Category Archives: Canadian Medical Services

Nursing Sister Beatrice Vidal – UPDATED

Nursing sister Beatrice H Vidal served with the Canadian Army Medical Corps during World War One. She is entitled to the British War Medal and Victory Medal.

She was born in Quebec City, Quebec on August 6th, 1874

She was the third wife of General Beaufort Henry Vidal. He died in March 2nd 1908. When the general son’s, Maurice Henry Vidal, enlisted at the end of September 1915, he gave her mother-in-law as his next-of-kin. Her address was 190 Cobourg, Ottawa, Ontario

She enlisted on April 16th, 1916 in Taplow, England

Height: 5′ 1″             Weight: 110 lbs.       Religion: Roman Catholic

Eyes: blue                  hair: fair

She gave her son-in-law, Maurice Henry Vidal, as her relation (not a next-of-kin). He was her deceased husband child. She was a Nursing Sister with the CAMC in Canada on enlistment.

To be home Sister on February 9th, 1916

Daughter: Madame J. A. LeRoyer, 78 Malborough, Ottawa, Ontario

She proceeded to France on March 3rd, 1917

She was posted with the 6th Canadian General Hospital on March 6th.

She was admitted at the 2nd Canadian Stationary Hospital (neurasthenia) in Abbeville on May 9th

She transferred to the 14th Canadian General Hospital on May 10th.

She returned to England on May 18th

She was admitted at the Q.A.I.M.N.S. Hospital (debility) 71 Vincent Square on May 19th.  She was discharged from hospital on May 26th.

Maurice Henry Vidal was killed on July 29th. He was serving with the Canadian Army Service Corps

She sailed from England on HMTS Justicia on September 13th. She disembarked on September 25th.

She was discharged on January 31st, 1918 (Medically unfit). Her medical reports from that period reveal that she was underweight and was not able to get back to her normal weight.

She died on September 15th, 1923 at St-Luke Hospital in Ottawa fo gastro-intestinal intoxication

Her British War Medal, Victory Medal, Memorial Plaque and Scroll were sent to her daughter on Malborough Avenue in Ottawa. No one is entitled to the Memorial Cross.

 

Memorial Plaque to Beatrice H Vidal

Memorial Plaque to Maurice Vidal

Private Clifford Hugh Hoskins

June 27th mark the anniversary of the sinking of the Hospital Ship Llandovery Castle, Private Hoskins was one of the member of the medical personnel onboard that ship.

Private Clifford Hugh Hoskins served with the Canadian Army Medical Corps during WW1. He is entitled to the British War medal and the Victory Medal.

He was born on February 19, 1895 in Castle Carey Somerset, England

He was examined on April 14 and enlisted April 16, 1915 in Hamilton, Ontario in the 36th battalion (Peel’s regiment). His number in the active militia was probably A-6310.

Religion : Church of England                 Status : single       Height : 5′ 7″

Eyes : grey               Hair : pale           Weight : 142 lbs.

Trade : He was a dairyman at the Borden Dairy company.

Name of his father : Thomas Hoskins Address : Park Street Castle Careyand

June 19 : He sailed from Montreal on board the S.S. Corsican and arrived in England on June 28.

October 11 : He was sentenced to 18 days without pays for being absent without permission for 8 days.

October 13: He was sentenced to 11 days without pay for refusing to obey a non-commission officer.

May 16, 1916 : He was sentenced to 5 days without pay for refusing to obey a non-commission officer and insulting an officer. At this date he was posted with the Canadian Army Medical Corps.

June 2: He was transferred overseas to France and sent to the 10th Canadian Field Ambulance on June 15.

October 1 to 7 : He was admitted to the 10th Canadian Field Ambulance for Pyrexia of Unknown Origin

May 10, 1917 : He was admitted to the 2nd Australian General Hospital in Wimereux for Light Asthenopia. He is sent back to his tasks on May 28.

May 29th : He was admitted to the 10th Canadian Field Ambulance. He ceased to be attach to the 3rd Division and transferred to the Canadian Army Medical Corps on the same day May 29th to August 23rd : Admitted to the Northumberland War Hospital in Adsforth New Castle on Tyne from Diagnostic : Light Asthenopia

June 11: jaundice             August 3: jaundice is cured

August 23 to September 10 : He was admitted at the Canadian General Hospital in Epsom.

March 21, 1918 : He was transferred on the Llandovery Castle.

June 27 : He died when the Llandovery Castle is torpedoed and sunk by the German U-boat U-86. It happened 140 miles from the coast  of Ireland. The ship sunk in less than ten minutes. On board there was 258 persons and only 24 survived from the attack. The German submarine was commanded by Lieutenant Helmut Patzig and the second in command were Dithmar and Boldt. After the war Captain Helmut Patzig was trial by Germany and sentenced to four years in prison for this attack.

This event was later used to boost the sale of War Bonds with this propaganda poster

Llandovery

Also during the last push of the last 100 days of the way, the code L.C. (for Llandovery Castle) was used as the code word to signify the launch of the attack

August 13: His body was recovered by United State Naval Force, he was identified and buried at sea. Canadian army report from United State Navy September 23, 1918.

June 24, 1922 : The Death Plaque and Memorial Scroll, Memorial Cross and his medals (British War medal and Victory medal ) were sent to his mother, Charlotte E. Hoskins.

His name is commemorated on at least three memorials

Halifax, Canada Memorial

Halifax MemorialHalifax Memorial Panel

The Castle Carey Memorial in Somerset, England

Somerset MemorialSomerset Memorial 2

and finally the Borden Diary Memorial in Toronto, Canada

Monument Laiterie Borden

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Picture of Private Clifford Hugh Hoskins

coupure-presse

Matron Margaret Heggie Smith – UPDATED (photos)

Matron Margaret Heggie Smith served in the Boer’s War and WW1 with the Canadian Army Medical Corps. She is entitled to the Royal Red Cross 1st class with bar, Queen’s South Africa Medal with no clasp, 1914-15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal.

Her medals are at the Bytown Museum in Ottawa.

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She was born May 24th, 1872 in Ottawa, Ontario

She was the daughter of William Heggie Smith of Ottawa.

She studied nursing at the Blockley Hospital in Philadelphia.

She enlisted in the Canadian Army Medical Corps to serve with the 19th Canadian Stationary Hospital in Harrismith, South Africa during the Boers’ War.

She returned to Canada in late July 1902.

She enlisted a first time on September 25th, 1914. She stated her address as 193 Slater Street, Ottawa, Ontario.

She was 5’ 6” and her religion was Presbyterian

I do not know why but she enlisted a second time on July 6th, 1917 in Orpington, England with the Ontario Military Hospital. On the paper her rank is Matron.

She served for two years in France, and 4 more years as Matron of the Ontario Military Hospital in Orpington, Kent, England, which became the No. 16 Canadian Field Hospital in 1917.

Photos of Margaret Smith in France

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She was back in Canada in 1919

July 31st, 1919 : In recognition of her exceptional service, King George V awarded a bar to her her the Royal Red Cross. For the link of her award in the London Gazette click hereSmith LG

She died aged 47 on May 12th, 1920 in Atlantic City. Her funeral service at St. Andrew’s Church in Ottawa and conducted by the Reverend George Fitzpatrick. It was attended by a large number of military officers. Obituary from The Canadian nurse and hospital review : “But years of steady and strenuous duty had its undermining effect, and it was in somewhat impaired health that Matron Smith returned to Canada. After some months’ treatment, she had seemingly recovered her health: and it was whilst in the enjoyment of a well-merited holiday, with friends, at Atlantic City, that, without warning, she was elected to join those “Whom God has called to His mysterious rest.”

She is buried at the Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa, Ontario

Picture of her gravestone

From The Canadian nurse and hospital review of January 1921 “The tablet, which is of handsome design, occupies a prominent place beneath the choir gallery and bears the following inscription: “In affectionate memory of Matron Margaret Heggie Smith, R.R.C., and Bar. Died 12th May, 1920. A Member of the C. A. M. C. Nursing Service since 1902. Served in the South African War and over five years in the Great War. This Tablet is erected by the members of the Overseas C. A. M. C. Nursing Service.

 Picture of the tablet in her honor at St-Andrew’s Church in Ottawa, Ontario

The ceremony throughout was most impressive. Rev. Mr. Kilpatrick referred feelingly to the life of service and sacrifice led by Matron Smith, and pointed out the relation of such a life to other lives dedicated to Christ. There were three points of contact: 1, the inspiration of love; 2, the swift recognition of need, human and divine; 3, a measureless sacrifice. These things, the preacher said, should call forth notes of thanks giving and pride, as in the old days, at an hour of sacrifice, they sounded the trumpets and sang the songs of the Lord. The memory of Matron Smith, Rev. Mr. Kilpatrick said, should lead to a high resolution to keep faith with those who died for the nation.
As the preacher delivered the words “To the glory of God and in pride and loving memory this tablet is now dedicated,” Mrs. Meighen pulled the cord and a thin silk Union Jack fell away and revealed the tablet. This was followed by a brief dedicatory prayer and the singing of the Doxology.”

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Nursing Sister Sadie Saint-Germain – UPDATED

This is the story of Nursing Sister Sadie St-Germain who I decided to revisit since I found some new and interesting information on her. Not listed on the Official list of WW1 casualties but her cause of death was linked to her war service on an official Canadian Government document (see below). This put the total of casualties to 63 Canadian nurses serving with the Canadian Army Medical Corps died of cause related to war.

Nursing Sister Sadie Saint-Germain served with the Canadian Army Medical Corps during World War One. She is entitled to the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

She was born on July 21st 1884 in Hull, Quebec

She enlisted on August 10th, 1916 in Kingston, Ontario

Her mother was Mrs St- Germain and living at 321 James Street in Ottawa, Ontario

Height : 5’ 5’’1/2      Weight : 107 lbs.    Religion : Baptist

She sailed from Canada on August 16th, 1916 on SS Ascania.

She was hospitalised for a bronchitis on January 3rd, 1917. Everything was back to normal on February 14th.

She was attached to the Kitchener Military Hospital in Brighton on March 8th.

She proceeded to France on September 18th. She was transferred to the 1st Canadian General Hospital on arrival.

She was posted with the 2nd Canadian Stationary Hospital on December 21st, 1918.

She was posted with the 10th Canadian General Hospital on February 18th, 1919.

She sailed from England on May 13th on SS Northland and arrived in Halifax on May 23rd.

She was demobilised on May 26th, 1919.

She died on May 3rd 1923 .Buried in Saint-James Cemetery in Hull, Quebec
Obituary from the Ottawa Citizen May 4th, 1923.
St – Germain – Passed away suddenly May 3rd 1923, nursing sister St-Germain Funeral private from brother residence 122 Cartier Street. Please omit flower.

Below is Nursing Sister Sadie St-Germain Certificate the cause of death. Her death was related to her war service but no Memorial Plaque or Memorial Cross were issued to her family. Her file is quiet about that. Her brother was still alive when she died so technically he should have received one but he did not. Why? History is silent about that

Germain cause of death

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Nursing Sister Sadie St-Germain gravestone in St-James Cemetery in Hull (now Gatineau)

stone-sadie-st-germain

Nursing Sister Evelyn Verra McKay

Nursing Sister Evelyn Verra McKay served in the Canadian Army Medical Corps during WW1. She is entitled to the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. She was one of the few female casualties of war and a Memorial Cross, Memorial Plaque and Scroll were issued to her parents.

She was born on September 24th 1892 in Galt, Ontario.

Height : 5′ 9″     Weight: 160 lbs.        Religion:Presbyterian

She enlisted on November 6th, 1916 in London, Ontario.

Picture of Nursing Sister Evelyn Verra McKay (before the war)

Sailed to England on December 9th 1916 on board ship Missanabie. Arrived in London on December 19th.

She was transferred to the 3rd Canadian General Hospital, Boulogne on August 25th, 1917.

She entered the 3rd Canadian General Hospital (as a patient) on October 30th, 1918 (dangerously ill),

She died on November 4th from a broncho-pneumonia at the age of 26.

Her medals (British War Medal, Victory Medal)  and Memorial Cross were sent her mother, Sarah Mckay, 85 Rose street  in Galt, Ontario. The Memorial Plaque and Scroll were sent to her father Mark McKay.

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Picture of Nursing Sister Evelyn Verra McKay gravestone

Nursing Sister Sarah Ellen Garbutt

Nursing Sister Sarah Ellen Garbutt served in the Canadian Army Medical Corps during World War One. She served only in United Kingdom, so she is entitled only to the British War Medal.

She was born on May 14th, 1875

Religion : Methodist

She enlisted on April 3rd, 1917 in Kingston, Ontario.

She sailed from Halifax on May 29th and arrived in Liverpool, England on June 8th.

She was posted with the 16th Canadian General Hospital on arrival in uUnited Kingdom.

She was hospitalized at the Queen Alexandria Hospital (71 Saint Vincent) on June 27th, 1917.

She died from an abdomen cancer on August 20th, 1917 at the age of 42.

Her British War Medal was sent to her sister Esther Garbutt. Her Mémorial Plaque and Mémorial Scroll were sent to her brother Reverend John Garbutt 52 Simcoe Street, South Oshawa Ontario

No Memorial Cross issued since mother had preceded her.

She is buried at the Brookwood Military Cemetery, Surrey, United Kingdom, III. A. 15.

Picture of her gravestone

Matron Yvonne Beaudry (Baudry) A.R.R.C. – UPDATED

Matron Yvonne Baudry (Beaudry) served as a Matron in the Canadian Army Medical Corps during World War One. She is entitled to the Royal Red Cross 2nd class, the British War Medal, the Victory Medal and the Médailles des épidémies or (France)

In her military file, on all the documents, her name is spelled Baudry but there was an error done probably when she enlisted, her real name is Beaudry.

She was born in October 16th, 1875 in Beauharnois, Quebec

Trade: nurse Religion: Roman Catholic Status: Single

Height: 5′ 3″         Weight : 148 lbs.

Brother : Chambord Baudry      Address : 158 Cameron, Ottawa

1901 : Graduated from the Nursing School of the St-Luke Hospital in Ottawa, Ontario

From 1901 to 1907 : She served at the Stratchona Hospital (Ottawa Hospital), Hospital in the Scarlet Fever unit

from 1909 to 1914: She was the Head Nurse at the Grosse-Ile quarantine station, Quebec. The Grosse-Ile island was the quarantine station for all the immigrants travelling to Québec City which was a major port of entry to Canada at the time

She had to manage a team of 12 nurses and on average, 900 immigrants were hospitalized at Grosse-Ile every year

Picture of Head Nurse, Yvonne Baudry (On the left) taken at Grosse-Ile

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Picture of the nurses’ residence at the Grosse-Ile quarantine station. The house was built in 1912

Grosse-Ile Maison infirmière 1912

Pictures of the Grosse-Ile cross that were taken 103 years apart

1910 (year of erection)

2013

Cross 2013

November 8th, 1915 : She enlisted in the 6 th Canadian General Hospital in Montreal, Quebec

January 15th, 1916 : She left Canada with a group of 25 Nursing Sisters. She was taken on strength with the Canadian Army medical Corps on January 25th.

February 22nd : She was posted at the Westcliff Canadian Eyes and Ears Hospital, Folkestone

She was on leave from July 15th to July 28th

August 1st : She proceeded overseas with the 8th Canadian General Hospital. Transferred to the 6th Canadian General Hospital on August 4th. She joined the hospital in Joinville-le-Pont, France.

According to the biography of Margaret McDonald, the Matron-in-Chief of the Canadian Army Medical Corps, Matron Beaudry was sent to the 8th Canadian General Hospital to coach the matron who was experiencing some managing problems with the hospital. The Matron of the 8th Canadian General Hospital had not solved some problems raised by the Matron MacDonald during her spring inspection of the hospital, Matron Beaudry was sent to the rescue.

January 18th, 1917 : The hospital moved to Troyes.

June 21st : The hospital move back to Joinville-le-Pont

July 3rd : She was granted 14 days leave. Returned to the unit August 17th.

October 19th: She went to Joinville-le-Pont to rent some apartments for the Nursing Sisters

May 13th, 1918 : She proceeded to Rouen to see the new Nursing Sisters quarters. She was back with the unit on May 16th.

June 6th : She arrived from Troyes

June 29th : She and 4 Nursing Sisters proceeded to Rouen in honour of Dominion Day. In her file this leave is mark as a “3 days special leave

September 3rd : She was granted 14 days leave.

March 18th 1919 : She was granted 14 days leave.

to May 10th : The 6th Canadian General Hospital was disbanded

May 29th : She was transferred to the 14th Canadian General Hospital

July 3rd : She embarked on the Empress of Britain in Liverpool, United Kingdom. Arrived in Quebec City, Quebec on July 10th.

July 15th : She was discharged on that date and her proposed address was 158 Cameron Street, Ottawa

December 12th : She was awarded the Royal Red Cross 2nd class

July 9th, 1926 : She was awarded the French Médailles des épidémies or.

After discharge she served with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics from which she retired in 1939

1947 : She died after a long illness.

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Picture of Matron Yvonne Beaudry in her WW1 Matron uniform

The site of Grosse-île is now an historic site managed by Park Canada. Tourist can visit the park and guided tour are offered with guided and actors playing role of real person who were on the island. This picture below is one of actors who are playing the role of these real people, the actress of the left plays the role of head nurse Yvonne Beaudry.

Actors playing real nurse Yvonne Beaudry and 'Pit' Masson the ambulance guy - Picture of Berthier-sur-Mer, Quebec
This photo of Grosse-Ile is courtesy of TripAdvisor

Private Charles Forbes Simpson

Private Charles Forbes Simpson served in the Canadian Army Medical Corps during World War One. He is entitled to the 1914-15 Star, British War Medal and the Victory Medal. His enlistment number was 03673. He received two War Service Badge, his badge class A # 256016 and his badge class B # 52851

Born on August 13th, 1897 in Sarnia, Ontario

Trade : Machinist     Religion :         Civil status : Single

Height  : 6′ 1″      Eyes : Blue    Hair : Fair       Weight  : 177 lbs.

Information from the 1901 Canadian Census

He was living in Sarnia, Ontario. His father’s name was Henry, his mother’s name was Mary. He was the last of 8 children.

June 26th 1915 : Enlisted in Sarnia, Ontario in the Canadian Army Medical Corps Reinforcement Depot 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital

August 1st : Sailed to Malta then to Alexandria en route to the Aegean sea.

August 16th : Reached the Port of Mudros on the Greek Island of Lemnos.

August 22nd : The 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital became operational on the island and they received their first patient at 10:00 am.

The hospital was part of a relief effort sent to help overcrowded Anzac medical services which could not take the large influx of wounded soldiers from the Gallipoli campaign. The Canadian Hospital was hastily sent to the island and they were not prepared to served under these conditions. It needed two nurses to change a patient wound dressing, one to change the dressing and one to fan out the flies of the wound (no joke here). Excessive heat and poor sanitary conditions were the contributing factors at spreading disease. Many of its members felt hill to disentry, some even died on the island.

He was there at the same time as Nursing Sister Mary Catherine English, John William Small, Mabel Clint and Nursing Sister Mary Frances Elizabeth Munro

October 8th : He was admitted to the hospital. He was discharged on October 14th.

November 21st: He was admitted again to the 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital. He was discharged on November 28th.

February 5th 1916 : The 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital left the Island of Mudros and arrived in Alexandria, Egypt on February 8th.

March 26th : The unit sailed from Egypt to England on the HMS Valdivia, transferred on the the HMS Britannic in Port Augusta, Sicily on March 28th and reached South Hampton, England on April 7th.

They were then put on another ship and sent to Havre, France where they arrived on April 8th. The unit was then taken by truck and lorries to Boulogne, France where they established their base.

July 23rd : Admitted (tonsillitis) to the 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital

August 30th : Transferred to England on H.S Dieppe

May 9th, 1918 : Taken on strength to C.A.M.C. Depot in Shorncliffe

December 21st : Absent without a leave until January 31st, 1919. He was sentenced to 27 days forfeit pays.

February 2nd, 1919 : Invalidated to Canada

February 13th : Arrived in Portland, Maine on ship Araguaya

April 7th : Discharged

June 1st, 1973 : Died at the Cambridge Nursing Center in North Clawson

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Picture of Private Charles Forbes Simpson

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Lance-Corporal Hugh John Pate

Lance-Corporal Hugh John Pate served in the Canadian Army Medical Corps during WW1. He is entitled to the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. His enlistment number was  523310.

He was born on December 15 th, 1874 in Cambridge, England

1881 Census taken in Cambridge, Cambridge, England

John Hugh Pate : Born in 1874 in Cambridge, England   Occupation : scholar

John Leaden Pate (father) : Born in 1838 in Downham, Norfolk, England

Occupation : Carpenter Master Employing 11 Men 3 Boys

Mary Anne Weeson (mother) : Born in 1844 in Cambridge, Cambridge, England

1901 British census

John Hugh : Born in Canterbury Cambridge Chesterton Trade : Carpenter and joiner

Living at 13 Bluecoat street in West Nottingham

Father Born in Downham Isle of Ely Cambridgeshire Chesterton    Trade : Builder

 

He enlisted on July 12th 1916 in Scarcee Camp, Calgary  in the 1st Field Ambulance Depot. He lied about his age on enlistment, he said he was born in 1880. He also mentionned that he served for 9 years prior to his enlistment in the 2nd Regiment Queen Own Rifles

Trade : salesman

Religion : Church of England   Status : single    Height : 5′ 8″

Eyes : grey      Hair : auburn      Weight : 150 lbs.

December 21st : Embarked in Halifax on the SS Olympic. Arrived in England on December 26th

July 1st, 1917 : Promoted Corporal

July 18th: Received the Good Conduct badge

October 15th: Transferred to the Canadian Special Hospital in Buxton.

February 4th, 1918 : He was reverted to the rank of private

September 10th: Transferred overseas. Attached to the 1st Canadian General Hospital.

July 2 nd 1919: Struck of strength of the 16th Canadian General Hospital

August 13th : Sailed from England on sailing list 34. Arrived in Canada on August 21st. Discharged on that day.

Died January 30th, 1966 resulting a car accident at the Veteran’s hospital in British Columbia. Buried in Oak Burial Park – Grove Victoria, Falaise Drive Vancouver Island, British Columbia O plot 249 grave 10 / west. No marker is existing for his grave (email from Judy Wasylenko). His death certificate state he was cremated on February 3rd, he was a retired clergyman and single.

February 2 nd 1966 –  Times Colonist PATE – died 30 Jan 1966 – Rev. Fr. Hugh John Pate, 91y, former pastor of St.George’s Liberal Catholic Church 2512 Douglas St. The late Rev. Fr. Pate served overseas in France in WW 1 with the RCAMC. Haywards Funeral Chapel – Cremation

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Private Hugh John Pate WW1 medals

Private Edwin Hodges

Private Edwin Hodges served in the Canadian Army Medical Corps during WW1. He is entitled to the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. His enlistment number was 1659. His War Service badge class ・A・number is 321242

He was born on August 2nd 1887 in London, England

Trade : butcher and farmer         Religion : Protestant      Status : single

Hair: brown           Eyes : grey          Weight : 140 lbs       Height : 5′ 6″

November 11th, 1914 : he enlisted in the 5th Canadian Field Ambulance in Toronto, Ontario. He belonged to the active militia before enlistment.

March 20th, 1915 : The 5th Ambulance did their last parade in Toronto before departure

March 25th : He was hospitalized for three days (influenza)

April 15th : The unit left the camp (Exhibition Camp) to entrained. They arrived in Montreal on the 16th at 8:25. They left for Halifax, arrived in on the 17th at 19:45 and sailed from Halifax on the SS Northland on the 18th at 18:00. They arrived in Avonmouth, England on the 29th at 6:00., disembarked and reached in Westenhanger at 17:00. They walked 1 ½ mile to Sandling Camp, Shorncliffe, and reached they final destination at 16:00.

May 24th : They arrived at Otterpoll at 13:00 and they began mounting their new camp. They stayed at this place until September 15th.

August 10th : He was admitted to the 5th Canadian Field Ambulance for constipation

September 2nd : The 5th Ambulance was inspected by the King

September 15th : Early that night the unit entrained at Westenhanger, first train left at 3:00. The second left at 4:30. Trains arrived in South Hampton at 8:15 and 10:00. Most members of the 5th C.F.A. embarked on the SS Indian and sailed to France at 18:00 (7 officers and 64 N.C.O. embarked on SS Viper)

September 16th : They arrived in Havre, France at 5:00, disembarked at 7:00, they walked to Camp 5. They left it at 3:30 am, entrained at 8:20 on the 17th. Arrived in Saint-Omer on the 18th at 2:00. They arrived in Wizernes on the 19th and heard artillery shots for the first time. Arrived in Danoutre, Belgium on the 21st to replace the 84th Territorial Forces Ambulance. Received their first casualties on the 24th.

January 7th 1916 : He was detailed as clerk in A section nursing section (information from Daily Orders notebook 5th C.F.A.)

January 22nd : He was admitted to the 5th Canadian Field Ambulance.

September 30th : He proceeded to Paris on permission (from Daily Orders notebook 5th C.F.A.)

October 7th, 1917 : He proceeded on leave (13 days)

October 8th : He was taken on strength (information from Daily Orders notebook 5th C.F.A.)

October 20th : He returned from his leave of absence (information from Daily Orders notebook 5th C.F.A.)

February 18th, 1918 : He proceeded on leave (14 days)

March 16th : No 1659 Pte Hodge E on returning from leave of absence as taken on the ration strenght 18th (information from Daily Orders notebook 5th C.F.A.)

December 5th : The unit entered Germany at 9:30 and they crossed the Rhine on the 13th.

April 7th, 1919 : He returned to England and arrived in South Hampton on the 8th at 8:00

April 24th : Granted 14 days leave, on return from leave returned to Canada with dependant

Sailed (sailing list D-33) from England on HMT Metagama on August 3rd, 1919. Arrived in Quebec on the 14th.

He was demobilized on August 15th, in Quebec. His address on demobilization was 26 Hunt street west Hamilton

He died in 1977

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Private Edwin Hodges WW1 medals

Nursing Sister Nellie Grace Rogers

Nursing Sister Nellie Grace Rogers served as a Nursing Sister in the Canadian Army Medical Corps during WW1.

She was born on December 18th, 1889 in London, Canada.

Height: 5′ 5″     Weight : 115 lbs.           Religion : Baptist

She enlisted on November 11th, 1917 in Toronto but she only passed her medical exam on July 15th 1918 in Burlington.

She died on October 19th, 1918 from influenza in Toronto at the age of 28.

She never went to Europe. So her only medal entitlement is the British War Medal that was sent to her mother, Adelia Rogers in Listowel, Ontario with her Memorial Cross.

Her Memorial Plaque and Scroll were sent to her father, James Rogers

She is buried at the Listowel Cemetery, Ontario, Canada in lot 5. range 10.

Picture of Nursing Sister Nellie Grace Rogers gravestone

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Nursing Sister Bertha Evelyn McDonald,

Nursing Sister Bertha Evelyn McDonald served in the Canadian Army Medical Corps during WW1. She is not entitled to any military medal.

She was born on March 3rd, 1895 in Alexandria, Ontario

She was hospitalised at Laurentide Sanatorium in Sainte Agathe, Quebec from April 1st to April 30th, 1918.

Her enlistement papers show that she joined the CEF on September 18, 1918 in Montreal, Quebec.

Height: 5′ 4″             Weight:122 lbs.           Religion:Roman Catholic

Her address 112 Saint-Luc Street, Montreal, Quebec

She was declared medically unfit on January 6th, 1919 in Montreal, Quebec.

She was hospitalised for influenza at Montreal General Hospital in April 1919 following which was marked debility.

She was hospitalised at Sainte Anne de Bellevue Hospital from May 2nd to June 2nd, 1919.

She was hospitalised again at Sainte Anne de Bellevue Hospital from June 18th to June 27th, 1919.

She was declared medically unfit and demobilised on July 28th, 1919.

Because she never left Canada, she did not receive any military medal for her service

In two places in her WW1 file it is stated that her military service began near May 1917 but her certificate of service date her appointing as nursing sister as September 18th, 1918 but she was hospitalised in a military hospital before that date.

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Inscription on her gravestone

1917-1919 C.A.M.C. – SISTER – W.W.1

IN LOVING MEMORY OF BERTHA E. MACDONALD

DAUGHTER OF DR D. D. MACDONALD

AND

CATHERINE MACDONNELL SPOUSE OF CHARLES KERR

AND OF

SCOTT E. BIRD

BORN ALEXANDRIA MAY 3 1894

DIED – OTTAWA DEC 16 1973

MAY HER SOUL REST IN PEACE

BLESSED ARE THEY THAT PUT

THEIR TRUST IN HIM

PSALMS 2:12

Some WW2 Nursing Sisters gravesites near Ottawa, Ontario

On this day we celebrate V E Day (Victory Day in Europe) here are some pictures of gravestone of a few Canadian Nursing Sisters who served during WW2. Let’s not forget that Canadian women wore khaki and also served during that conflict.

Matron Donalda Maud Robertson

Obituary from the Ottawa Citizen Friday December 2nd 1949, page 58

Robertson, Donalda Maud – In Toronto Western Hospital, December 2, 1949. Donalda Maud Robertson, Reg. N. daughter of Mrs Robertson and late Donald Robertson of Maxville, Ont. Funeral at Maxville United Church Sunday, December 4 at 2 p.m.. She is buried at Maxville Cemetery, Ontario.

Nursing Sister Thelma Hilda Wallace

She was born in 1916 and she died on April 19 1988 and buried in Bellevue Cemetery in Aylmer, Quebec

Nursing Sister Patricia Hession

She was born in 1921 and she died in 1993. She is buried in Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa, Ontario.

Nursing Sister Mary G Mitchell

She died April 27th 1946 and she is buried in Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa, Ontario.

Nursing Sister Margaret Andrew (née Irvine)

She was born on July 19th 1911 and she died on January 9th 2007. She is buried in Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa, Ontario.

Nursing Sister Dorothy M Hunter

She was born in 1919 and died in 2004. She is buried in Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa, Ontario.

Nursing Sister Clarice Lilian Tanner (née Ogden)

She was born January 29th 1915 and died February 8th 1992. She is buried in Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa, Ontario.

Nursing Sister Miriam Eastman Baker

Nursing Sister Miriam Eastman Baker served as a Nursing Sister in the Canadian Army Medical Corps during WW1. She is entitled to the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

She was born on August 20th, 1886 in London, England.

Height:5′ 5″     Weight:136 lbs.          Religion:Church of England

She graduated from Saint-Rubis Hospital, New-York in 1915

She enlisted in Winnipeg, Canada on October 2nd, 1917.

She was posted at the 16th Canadian General Hospital on November 1st. She was posted at the 15th Canadian General Hospital on March 14th, 1918.

She was admitted to the 15th Canadian General Hospital on August 22nd.(inflammation of the bladder)

She was discharged from the 15th Canadian General Hospital on September 3rd.

She was admitted at the 15th Canadian General Hospital on October 3rd.

She died on October 17 th, 1918 from a broncho-pneumonia at the 15th Canadian General Hospital at the age of 32.

Her Memorial Plaque and Memorial Scroll were sent to her brother Edwin Godfrey Phills Baker living at 500 Northern Crown Bldg, Winnipeg, Manitoba. Her British War Medal and Victory Medal were sent to her sister, Miss Doris Howard Baker, at 119 Wielmot Place Winnipeg, Manitoba Since her mother had preceeded her no Memorial Cross was issued.

Picture of Nursing Sister Miriam Eastman Baker

Nursing Sister Margaret Lowe

Nursing Sister Margaret Lowe served as a Nursing Sister in the Canadian Army Medical Corps during World War One. She was entitled to the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

She was born on January 26th, 1888, in Moyayshire, Scotland.

Height : 5′ 6″     Weight:140 lbs.          Religion : Presbyterian

She trained as a nurse at the Winnipeg Civic Hospital.

She enlisted on May 24th, 1917 in Winnipeg, Canada.

She sailed from Halifax on May 29 and arrived in Liverpool June 8. She was posted at the Ontario Military Hospital in Orpington in United Kingdom.

She was posted at the 10th Canadian General Hospital on October 5th.

She was transferred to the 1st Canadian General Hospital on November 29th.

She was transferred to the 4th Canadian General Hospital on December 5th.

She arrived in France on January 26th, 1918 and posted with the 10th Canadian Stationary Hospital.

She was transferred to the 1st Canadian General Hospital on March 8th.

She was wounded in the air attack by the Germans of the 1st Canadian General Hospital on May 19th, 1918. She had a fractured skull and chest penetration.

She died on May 28th, 1918 from her wounds at the 24th British General Hospital, Etaples. She is buried at the Etaples Military Cemetery in France.

Her British War Medal, Victory Medal, Memorial Plaque and Scroll were sent to her father Thomas Lowe in Binscarth, Manitoba

No Memorial Cross was issued, her mother had preceeded her.

The complete scan of her military file can be found on the website of Library and Archives Canada

If you know more information on this lady, please leave me message so I can add it to her small biography

Picture of Nursing Sister Margaret Lowe’s funeral

click on the image to enlarge

Lowe's grave 3 Lowe's grave 2 Lowe's grave 1

Picture of her gravestone in Etaples Military Cemetery

Lowe's grave

(source Veterans Affairs Canada)

A memorial bears her name in Binscarth, Manitoba

The memorial in 1919

Lowe's Memorial 1

The memorial in 2012

Lowe's Memorial 2

Nursing Sister Margaret Lowe’s name is the first from the top

Lowe's Memorial