because of too much marching)

August 3rd : He was transferred to the 2nd battalion and joined the unit on the 7th.

August 31st : He was wounded in the field (probably by a sniper). He was transferred to the Casualty Clearing Station on September 1st “While digging trenches was hit in right side of the chest by a rifle bullet. He was in hospital about 2 ½ months”

October 1st : He was transferred to England

He was declared medically unfit on January 6th, 1916. He sailed to Canada on SS Missanabe on the next day

March 25th : He was admitted to the Central military Convalescent hospital

April 3rd : His father enlisted in the 182nd battalion (868093)

He enlisted a second time in the Royal Canadian Dragoon on September 29th, 1916 in Toronto, Ontario (number 550284). It was not rare to see someone enlisting a second after being discharged or refused to serve.

September 30th : He embarked on SS Missanabe and arrived in England on October 13th.

May 5th, 1917 : He was transferred to the Eastern Ontario Regiment (Depot regiment)

April 19th, 1918 : He was granted permission to marry to Adelaide Charlton

December 5th : He embarked on the H.M.T. Minnedosa and arrived in St John New Brunswick on December 14th.

He was discharged on January 15th, 1919

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Corporal Kenneth Michael Germaine

Corporal Kenneth Michael Germaine served with the Princess Patricia Canadian Light Infantry during the period of the Cold War. He served with the United Nations in the Sinai Desert and in Israel. He is entitled to the United Nations Emergency Force Middle East Medal Sinai desert, United Nations Disengagement Observation Force Medal Israel/Syria and the Canadian Forces Decoration.

He enlisted into 3rd battalion Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry in Esquimalt, British Columbia on April 24th 1972.

He started serveing in Cyprus on November 9th 1975

He was back in Esquimalt, British Columbia on May 9th 1976

The mission was established in June 1974 to supervise the cease-fire between Israel and Syria; to supervise the disengagement (redeployment) of Syrian and Israeli forces; and, to establish a buffer zone, as provided in the Agreement on Disengagement between Israeli and Syrian Forces of 31 May 1974. The Mission continues to perform its functions effectively with the cooperation of the parties.

He was posted in Baden, Germany with 3rd Royal Canadian Regiment on September 6th 1976

He was posted in Gagetown, New Brunswick on July 14th 1980.

He was posted in Alert, Canada on March 20th 1991.

He was discharged on February 1st 1993

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Corporal Kenneth Michael Germaine medals

Germaine 1

Private John McLeod

Private John McLeod served with the Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War one. He is entitled to the 1914-15 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal.

Typical WW1 medasl trio

Brewer-H

He was born on October 11, 1883 in Stornoway, Scotland.

He enlisted with the 48th Infantry Battalion on March 31, 1915 in Victoria, British Columbia, he named his next-of-kin as his father, J. McLeod of Stornoroy.

He stated that he had previous military service with the 88th Regiment, Victoria Fusiliers, that he was not married and that his trade as that of Blacksmith.

The 48th Battalion sailed July 1, 1915 aboard the R.M.S. Grampian, arriving in England on July 10th.

He was transferred to the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles Brigade on October 15, 1915 for service in the French theatre and placed with the 4th Canadian Mounted Rifles on January 2, 1916 in France. McLeod was wounded at the Battle of St. Eloi, suffering severe shrapnel wounds to his right forearm and admitted to No. 4 General Hospital at Camiers on April 11th. After three days, he was invalided wounded to England on the 14th and admitted to Kitchener Hospital in Brighton on the 15th, then transferred to the Canadian Division Convalescent Hospital, Woodcote Park at Epsom on June 8th.

After two months hospitalization in France and England, he was discharged on July 12th and transferred to the 35th Reserve Battalion. He saw another transfer, this time to the Canadian Machine Gun Depot at Crowborough on August 13, 1916, before being transferred to the Machine Gun Pool on February 7, 1917.

He arrived in France the following day and joined his new unit, the 13th Machine Gun Company in the field on the 14th. He was wounded at Vimy, suffering shrapnel wounds to both arms and shrapnel fragments in his left knee on May 3, 1917. He was admitted to No. 10 Stationary Hospital at St. Omer on May 5th, subsequently invalided to England one week later, and admitted to Military Hospital at Bagthorpe, Nottingham on May 12th. After two months treatment, he was transferred to the Canadian Convalescent Hospital, Bearwood at Wokingham on July 14th, then discharged four weeks later on August 11th and posted to the 3rd Canadian Command Depot at Hastings. The knee continued to bother McLeod, as fragments remained embedded in his knee. He was admitted to the Canadian Military Hospital at Eastbourne on August 30th, where an attempt was made to rectify the situation. A month later, he was discharged on September 29th and returned to the 3rd Canadian Command Depot.

On January 1, 1918 he was posted to the Canadian Machine Gun Depot . In his Proceedings of a Medical Board document, dated April 18, 1918 at Seaford, Sussex, it noted the fragments of shrapnel in his left knee that were causing swelling and tenderness, with the doctor noting that McLeod “complains of pain in the left knee”. In another report, it noted that there was a “foreign body in (his) left knee joint” on November 18, 1918 and that he was somehow declared “Fit for Duty”. McLeod was attached to the Canadian Discharge Depot at Buxton for return to Canada, sailing on December 7, 1918 and later taken on strength at District Depot, Military District No. 11 in Vancouver, British Columbia.

In his Medical History of an Invalid, dated January 16, 1919 at New Westminster, British Columbia, it was noted that there was a “Foreign body in (the) left knee joint causing slight pain and stiffness in (the) joint.” It was recommended the he declared “Medically unfit.”

It also stated that he was now married to Mary McLeod of Vancouver. He was discharged by reason of “Medical Unfitness” on January 29, 1919 at District Depot, Military District No. 11 in Vancouver, British Columbia, credited with having served in France with the 4th Canadian Mounted Rifles.

He died on January 14, 1950, at the age of 66

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Private Josaphat Delisle

Private Josaphat Delisle served with the 3rd Pioneer Battalion with the Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War One. He is entitled to the British War Medal and Victory Medal.

British War medal and Victory Medal

Bourne-M

He was born on April 3, 1891 in Valleyfield, Quebec.

He signed his Attestation Paper with the 57th Regiment, Canadian Engineers on September 27, 1915 in Montreal, Quebec, at the age of 24, naming his next-of-kin as his wife, Sarah Belduc (probably Bolduc) Delisle of Longueuil, Quebec.

He stated that he had no previous military service, that he was married.

His trade was that of Auto Mechanic. Three days later, he was transferred to the 41st Battalion “Canadiens Francais” on September 30th. The Battalion sailed October 18th aboard the S.S. Saxonia, arriving in England on October 28, 1915.

Three weeks later, he was sentenced to Field Punishment No. 1 for being absent without leave at parade at Bramshott, forfeiting one days’ pay, on November 12th.

He was transferred to the 3rd Canadian Pioneer Battalion on February 19, 1916, landing in France three weeks later, on March 9th. He was nine days in the French theatre, on March 18th, when he suffered a gunshot (shrapnel) wound to his right elbow at Ypres. He was admitted to No. 1 Canadian Field Ambulance, and then transferred to No. 1 Casualty Clearing Station the same day. The following day, he was transferred to No. 2 Canadian Stationary Hospital, where the “Shrapnel (was) removed.

He did endure a fever from the 20th to the 26th, spiking on the 22nd at almost 104 F but eventually it subsided. On March 27th, he was invalided to England aboard the Hospital Ship Cambria, where he was transferred to King George’s Hospital, Stamford St., London on the 28th, taken on strength at the Canadian Casualty Assembly Centre at Folkestone on April 4th.

After five weeks at King George’s Hospital, he was transferred to the Grand Duchess George of Russia Hospital at Harrogate on May 3, 1916, where he was to spend the next five months, before being transferred again, this time to the 2nd Northern General Hospital at Leeds on October 15th, for an additional month’s hospitalization. He was subsequently transferred to the Canadian Convalescent Hospital, Woodcote Park at Epsom on November 16, 1916. In his Medical Report of an Invalid, dated December 9, 1916 at Epsom, it confirmed that he was injured at Ypres on “17.3.16 (when) shrapnel struck him on right elbow, shattering the joint, that he was “wounded on active service in the presence of the enemy”. It was recommended that he be invalided to Canada, his general health declared to be “good”. Although his early operation consisted of “washing out (of the) wound & removal of (the) shrapnel”, his disability was determined to be “permanent”, that the extent of his capacity for earning a full livelihood in the general labour market lessened at present to “1/2 permanently. Evidence in (his) papers of infection in (the) wound, forearm fixed in position, midway between pronation and supination. Elbow solidly fixed at right angles. Right arm involved.” He was discharged December 19th and placed on command to the Canadian Convalescent Depot at Hastings on December 22nd. He ceased to be attached to the CCD and was struck off strength at Buxton for Canada, on January 13, 1917.

Three days later, he embarked Liverpool aboard the S.S. Northland on January 16th. In his Proceedings of a Medical Board at Discharge Depot Report, dated January 26, 1917 at Quebec City, Quebec, it was noted that his elbow was fixed at a 90 degree angle, that his degree of incapacity was as 30% and that the condition was permanent. It rendered him permanently unfit for military service, and that an “operation, special treatment or the use of appliances, etc., to lessen incapacity” was approved.

He was discharged from the Army on March 2nd and his pension was granted the following day. Almost nine months went by and Delisle re-attested with the 3rd Canadian Pioneer Battalion, signing his second Attestation Paper on November 30, 1917 at Montreal, naming his wife, Sarah, as his next-of-kin, stating that he had previous military service with the 41st Battalion CEF, that he was married and that his trade was that of Mechanic.

He also stated that he had previously been discharged as “Medically Unfit” due to a shrapnel wound to his right elbow. Three weeks later, while at Military District No. 4 Depot in Montreal, he was admitted to Grey Nuns Convalescent Home at Montreal on December 18th. It noted that about November 26th, that Delisle had “noticed pain and swelling below (the) elbow.”

In his Medical History of an Invalid, dated January 4, 1918 at Montreal, it stated that he had three visible scars, the third of which was at the “site of (the) incision for draining of an abscess, developed about three weeks ago. It was recommended that he be declared Category “E” (unfit for service )

He was discharged from Grey Nuns Convalescent Home on January 12, 1918 and put on outpatient status. Ten days later, he was discharged from the Army again, on January 22, 1918 at Montreal.

As he was declared Class 3, his pension was granted on March 3, 1917.

served with the 3rd Pioneer Battalion with the Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War One. He is entitled to the British War Medal and Victory Medal.

He was born on April 3, 1891 in Valleyfield, Quebec.

He signed his Attestation Paper with the 57th Regiment, Canadian Engineers on September 27, 1915 in Montreal, Quebec, at the age of 24, naming his next-of-kin as his wife, Sarah Belduc (probably Bolduc) Delisle of Longueuil, Quebec.

He stated that he had no previous military service, that he was married.

His trade was that of Auto Mechanic. Three days later, he was transferred to the 41st Battalion “Canadiens Francais” on September 30th. The Battalion sailed October 18th aboard the S.S. Saxonia, arriving in England on October 28, 1915.

Three weeks later, he was sentenced to Field Punishment No. 1 for being absent without leave at parade at Bramshott, forfeiting one days’ pay, on November 12th.

He was transferred to the 3rd Canadian Pioneer Battalion on February 19, 1916, landing in France three weeks later, on March 9th. He was nine days in the French theatre, on March 18th, when he suffered a gunshot (shrapnel) wound to his right elbow at Ypres. He was admitted to No. 1 Canadian Field Ambulance, and then transferred to No. 1 Casualty Clearing Station the same day. The following day, he was transferred to No. 2 Canadian Stationary Hospital, where the “Shrapnel (was) removed.

He did endure a fever from the 20th to the 26th, spiking on the 22nd at almost 104 F but eventually it subsided. On March 27th, he was invalided to England aboard the Hospital Ship Cambria, where he was transferred to King George’s Hospital, Stamford St., London on the 28th, taken on strength at the Canadian Casualty Assembly Centre at Folkestone on April 4th.

After five weeks at King George’s Hospital, he was transferred to the Grand Duchess George of Russia Hospital at Harrogate on May 3, 1916, where he was to spend the next five months, before being transferred again, this time to the 2nd Northern General Hospital at Leeds on October 15th, for an additional month’s hospitalization. He was subsequently transferred to the Canadian Convalescent Hospital, Woodcote Park at Epsom on November 16, 1916. In his Medical Report of an Invalid, dated December 9, 1916 at Epsom, it confirmed that he was injured at Ypres on “17.3.16 (when) shrapnel struck him on right elbow, shattering the joint, that he was “wounded on active service in the presence of the enemy”. It was recommended that he be invalided to Canada, his general health declared to be “good”. Although his early operation consisted of “washing out (of the) wound & removal of (the) shrapnel”, his disability was determined to be “permanent”, that the extent of his capacity for earning a full livelihood in the general labour market lessened at present to “1/2 permanently. Evidence in (his) papers of infection in (the) wound, forearm fixed in position, midway between pronation and supination. Elbow solidly fixed at right angles. Right arm involved.” He was discharged December 19th and placed on command to the Canadian Convalescent Depot at Hastings on December 22nd. He ceased to be attached to the CCD and was struck off strength at Buxton for Canada, on January 13, 1917.

Three days later, he embarked Liverpool aboard the S.S. Northland on January 16th. In his Proceedings of a Medical Board at Discharge Depot Report, dated January 26, 1917 at Quebec City, Quebec, it was noted that his elbow was fixed at a 90 degree angle, that his degree of incapacity was as 30% and that the condition was permanent. It rendered him permanently unfit for military service, and that an “operation, special treatment or the use of appliances, etc., to lessen incapacity” was approved.

He was discharged from the Army on March 2nd and his pension was granted the following day. Almost nine months went by and Delisle re-attested with the 3rd Canadian Pioneer Battalion, signing his second Attestation Paper on November 30, 1917 at Montreal, naming his wife, Sarah, as his next-of-kin, stating that he had previous military service with the 41st Battalion CEF, that he was married and that his trade was that of Mechanic.

He also stated that he had previously been discharged as “Medically Unfit” due to a shrapnel wound to his right elbow. Three weeks later, while at Military District No. 4 Depot in Montreal, he was admitted to Grey Nuns Convalescent Home at Montreal on December 18th. It noted that about November 26th, that Delisle had “noticed pain and swelling below (the) elbow.”

In his Medical History of an Invalid, dated January 4, 1918 at Montreal, it stated that he had three visible scars, the third of which was at the “site of (the) incision for draining of an abscess, developed about three weeks ago. It was recommended that he be declared Category “E” (unfit for service )

He was discharged from Grey Nuns Convalescent Home on January 12, 1918 and put on outpatient status. Ten days later, he was discharged from the Army again, on January 22, 1918 at Montreal.

He was declared Class 3, his pension was granted on March 3, 1917.

AsIf you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Staff-Sergeant Christopher Jones Arnold

Staff-Sergeant Christopher Jones Arnold served with the 14th battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War One. He died while serving in United Kingdom. He was entitled to the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. His mother received the Memorial Plaque and Memorial Cross

He was born on December 29, 1888 in Wolverton, Buckinghamshire, England.

He enlisted on September 21, 1914 at Camp Valcartier, Quebec with the 14th Infantry Battalion, naming his next-of-kin as his mother, Mrs. Louisa Arnold of Wolverton, He stated that he had four years’ service with an Active Militia as a member of the 3rd Regiment Victoria Rifles, that he was not married and that his trade was that of Pattern Maker.

Height: 5’ 6”               Weight: 140 lbs.         Eyes: grey

Hair: fair         Religion: Church of England

The Battalion sailed to England on October 3 aboard the S.S. Andania,

He was appointed Arm. Staff Corporal on January 1, 1915.

He left for the French theatre on August 1, joining the 14th Battalion in the field on the 4th.

He was appointed Arm. Corporal on September 25. He returned to the Canadian Base Depot on October 23rd, remaining there until November 20th, when he rejoined the 14th Battalion.

He was stuck off strength of the 14th Battalion and transferred to the Canadian Ordnance Corps on April 30, 1916. He was promoted to Arm Sergeant the next day, May 1st and transferred to the 13th battalion.

He reported “sick” two days after his transfer, to No. 14 Stationary Hospital at Wimereux with a suspected Enteric Fever on May 2nd. After three weeks, he was invalided and transferred “sick” to England, his condition stated as “Paratyphoid Slight”.

He soon found himself at the University War Hospital at Southampton on the 27th and diagnosed with Paratyphoid.

After ten days and no improvement in his condition, he was transferred to Ardington Park at West Croydon on June 6th and diagnosed Paratyphoid. He was transferred again, this time to Wear Bay Typhoid Convalescent Hospital on June 30, where he was to spend the next two months, to August 29, then transferred to the Military Hospital at Shorncliffe on the 30th and subsequently discharged, after four months hospitalization.

He required an additional three weeks at the Canadian Casualty Depot Monks Horton before he was struck off strength to the Canadian Ordnance Corps at Ashford on September 20.

He was later posted to the 13th Infantry Battalion for a short time.

He contracted German Measles and was admitted to “Isolation” at Moore Barracks Hospital at Shorncliffe on January 18, 1917. On February 6th, he was transferred to the Westcliffe Eye and Ear Hospital at Folkestone, diagnosed with Otitis Media (middle ear infection) and discharged two weeks later on the 22nd.

He soon saw a transfer from the Canadian Casualty Assembly Centre to the Canadian Ordnance Corps. He is documented as being “on command” at the Ordnance College in Woolwich on October 1, remaining there until February 8, 1918.

He was stuck off strength and proceeded overseas on February 28, taken on strength by the Canadian Ordnance Corps at Ashford on March 1st.

One week later, he was transferred to the 1st Canadian Infantry Battalion in Western Europe on March 8th. He soon saw another appointment, this time to Acting Arm. Staff Sergeant with pay on April 1st.

He was admitted to No. 3 Canadian Field Ambulance on June 5 and diagnosed Pyrexia of Unknown Origin and discharged the same day.

He was confirmed in the rank of Arm. Staff Sergeant in the field on July 1 while with the Canadian Ordnance Corps.

He was transferred to the 19th July Infantry Battalion at Witley on October 10th and returned to the Canadian Ordnance Corps on October 26th.

He was taken on strength at the Canadian Base Depot for disposal on October 29th before being transferred to England and posted to the General Depot at Witley on November 1st, whereupon he was taken on strength at the General Depot from the Canadian Ordnance Corps on November 4th.

He was admitted to the 11th Canadian General Hospital at Shorncliffe on November 6th with Chronic Bronchitis. In his medical records, it was noted that he was “seriously ill” and re-diagnosed with “Subacute, Malignant Endocarditis”. He had acquired a “cough” that lasted “most, all of the time”, combined with a shortness of breath, loss of weight and night sweats. His condition worsened over the next two weeks, to the point where he passed away on November 19, 1918.

In February of 1921, his mother, received his 1914-15 trio, The Memorial Plaque and Scroll and the Memorial Cross.

1914-15 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal

Brewer-H

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November 11th, a time to pause and remember

On the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, it is time to pause and remember those who fought on the battlefield, those who never came back and those on whom war left scars and wounds

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Pictures taken at Beechwood and Notre-Dame Cemetery in Ottawa, Canada

Captain Daniel Ellsworth Munn

Captain Daniel Ellsworth Munn served with the 47th battalion and the Royal Canadian Regiment during World War One. He is entitled to the 1914-15 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal.

British War Medal and Victory Medal

Pailthorpe medals

He was born on May 30, 1887 in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, the son of Angus and Sarah Agnes Munn, of New Westminster, British Columbia. He signed his Attestation Paper as a Lieutenant with the 47th Infantry Battalion, on March 24, 1915 in New Westminster,

He named his next-of-kin as his father, Angus, stating that he had previous military service with the 6th Regiment Duke of Connaught’s Own Rifles and the 104th Regiment Westminster Fusiliers of Canada. He was not married and that his trade as that of Estate & Insurance Broker.

The Battalion sailed to United Kingdom on November 13, 1915. He was later transferred to the Royal Canadian Regiment and soon found himself in the French theatre.

He was admitted to No. 9 Field Ambulance suffering from Influenza and Constipation and transferred to Mont des Cats the same day, June 13, 1916. He was again transferred, this time to No. 12 Casualty Clearing Station, where he received further treatment before rejoining his unit on July 7th. He was named Acting Captain on November 8, 1916; however, six months later, he was wounded during a trench raid on December 10, 1916. He was transferred to No. 3 General Hospital at Le Treport with a “slight gunshot wound to his scalp” on December 17th. He was absent from the ceremony where he was to receive his promotion to Captain, as he was still recovering from wounds.

He was evacuated to England via the Hospital Ship Dunluce Castle and transferred to Mrs. Arnold’s, 47 Roland Garden S.W. British Hospital on the 24th. Upon further assessment, he has suffering from gunshot wounds to his right forehead (temporal region) and the second finger on his right hand. He “had headaches for sometime after (the) injury” and by the end of December it was noted that “this Officer suffered the disability. Wounds healed. General health good except for lack of energy.”, although his “nervous system (was) somewhat weakened.” He was discharged on the 30th and deemed “unfit for service” for one month following his discharge, until being cleared for service beginning on January 29, 1917.

The following week, he proceeded overseas to rejoin the Royal Canadian Regiment on February 6, 1917, arriving in France on the 7th. He was transferred to the 3rd Entrenchment Battalion on February 11th and named Temporary Captain on February 28, 1917.

He was in command of “A” Company, stationed on the left side of the ridge, when he was wounded on the latter half of the first day of action, late on April 9 or early on April 10 at the Battle of Vimy Ridge. He was hospitalized at No. 6 Casualty Clearing Station and died from his wounds on April 18, 1917, at the age of 29. He is buried at Barlin Communal Cemetery at Pas de Calais, France.

His father, Angus, received his medals, plaque and scroll, while his mother, Sarah, received his Memorial Cross.

Private William Barry Cook

Private William Barry Cook served with the 59th battalion- Canadian Expeditionary Forces during WW1. He is entitled the the british War Medal and his enlistment number was 454702.

He was born on February 10th, 1872 in Military Headquarters of Western India

1911 Canadian census : Living at 185 Prescott with Agnes Scott. He had two daughter Gladys (3) and Nora (1)

June 24th, 1915 : He enlisted as a private in Smith Falls, Ontario. He had four sons who were age 18, 15, 5 and 6

Religion : Church of England     Status : married       Height : 5′ 6″

Eyes : brown         Hair : dark       Weight : 151 lbs       Trade : plasterer

Name of his wife : Agnes Ann Cook Address : 185 Prescott avenue, Toronto

On his enlistment paper he stated that he had 14 years of service with the Royal Engineers. According to his discharge paper, he was entitled to the Queen South Africa Medal, India General Service medal 1856 clasp Hazara 1891, India General Service clasps Chitral 1895 and Tirah 1897 and the Egypt medal 1898. I did research this gentleman and he is not on the medals roll for the Sudan campaign with Royal Engineer .

August 25th : He sailed from Montreal on SS Scandinavian. Arrived in England on September 5th

September 5th : He transferred to the 39th battalion

October 8th : He was promoted to acting-corporal

April 10th, 1916 : He was admitted to Moore’s Barracks

September 2nd : He was discharged to Canada and sailed to Canada on September 5th

October 2nd : Discharged in Québec

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Private William Barry Cook British War Medal

Private Joseph Pierre Télésphore Parent

Private Joseph Pierre Télésphore Parent served in 2nd Quebec Regiment (Quebec) with the Canadian Expeditionary Forces during WW1. He is entitled to the British War Medal only. His enlistment number was 4035421.

Born on June 13th, 1897 in Riviere a Pierre, Quebec                Trade : labourer

Religion : Roman Catholic               Status : single                        Height : 5′ 5″

Eyes : blue                                        Hair : pale                              Weight : 140 lbs.

Name of his mother : Malvina Parent       Address : Shawinigan Falls, Quebec

Enlisted on November 11th, 1917 in Montreal, Quebec in the 10th Canadian Reserve battalion

Embarked on SS Oxfordshire on June 26th, 1918 in Halifax. Arrived in Liverpool, England on July 15th.

He served only in United Kingdom and never went to France.

Embarked on the H.M.T. Caronia on June 25th, 1919.

Demobilized on July 4th, 1919.

In January 1960 he made a request to Canadian Veteran’s Affairs for a pension.

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Private John Joseph McAndrew

Private John Joseph McAndrew served in the Canadian Forestry Corps during WW1. He is entitled to the British War Medal only.

Born on April 28th, 1897 in Liverpool, England Trade : farmer

Religion : Roman Catholic     Status : Single      Hair: fair

Eyes : blue           Weight : 120 lbs          Height : 5′ 1″

Name of the sister : Sarah McAndrew

Address : 152 Nelson Street, Ottawa

1901 United Kingdom Census: Not listed

August 26th, 1916 : Enlisted in the 230th battalion in Ottawa, Ontario

January 26th, 1917 : Sailed form Halifax on SS Grampian. Arrived in England on February 6th

April 4th : Hospitalized for scabies

May 1st : Taken on strength at the Canadian Forestry Corps Headquarters in London, England

August 26th, 1918 : Awarded the good conduct badge

November 26th : Hospitalized for influenza. Released on December 19th

December 24th : Leave of absence. Returned January 2nd

March 23rd, 1919 : Sailed to Canada

April 1st : Discharged in Ottawa

1967: He died

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Private John Joseph McAndrew British war Medal

Lance-Corporal Hugh John Pate

Lance-Corporal Hugh John Pate served in the Canadian Army Medical Corps during WW1. He is entitled to the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. His enlistment number was  523310.

He was born on December 15 th, 1874 in Cambridge, England

1881 Census taken in Cambridge, Cambridge, England

John Hugh Pate : Born in 1874 in Cambridge, England   Occupation : scholar

John Leaden Pate (father) : Born in 1838 in Downham, Norfolk, England

Occupation : Carpenter Master Employing 11 Men 3 Boys

Mary Anne Weeson (mother) : Born in 1844 in Cambridge, Cambridge, England

1901 British census

John Hugh : Born in Canterbury Cambridge Chesterton Trade : Carpenter and joiner

Living at 13 Bluecoat street in West Nottingham

Father Born in Downham Isle of Ely Cambridgeshire Chesterton    Trade : Builder

 

He enlisted on July 12th 1916 in Scarcee Camp, Calgary  in the 1st Field Ambulance Depot. He lied about his age on enlistment, he said he was born in 1880. He also mentionned that he served for 9 years prior to his enlistment in the 2nd Regiment Queen Own Rifles

Trade : salesman

Religion : Church of England   Status : single    Height : 5′ 8″

Eyes : grey      Hair : auburn      Weight : 150 lbs.

December 21st : Embarked in Halifax on the SS Olympic. Arrived in England on December 26th

July 1st, 1917 : Promoted Corporal

July 18th: Received the Good Conduct badge

October 15th: Transferred to the Canadian Special Hospital in Buxton.

February 4th, 1918 : He was reverted to the rank of private

September 10th: Transferred overseas. Attached to the 1st Canadian General Hospital.

July 2 nd 1919: Struck of strength of the 16th Canadian General Hospital

August 13th : Sailed from England on sailing list 34. Arrived in Canada on August 21st. Discharged on that day.

Died January 30th, 1966 resulting a car accident at the Veteran’s hospital in British Columbia. Buried in Oak Burial Park – Grove Victoria, Falaise Drive Vancouver Island, British Columbia O plot 249 grave 10 / west. No marker is existing for his grave (email from Judy Wasylenko). His death certificate state he was cremated on February 3rd, he was a retired clergyman and single.

February 2 nd 1966 –  Times Colonist PATE – died 30 Jan 1966 – Rev. Fr. Hugh John Pate, 91y, former pastor of St.George’s Liberal Catholic Church 2512 Douglas St. The late Rev. Fr. Pate served overseas in France in WW 1 with the RCAMC. Haywards Funeral Chapel – Cremation

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Private Hugh John Pate WW1 medals

Private Montague Chambers

Private Montague Chambers served in the 42nd battalion Black Watch (Montreal) during WW1. He is entitled to the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. His enlistment number was 192659. His War Service Badge class “A” number was 93031.

he was born on September 8th 1880 in London, England      Trade : tailor

Religion : Church of England   Status : married    Hair: black

Eyes : brown     Weight : 140 lbs      Height : 5′ 3″

Name of his wife : Violet Chambers   Address :  20 Ottawa street,  Toronto

August 3rd, 1915 : He enlisted in Toronto, Ontario in the 92nd battalion as a bugler

November 27th, 1915 : He sailed from Halifax on S.S. Lapland

December 5th, 1915 : He was transferred to the 43rd battalion

January 28th, 1916 : He was transferred to the 17th battalion

He arrived with the 42nd battalion beginning of March.

March 15th : Left for France with the 42nd battalion. They arrived in the trenches near Ypres

May 18th : he was admitted to the 10th Canadian Field Ambulance. He was discharged on June 7th.

September 20th : Admitted at the hospital for pyrexia of unknown origin. Discharged from hospital on November 11th.

April 9th, 1917: Battle of Vimy Ridge.

April 1918: From April 12th to May 7th the battalion was on the front line making that stay at the front line, their longest stay of WW1.

August 8th : First day of the Battle of Amiens. The battalion was bivouacked in the rear lines. They joined the front line on August 11th.

August 26 : First day of the battle of Scarpe, they joined the front line the next day.

September 26th : First day of the battle of the Canal du Nord, the battalion was in the rear lines. During the night of the 28th, they moved to the front and launched their attack on the Douai-Cambrai road the next day, the 29th.

November: The battalion has been assigned the task of recapturing the city of Mons before the ceasing of hostilities at 11:00. By day break the battalion had mopped the city and established outpost on the eastern outskirt of the city

March 1st, 1919 : Battalion entrained at Liphook Station for Liverpool where they sailed for Canada on the R.M.S. Adriatic

March 1st 1919: Embarked on RMS Adriatic and arrived in Halifax on March 9th. They entrained for Montreal and arrived on March 11th. He was demobilized in Toronto, Ontario

Address after demobilisation : 29 Gibson street, Toronto, Ontario

September 22nd, 1958 : Died

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Private Montague Chambers WW1 medals

Private Edwin Hodges

Private Edwin Hodges served in the Canadian Army Medical Corps during WW1. He is entitled to the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. His enlistment number was 1659. His War Service badge class ・A・number is 321242

He was born on August 2nd 1887 in London, England

Trade : butcher and farmer         Religion : Protestant      Status : single

Hair: brown           Eyes : grey          Weight : 140 lbs       Height : 5′ 6″

November 11th, 1914 : he enlisted in the 5th Canadian Field Ambulance in Toronto, Ontario. He belonged to the active militia before enlistment.

March 20th, 1915 : The 5th Ambulance did their last parade in Toronto before departure

March 25th : He was hospitalized for three days (influenza)

April 15th : The unit left the camp (Exhibition Camp) to entrained. They arrived in Montreal on the 16th at 8:25. They left for Halifax, arrived in on the 17th at 19:45 and sailed from Halifax on the SS Northland on the 18th at 18:00. They arrived in Avonmouth, England on the 29th at 6:00., disembarked and reached in Westenhanger at 17:00. They walked 1 ½ mile to Sandling Camp, Shorncliffe, and reached they final destination at 16:00.

May 24th : They arrived at Otterpoll at 13:00 and they began mounting their new camp. They stayed at this place until September 15th.

August 10th : He was admitted to the 5th Canadian Field Ambulance for constipation

September 2nd : The 5th Ambulance was inspected by the King

September 15th : Early that night the unit entrained at Westenhanger, first train left at 3:00. The second left at 4:30. Trains arrived in South Hampton at 8:15 and 10:00. Most members of the 5th C.F.A. embarked on the SS Indian and sailed to France at 18:00 (7 officers and 64 N.C.O. embarked on SS Viper)

September 16th : They arrived in Havre, France at 5:00, disembarked at 7:00, they walked to Camp 5. They left it at 3:30 am, entrained at 8:20 on the 17th. Arrived in Saint-Omer on the 18th at 2:00. They arrived in Wizernes on the 19th and heard artillery shots for the first time. Arrived in Danoutre, Belgium on the 21st to replace the 84th Territorial Forces Ambulance. Received their first casualties on the 24th.

January 7th 1916 : He was detailed as clerk in A section nursing section (information from Daily Orders notebook 5th C.F.A.)

January 22nd : He was admitted to the 5th Canadian Field Ambulance.

September 30th : He proceeded to Paris on permission (from Daily Orders notebook 5th C.F.A.)

October 7th, 1917 : He proceeded on leave (13 days)

October 8th : He was taken on strength (information from Daily Orders notebook 5th C.F.A.)

October 20th : He returned from his leave of absence (information from Daily Orders notebook 5th C.F.A.)

February 18th, 1918 : He proceeded on leave (14 days)

March 16th : No 1659 Pte Hodge E on returning from leave of absence as taken on the ration strenght 18th (information from Daily Orders notebook 5th C.F.A.)

December 5th : The unit entered Germany at 9:30 and they crossed the Rhine on the 13th.

April 7th, 1919 : He returned to England and arrived in South Hampton on the 8th at 8:00

April 24th : Granted 14 days leave, on return from leave returned to Canada with dependant

Sailed (sailing list D-33) from England on HMT Metagama on August 3rd, 1919. Arrived in Quebec on the 14th.

He was demobilized on August 15th, in Quebec. His address on demobilization was 26 Hunt street west Hamilton

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Private Edwin Hodges WW1 medals