Category Archives: Officer

Captain William Hall White K.C. – UPDATED

I happened to find a small biography book on this gentleman. He was quite a character and an adventurer. He was not afraid to go where not too many Canadians of his generation went. He lived by the definition of a “true adventurer” The book is available at Shoreline Press.

Captain William Hall White served with the Battleford Column during the military expedition against Louis Riel and with Canadian Army Pay Corps during World War One. He is entitled to the North West Campaign Medal and the British War Medal.

He was born on April 29th, 1856 in Hamilton, Ontario. He had 9 brothers and sisters.

He entered Upper Canada College in 1873. He went to the University of Toronto and was called at the Bar in 1882 and then he headed to Winnipeg. He invested in the real estate booming there but lost all his money. He then moved to Brandon, Manitoba where he arrived on April 2nd, 1882.

He had received a land grant for a piece of land near Piles O’Bones River which later would become Regina. Arriving there on May 20th, 1882, he though his land was not the greatest one and moved to another place. The land he was granted was to be sold for 1 000 000 $ in 1898.

He was named Chief Commissioner of the Board of Commerce of Canada

William White 1881

Whitte 1881

North West Campaign 1885

On May 24th 1885 he left his partnership in his law firm and enlisted with the Battleford Column in Birtle, Manitoba. He was appointed a Major. His residence was in Ottawa and he claimed his medal on April 2nd. The Battleford Column was part of the Birtle Infantry Company. The unit was composed of 46 members and their mission was to bring supply to Colonel Otter’s force.

Battleford Column

Battleford Column

He married Frances Cholerton on March 23rd, 1884 in the North West Territories

1886: He was appointed Census Commissioner for the Provisional District of Eastern Assiniboine (south Saskatchewan)

1887: He was appointed crown Prosecutor for nine towns in Saskatchewan

He moved to Slocan City, British Columbia in 1897 and just after 6 months moved to Victoria.

His son Richard White was born on December 5th, 1893

His daughter Phyllis Maude was born on February 14th, 1896 in Winnipeg Canada.

He was a candidate for the 1898 provincial election in the Revelstoke District against James L. Kellie, he lost by just a few votes.

After a business trip to London, he was sent to Dawson City to investigate the action of the local manager of the trading and Exploring Company, a British based company which was doing some mining and merchandizing in Yukon.

He moved to Skagway Alaska in March of 1899. He lived in the Klondike for 5 years.

According to the 1901 census he was in Unorganized territories (Steamers) “Canadian, Selkirk, Nora” (Yukon), while his family was in Toronto Ward No. 4, York West, Ontario

He left the Klondike in the fall of 1904 and moved back to Vancouver, British Columbia

World war one

His address: «The Angela» Victoria, British Columbia. He was a lawyer in Yukon, his medical file mention of his semi-sedentary life.

Spouse: Frances Louisa White            Address: 129 Westbourne Terrace, London West , England

Trade: barrister at law             Religion: Church of England     Status: divorced

Height: 5′ 5″      Eyes: grey       Hair: grey         Weight: 170 lbs.

May 23rd, 1916: He enlisted in Victoria, British Columbia in the 143rd battalion (Railway construction

Battalion) as a Paymaster Officer with the Canadian Army Pay Corps. He was named Honorary Captain.

Captain William White in his WW1 uniform with his North West Campaign ribbon

photo

February 17th, 1917: Sailed from Canada on board the ship SS Southland, he arrived in England on February 27th.

March 23rd: He was transferred to the 24th Reserve battalion

March 5th to the 19th: He was hospitalized for bronchitis at the Military Hospital in Purfleet

May 20th: He ceased to be attached to the 24th Reserve Battalion

May 2nd: He was taken on strength with the 1st Canadian Reserve Battalion

June 7th: All paymasters with the C.E.F. who have been gazetted to hold honorary rank are granted temporary rank from the original date of their honorary rank. (London Gazette 30118)

September 20th: Ceased to be attached to the 1st Canadian Reserve battalion

September 25th: Transferred as a paymaster at the 4th Canadian General Hospital at Basingstoke.

He was hospitalized from the 10th to 27th of January 1918 at the 4th Canadian General Hospital at Basingstoke for asthma cause by bronchitis.

He was hospitalized from the 14th to the 17th of February at the Canadian Red Cross Officer Hospital in London West (17 North Audley Street) for bronchitis.

July 15th: 5 days leave

February 18th, 1919: Sent to Canada to be a paymaster. Arrived in Canada on February 21st. Transferred at the #2 District Depot (Toronto) Canadian Army Pay Corps, he was posted there until June 10th 1919.

He was transferred to Clearing station Service Command in Quebec where he was posted from June 11th to August 20th, 1919.

He was demobilized on August 20th.

His son-in-law, James Stanley Beatty, received the DFC during WW1

He died on at the age on June 1st, 1948 in Toronto. He was survived by his wife, France, who died on August 7th, 1956. She was the last officer spouse of a Riel Campaign veteran who was still receiving a pension cheque at that time.

Warrant-Officer Francis John Waddel

Warrant-Officer Francis John Waddel served with Canadian Army Ordinance Corps during World War One. He is entitled to the British War medal, Army Meritorious Service Medal and Permanent Forces of the Empire Beyond the Seas Long Service and Good Conduct Medal.

He was born on May 1, 1882 in Chatham, Kent, England.

He enlisted with the Canadian Ordnance Corps on July 19, 1912 at Halifax, Nova Scotia. He named his next-of-kin as his mother, Winifred Waddell of Chatham, England, stating that he had 8 years’ previous military service with the Army Ordnance Corps (May 1903 to May 1911), that he was not married and that his trade was that of Soldier.

He was appointed Lance Corporal on October 1, 1914, leaving for service in England shortly thereafter and was taken on strength from Canada at Ashford, Kent, England on February 1, 1915.

Eighteen days later, he signed his CEF Attestation Paper with the Canadian Ordnance Corps on February 19, 1915 at Salisbury, England.

He was promoted the following month, to Corporal on March 1st and re-engaged for a further period of three years’ general service with the Canadian Ordnance Corps at Ashford, Kent on July 19, 1915.

He was promoted to Staff Sergeant on October 1, 1915, to Staff Sergeant on February 2, 1916, Sergeant on April 1, 1916 and to Squadron Quartermaster Sergeant on June 1, 1916.

He proceeded to Liphook on command for temporary duty on July 20, 1916, later on command at Crowborough from November 15 to 17, 1916, then proceeded to Pluckley on command from January 19 to 29, 1917, before returning to No. 1 Detachment Canadian Ordnance Corps at Ashford.

He was granted permission to marry Edith Randall on April 26, 1917 at Ashford. Together they had two children: Francis William who was born on May 15, 1918 while at Ashford, the other is unnamed in his records.

He was to be Acting Sub Conductor (Warrant Officer, Class I) with pay and allowances on February 4, 1918 and signed his Re-Engagement Paper on July 22, 1918, re-engaging for three years’ service at Ashford, Kent, later being named Acting Conductor on August 1st.

He was transferred from No. 1 Detachment at Ashford and was placed on command to No. 2 Detachment at Ashford on May 21, 1919.

He was awarded his Meritorious Service Medal, in recognition of valuable service rendered in connection with the war on June 13, 1919. He ceased to be on command at No. 2 Detachment on rejoining No. 1 Detachment Canadian Ordnance Corps at Liphook on June 18th. He was then placed on command to No. 7 Detachment COC at Witley on June 23rd, saw a promotion to Staff Sergeant on August 18th, then struck off strength of No. 7 Detachment to No. 2 Canadian Ordnance Corps at Liphook on December 31st.

Waddell was struck off strength to No. 1 Detachment Canadian Ordnance Corps at London on February 1, 1920 and by the end of the month, was struck off strength of No. 1 COC on transfer to Canada and attached to the CEF in England on February 29th.

The following day, he was taken on strength from the Overseas Military Forces of Canada at London on March 1st to overseas detachment. He was to remain in England for next six months, before being struck off strength of the overseas detachment to Canada for further duty, embarking on the S.S. Grampian and arriving in Canada on September 29, 1920 and was discharged in Ottawa on October 1st, stating his proposed residence as Halifax, Nova, Scotia. He never went to France so he is not entitled to the Victory Medal.

He signed his Permanent Force of Canada Attestation Paper with the 6th Detachment of the Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps at Halifax on October 15, 1920.

He was listed as Category A (General Service). He saw a provisional promotion to Squadron Quartermaster Sergeant at Halifax on November 20th, then reverted to the rank of Staff Sergeant on August 1, 1921.

He was discharged on July 18, 1922 as a Staff Sergeant at Halifax, “In consequence of his service being no longer required”, with his conduct noted as “Exemplary”.

For his long service, Waddell was awarded the Permanent Forces of the Empire Beyond the Seas Long Service and Good Conduct Medal.

He and his wife later moved back to England, settling in Ashford where he died on January 26, 1979, at Ashford, County Kent, at the age of 96, his death attributed to a combination of cardiac failure in conjunction with myocardial degeneration, along with carcinoma of his bladder. He had also been diagnosed with senility and dementia.

Captain Michael William Buckingham

Captain Michael William Buckingham served in the Royal Army Medical Corps during the Malaya Campaign and the Malay Peninsula expedition. He is entitled to the General Service Medal 1918 (clasp Malaya), the General Service Medal 1962 (clasp Malay Peninsula) and the Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal.

He was probably born last semester of the 1930

He enlisted in 1948 in the Royal Army Medical Corps

He served in Malaya campaign after 1953

He served as a Warrant Officer class 1 in the Malay Peninsula between 17th August, 1964 to January 13th 1966.

He transferred as a Commissionned Officer and was promoted Lieutenant (rank on his Long Service Medal)

He received his Army Long Service Good Conduct Medal on January 13th 1966

He was promoted to the rank of Captain (non-medical) on November 15th 1969

He retired on December 1st 1976

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Captain Michael William Buckingham medals

Buckingham 1

Lieutenant-Colonel George Johnston Stoney Archer

Lieutenant-Colonel George Johnston Stoney Archer, B.A., M.B., B.Ch., B.A.O. served in the Royal Army Medical Corps during the Boers’ War and World War One. He is entitled to the Queen’s South Africa Medal (clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State and Transvaal), the King South Africa Medal (clasps South Africa 1901 and 1902), the 1914 Star, The British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

He was born in the no 3rd Ward in Dublin, Ireland on November 15th, 1875. His father George Thompson Archer and his mother Mary Elizabeth Stoney

He received his degree in medicine 1897 from the University of Dublin

He was promoted Lieutenant on July 27th, 1898 (London Gazette)

He married Ethel Mary Beauchamp on September 4th, 1899 in St-Stephen Parish, Dublin, Ireland. His address at the time was 4 Longfield Terrace North Circular Road. Together they will have four children.

During the Boers War he served with the 5th and 7th Stationary Hospital

He was promoted Captain in on July 27th, 1901 (London Gazette)

He was promoted Major on April 27th, 1910 (London Gazette)

He disembarked in France on August 19th, 1914.

He was promoted Lieutenant-Colonel on March 2nd, 1915 (London Gazette)

He was placed on the ill-heal list on December 23rd, 1920 and he retired on October 25th, 1921 due to his illness contracted while on service. (London Gazette)

In May of 1923, he applied for the Soldier Wound Badge and it was refused to him. This badge was given to soldiers who received wounds or illness during the war

On January 3rd, 1929 he left South Hampton, United Kingdom with his wife on the ship Johan de Wit for Batavia, Java. He is listed as a Lieutenant-Colonel (still). They came back to United Kingdom at the end of the month.

He also bought a piece on land in Gloucestershire in the same year

He died on November 5th 1955 in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire leaving 27293 £.

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Captain Charles Edward McCloghry

Captain Charles Edward McCloghry served in the Royal Army Medical Corps during the military campaign in Palestine in 1939 and during World War Two

He is entitled to the General Service Medal with clasp Palestine, the Africa Star, the Defence Medal and the War Medal

He was born on November 11th 1912 in Rusheen, Irish Republic. He was the son of James Palmer McCloghry and Matilda McCloghry, of Ballincar, County Sligo, Irish Republic. His father was a veterinarian and he had a brother, Henry Palmer McCloghry.

He entered the Faculty of Medicine of the Belfast University in 1930.

He passed his 1st medical examination in March and June of 1932:

He passed his 2nd medical examination in June of 1933

December 1936: He passed his last medical examination and he graduated from the Faculty of Medicine and he received his Bachelor in the Art of Obstetrics (B.A.O.)

April 23rd, 1937: He enlisted as a Lieutenant in the Royal Army Medical Corps

From May 1st to September 31st he was on his Junior Course at RAMC College in London.

After his graduation from RAMC Medical College and before his service in Palestine, he served as medical officer at the medical reception station in Beverley, Leicester and York.

He left United Kingfom on September 23rd and arrived in Haifa, Palestine on November 22nd.

April 23rd, 1938: He was promoted Captain

He was admitted to hospital on September 14 and stayed there until the 21st. On September 28th he appeared before a medical board in Haifa and was found unfit for duty (50%). He proceeded to United Kingdom October 16th on sick leave for two months.

January 29th, 1939: He disembarked in Haifa, Palestine from the SS Montcalm. On arrival he was appointed as the medical officer of the 1st battalion Royal East Kent Regiment

August 19th: He was appointed medical officer for the West York Regiment in Sarafand, Palestine.

August 29th: He left Palestine for Egypt and was attached to the 3rd Cavalry Field Ambulance

October 6th: He was posted with the 3rd Cavalry Field Ambulance. The unit moved to Abbasia, Egypt on October 11th.

October 15th: He was attached to the 8th Hussars as the medical officer. He was with the regiment until December 18 and then transferred back to the 3rd Cavalry Field Ambulance.

March 3rd, 1940: He proceeded with the Indian Division for an exercise.

March 13th: He was admitted to hospital and was discharged on April 22nd.

March 29th: He was attached to the Rifles Brigade as a medical officer and was admitted to the 2nd Field Ambulance on June 11th and later transferred to the 5th General Hospital. He was found permanently unfit for service on July 1st and to United Kingdom on October 21st.

He died at the Renislow Hospital in Durban, South Africa on March 18th, 1941. He is buried in Stellawood Cemetery in Durban South Africa.

His WW2 medals were despatched to his family in February of 1949

He is commemorated on the Queen’s University (Ireland) War Memorial. The memorial is situated in front of the main University building in University Road, Belfast. He is also commemorated on page 77 of the electronic version of the Book of Remembrance of the University of Belfast.

Monument Belfast University

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Captain Daniel Ellsworth Munn

Captain Daniel Ellsworth Munn served with the 47th battalion and the Royal Canadian Regiment during World War One. He is entitled to the 1914-15 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal.

British War Medal and Victory Medal

Pailthorpe medals

He was born on May 30, 1887 in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, the son of Angus and Sarah Agnes Munn, of New Westminster, British Columbia. He signed his Attestation Paper as a Lieutenant with the 47th Infantry Battalion, on March 24, 1915 in New Westminster,

He named his next-of-kin as his father, Angus, stating that he had previous military service with the 6th Regiment Duke of Connaught’s Own Rifles and the 104th Regiment Westminster Fusiliers of Canada. He was not married and that his trade as that of Estate & Insurance Broker.

The Battalion sailed to United Kingdom on November 13, 1915. He was later transferred to the Royal Canadian Regiment and soon found himself in the French theatre.

He was admitted to No. 9 Field Ambulance suffering from Influenza and Constipation and transferred to Mont des Cats the same day, June 13, 1916. He was again transferred, this time to No. 12 Casualty Clearing Station, where he received further treatment before rejoining his unit on July 7th. He was named Acting Captain on November 8, 1916; however, six months later, he was wounded during a trench raid on December 10, 1916. He was transferred to No. 3 General Hospital at Le Treport with a “slight gunshot wound to his scalp” on December 17th. He was absent from the ceremony where he was to receive his promotion to Captain, as he was still recovering from wounds.

He was evacuated to England via the Hospital Ship Dunluce Castle and transferred to Mrs. Arnold’s, 47 Roland Garden S.W. British Hospital on the 24th. Upon further assessment, he has suffering from gunshot wounds to his right forehead (temporal region) and the second finger on his right hand. He “had headaches for sometime after (the) injury” and by the end of December it was noted that “this Officer suffered the disability. Wounds healed. General health good except for lack of energy.”, although his “nervous system (was) somewhat weakened.” He was discharged on the 30th and deemed “unfit for service” for one month following his discharge, until being cleared for service beginning on January 29, 1917.

The following week, he proceeded overseas to rejoin the Royal Canadian Regiment on February 6, 1917, arriving in France on the 7th. He was transferred to the 3rd Entrenchment Battalion on February 11th and named Temporary Captain on February 28, 1917.

He was in command of “A” Company, stationed on the left side of the ridge, when he was wounded on the latter half of the first day of action, late on April 9 or early on April 10 at the Battle of Vimy Ridge. He was hospitalized at No. 6 Casualty Clearing Station and died from his wounds on April 18, 1917, at the age of 29. He is buried at Barlin Communal Cemetery at Pas de Calais, France.

His father, Angus, received his medals, plaque and scroll, while his mother, Sarah, received his Memorial Cross.

Captain Edwin John Bradley

Captain Edwin John Bradley served in the Royal Army Medical Corps during World War One. He served with the 17th General Hospital and was later attached to the North Midland Field Ambulance with the Territorial Forces. He received the Military Cross with bar and he is entitled to the 1914-15 Star, British War medal and the Victory medal with the oak leaves.

He was born on June 16th, 1890.

He was educated at Dover College, Jesus College in Cambridge and St-Bartholonew Hospital in 1913. He got his M.B and M.D. in 1921.

According to the 1891 British Census he was living with his father and mother in St-James Parish in Dover.

According to the 1901 British Census he was living with his father and mother in St-James Parish in Dover. His father was a merchant and he had two brothers.

According to the 1911 British Census he was living with his cousin and he was a student

He was promoted Lieutenant on January 7th, 1915 (London Gazette)

He was Mentioned-in-dispatches on June 21st, 1916 for his action in Egypt

His bar to his Military Cross was announced in the London Gazette of January 1st, 1919 before the actual announcement of his Military Cross

His Military Cross was authorized on February 15th, 1919 and his citation was published in the London Gazette of July 30th, 1919: “He was in charge of the bearers during the attack on the St. Quentin Canal on September 29th, 1918, and displayed great gallantry and initiative. He went forward and sought a position for an advanced dressing station in Bellenglise when it was being heavily shelled by the enemy, and finally organized collecting and relay posts on a route farther north. His dispositions were most skillful and the rapid evacuation of the wounded was mainly due to the exertions of this officer.”

He was gazed at some point during the war and he would carry the sequels to that for the rest of his life.

Captain Edwin John Bradley medals

Medals

After the war, in 1919, he started a medical practice in Stafford

In 1924 he received his F.R.S.C. from the University of Edinburgh and became a surgeon at the Staffordshire General Infirmary

In October of 1927, he arrived in London from a trip to New York city. He must have been part of some gathering of surgeon and doctor because many surgeons are listed with him on the sailing list.

In the 3rd semester of 1929 he married Nora Thompson. After his marriage he moved to Margate and was appointed surgeon of the general hospital

In 1938 he adopted two boys who flew from the Nazi Germany.

During the Second World War he was the medical officer for the Royal School for Deaf and Dumb Children and the local Home Guard. He was part of the Dunkirk evacuation and treated the wounded British Soldier as they arrived in England.

He was the president of the Margate hospital from until his retirement. Arthritis and chronic bronchitis forced him to retired in 1948.

On October 7th 1948, he sailed with his wife from South Hampton on the Durban Castle to Capetown, South Africa

He with his wife arrived in South Hampton, England on June 3rd, 1949. They had sailed on the Capetown Castle from Port Elizabeth.

He died on March 22nd, 1958 at the Margate General Hospital in Bournemouth.

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography

Captain Lancelot Rodney Warn

Captain Lancelot Rodney Warn served as a Captain in the 30th and 16th battalion with the Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War One. He is entitled to the British War Medal and Victory Medal. He first enlisted as a Private and was given the service number 77373. Also his British War Medal is named A. CAPT. L. R. WARN., meaning that he was not a “full” Captain but rather an Acting Captain.

Born on June 18th, 1881 in Southampton, England

Trade : broker      Religion :  Church of England     Status : single

Height : 5′ 9″   Eyes : blue      Hair : dark brown

1891 census (United Kingdom) listed in the census

1901 census (Canadian census) : He was a waiter in Winnipeg, Canada

He enlisted on November 9th, 1914 in the 30th battalion in Victoria, British Columbia

February 23rd, 1915  :Sailed from Halifax on SS Megantic

April 26th : Arrived in France. Taken on strength with the 16th battalion

November 11th : To be acting corporal

December 10th : Granted 7 days leave

January 17th, 1916 : Proceeded to England for a commission with the 16th battalion

February 2nd  : To be Lieutenant

February 14th : Transferred to the 17th Reserve battalion

February 24th : Transferred to the 30th Reserve battalion

April 21st : Attached to Pioneer training Depot. April 25th : Relieved to attend officer course

March 14th : Appointed Temporary Captain

March 13th, 1918 : He was Brought to the Notice of the Secretary of war for valuable service rendered in connection with the war. Published in the London Times on March 16th

May 1st : To be an instructor

January 9, 1919 : To be attached to headquarter in London

February 4th, : Died at Burdon military hospital in Heymouth from enteric fever. Buried at Southampton Old  cemetery section 49 G. 4. (Hampshire)

Book of Rememberance with Captain Warn name (left column 5th name from the top)

Medals sent to his brother Stanley H Warn 365 Water street Vancouver British Columbia

Plaque sent on August 1922 to his eldest brother Fareham House, Victoria Road Northwich, Cheshire, England. No one entitled to the Memorial Cross

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Captain Lancelor Rodney Warn British War Medal

Flight-Lieutenant Grant Leandre Parent C.D.

Flight-Lieutenant Grant Leandre Parent served as a Navigating Officer with the 424 Squadron Royal Canadian Air Force during World War Two. He flew 21 missions over Germany. He is entitled to the 1939-45 Star, France-Germany Star, Defence Medal, War Medal, Canadian Volunteer Service medal with clasp and the Canadian Decoration. Also he received the Irvin Caterpillar Pin, this pin was given to every airmen to anyone who saved his life by parachuting from a disabled or flaming aircraft.

ccpin

He was born April 24, 1919 in Richmond, Quebec and graduated from McGill University in 1940 with a B.A. in Agricultural.

He commenced his training on June 6th 1943 in Toronto at the No 6 Initial Training School. He served until February 16th, 1946 but since he received the Canadian Decoration he must also has served after that period.

He died January 24, 2012.

I once had access to his flight book and made a transcription of it.

This is the transcription of his flight log book that include his training flights and bombing missions over Germany during WW2.

1944

Trained on Anson (Picture below)

anson_2

April 10th                   Pilot : Sgt Rychlik                 Flight time (day) : 3:40 hour

April 11th                    Pilot : Sgt Stack                     Flight time (day) : 3:05 hrs

April 15th                   Pilot : F/O Bowskill              Flight time (day) : 2:40 hrs

April 20th                   Pilot : Keppie                         Flight time (day) : 3:35 hrs

April 24th                    Pilot : F/S Cundall                 Flight time (day) : 3:30 hrs

April 25th                    Pilot : F/S Dix                          Flight time (day) : 25 min

April 25th                    Pilot : F/S Dix                         Flight time (n) : 2:35 hrs

April 26th                    Pilot : P/O Skipton                Flight time (d) : 30 min

April 26th                    Pilot : P/O Skipton                Flight time (n) : 2:05 hrs

April 27th                    Pilot : F/S Gilmore                Flight time (d) : 2:50 hrs

April 28th                    Pilot : F/O Stapley                 Flight time (d) : 3:30 hrs

May 2nd                      Pilot : F/S Hamilton             Flight time (d) : 3:25 hrs

May 4th                       Pilot : F/O Boyd                    Flight time (d) : 3:15 hrs

Total for the month : 35 hrs 5 min

From July 12th,1943 to November 26th, 1943 he followed his navigator course.

Trained on Wellington (Picture below)

wellington_500

July 16th                     Pilot : W/O Butler                 Flight time (d) : 1:35 hour

July 18th                     Pilot : F/O White                   Flight time (d) : 4:35 hrs

July 19th                      Pilot : P/O McManus             Flight time (d) : 35 min

July 20th                     Pilot : W/O Butler                 Flight time (d) : 4:55 hrs

July 21st                      Pilot : W/O Butler                 Flight time (d) : 45 min

July 22nd                     Pilot : W/O Butler                 Flight time (d) : 35 min

July 23rd                     Pilot : W/O Butler                 Flight time (d) : 6:00 hrs

July 25th                     Pilot : W/O Butler                 Flight time (d) : 2:20 hrs

July 28th                     Pilot : W/O Butler                 Flight time (d) : 3:00 hrs

July 31st                      Pilot : W/O Butler                Flight time (d) : 1:25 hour

Total for the month : 26 hrs 15 min

August 4th                   Pilot : W/O Butler                 Flight time (d) : 1:45 hour

August 6th                   Pilot : F/O Gray                     Flight time (n) : 1:10 hour

August 7th                   Pilot : W/O Butler                 Flight time (n) : 1:55 hour

August 9th                   Pilot : W/O Butler                 Flight time (n) : 3:00 hrs

August 11th                 Pilot : F/O Clifton                 Flight time (n) : 4:00 hrs

He and his crew had to bailed out of the airplane after engines problems, two members did not have time to exit and died in the plane crash. This is probably the incident for which he received his Irvin Caterpillar Pin.

Total for the month : 11 hrs 50 min

August 23rd                Pilot : F/S Saunders               Flight time (d) : 4:20 hrs

August 25th                 Pilot : F/S Saunders               Flight time (d) : 4:40 hrs

August 28th                 Pilot : F/S Saunders               Flight time (d) : 2:30 hrs

Total for the month : 11 hrs 30 min

The squadron transferred on Lancaster Halifax (picture below)

Halifax-mk3

October 30th,              Pilot : F/O Graham                Flight time ( day) : 2:25 hrs

Commending officer of the Squadron 424 C.C.W. Marshall D.F.C

November 1st              Pilot : F/O Graham                Flight time (d) : 1:45 hrs

November 3rd            Pilot : F/O Graham                Flight time (d)  : 35 min

November 3rd            Pilot : P/O Saunders              Flight time (d) : 3:15 hrs

November 6th             Pilot : F/O Graham                Flight time (d) : 25 min

November 7th             Pilot : F/O Graham                Flight time (d) : 3:15 hrs

November 8th             Pilot : P/O Saunders              Flight time (d) : 2:55 hrs

November 9th             Pilot : P/O Saunders              Flight time (d) : 4:00 hrs

November 12th           Pilot : P/O Saunders              Flight time (d) : 5:20 hrs

November 19th           Pilot : F/O Sherwood             Flight time (d) : 2:30 hrs

November 20th           Pilot : P/O Saunders              Flight time (n) : 2:30 hrs

November 21st             Pilot : P/O Saunders              Flight time (n) : 3:20 hrs

November 23rd           Pilot : F/LT Rogers                Flight time (n) : 6:15 hrs

November 24th           Pilot : P/O Saunders              Flight time (d) : 4:55 hrs

November 25th           Pilot : P/O Walton                 Flight time (n) : 4:15 hrs

Total for the month : 48 hrs 05 min

November 26th, he arrived at 424th squadron in Skipton on Swale, his crew is compose of those persons;

P/O Saunders(pilot)            F/O Parent (navigator)          Sgt Andrews

Sgt Laforce                            Sgt Witham                               Sgt Olafson (rear gunner)

Sgt Ellis

November 29th                     Pilot : P/O Saunders          Flight time: 4:40 hrs

December 2nd                       Pilot : P/O Saunders           Flight time: 1:00 hour

December 4th                       Pilot : P/O Saunders            Flight time: 4:15 hrs

December 5th                        mission # 1                             Objective Soest

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 5:45 hrs  Flight distance : 2081 km

Comments : Moderate flak, one bomb stayed in bomb bay and short petrol

16:24              waiting on the runway

18:14              take off

18:40              near off Barnsley

19:18              Reading, new course 136 o

19:35              Eastbourne

19:50              20.5 km north – west d’Abbeville

20:18              57 km east de Saint – Quentin, new course 20 o

20:50              42 km north – west of Aachen

21:09              44.5 km north of Gladbeck

21:23              bombs dropped on target, altitude 18 000 feet

21:24              new course 222 o

21:42              20 km south of Bonn, new course 272 o

21:55              new course 246 o

22:09              new course 290 o

23:18              12 km north – east of Dunkerque, new course 318 o

00:07              Orfordness, new course 305 o

00:27              landing at Horham

December 6th                                    Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 1:05 hrs              Horham to base

December 12th                      Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 2:55 hrs

December 13th                      Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 1:55 hrs

December 18th                      mission # 2                             Objective Berg

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 6:00 hrs  Flight distance : 2055 km

Comment : Moderate flak

03:25              take off

03:34              near off Barnsley

04:28              Reading

04:45              near Brighton (English coast) new course 168 o

05:18              29 km south of Dieppe, new course103 o

05:52              41 km south of Charleroi, new course 46 o

06:22             bombs dropped on target, altitude 19 000 feet

06:23              new course 301 o

06:28              new course 231 o

07:08              32 km south-west of Charleroi, new course 269 o

07:30              near Beach Head, new course 355 o

07:51              near Reading, new course 355 o

08:25              near off Barnsley

08:49              landing at Hethel

December 23rd                      Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 1:05 hrs              Return to base

Total for the month : 28 hrs 40 min

The squadron transferred on Lancaster (picture below)

Avro_Lancaster

January 4th,1945                    Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 4:15 hrs

January 5th                            mission # 3                             Objective Hannover

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 5:50 hrs  Flight distance : 1742 km

Comment : Slight flak

17:01              take off

17:14              Scarborough, new course 88 o

17:55              North Sea

18:19              North sea, new course 125 o

18:37              23 km north – west de Gronigen

18:48              32 km south – east de Gronigen, new course 96 o

19:11              32 km south-east de Bremen, new course 143 o

19:21            bombs dropped on target, altitude 18 500 feet, new course 222 o

19:31              course 306 o

19:42              32 km south – east d’Osnabrück

19:59              course 280 o

20:33              6 km north of La Haye, course 295

21:05              Southwold

21:49              near Doncaster

22:06              landing

January 6th                            mission # 4                             Objective Hanau

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 7:30 hrs  Flight distance : 1975 km

Comment : Slight flak

15:48              take off

16:02              near off Doncaster

16:41              Reading

17:23              25 km north – west of Dieppe, new course 89 o

17:58              50 km north – east de Saint – Quentin

18:25              44.5 km south of Liege, new course 66 o

18:58              new course 148 o

19:07              Frankfort

19:10             Bombs dropped on target, altitude 19 500 feet

19:15              37 km south of Frankfort, new course 292 o

19:31              44.5 km south of Koblenz, new course 241 o

19:42              25 km south of Kier, new course 296

19:57              37 km west of Luxembourg, new course 319 o

20:21              30 km west de Charleroi

20:42              40 km north – west de Lille

21:08              Cork (English coast)

21:58              near off Doncaster

22:14              landing

January 22nd                          Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 3:00 hrs

January 26th                           Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 3:05 hrs

January 28th                          mission # 5                             Objective Stuggart

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 7:15 hrs  Flight distance : 2412 km

Comment : Slight flak

The Intelligence Officer who was responsible to debrief him made this comment «if you don’t like this, complain to me»

19:19              take off

20:17              near Doncaster

20:55              Reading, new course 136 o

21:12              near Beachy Head

21:23              16 km north-east of Dieppe

21:58              25 km north-east of Paris, new course 80 o

23:06              19 km east of Saarbrucken, new course 81 o

23:30              44 km south-east Mannheim, new course 178 o

23:38             bombs dropped on target, altitude 19 500 feet

23:40              10 km south of Stuggart, new course 273 o

23:41              new course 326 o

23:51              38 km north of Strasbourg

00:24              new course 292 o

01:02              25 km north-east of Paris, new course 334 o

01:56              16 km north-east of Dieppe

02:16              Beach Head

04:09              Landing

January 29th                           Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 50 min

Total for the month : 31 hrs 45 min

February 11th                         Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 35 min

February 13th                         Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 1:35 hrs

February 14th                         Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 3:30 hrs

February 15th                        Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 5:25 hrs

February 18th                         Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 15 min

February 20th                         mission # 6                             Objective Dorthund

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 6:40 hrs  Flight distance : 1787 km

Comment : Moderate to heavy flak

21:35              take off

22:19              near off Barnsley

22:59              Reading

23:17              Eastbourne

23:35              19 km north – west of Abbeville

23:41              19 km south – east of Abbeville, new course 91 o

00:28              52 km south – east of Charleroi, new course 17 o

00:50              35 km north of Liège, new course 88 o

01:05              Remscheid, new course 32 o

01:14             bombs dropped on target, altitude 18 500 feet

01:17              19.5 km north-west de Dortmund, new course 312

01:22              30 km south-west of Munster, new course 276 o

01:32              33 km north-west of Gladbeck, new course 238 o

02:05              19 km south of Bruxelles, new course 277 o

02:41              24 km south of Boulogne, new course 307

02:57              English coast

03:18              Reading

03:55              near Barnsley

04:08              landing

February 21st             mission # 7                             Objective Duisberg

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 6:30 hrs  Flight distance : 1183 km

Comment : Moderate to heavy flak and oxygen system failure

19:58              take off

20:14              near off Doncaster

20:59              near Reading

21:20              Eastbourne

21:39              20 km north – west of Abbeville

21:46              15 km south – east of Abbeville, new course 34 o

22:26              25 km east of Charleroi

22:44              31.75 km west of Aachen

23:04             bombs dropped on target, altitude 18 000 feet

23:05              new course 285 o

23:15              new course 220 o

23:25              31.75 km north – west of Liège, new course 256 o

23:40              25 km north – east of Charleroi, new course 281 o

23:59              Lille

00:15              Boulogne

00:33              15 km north – east of Eastbourne

00:53              Reading

01:31              Doncaster

01:44              landing

February 24th                         Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 3:35 hrs              Sea search

February 26th                         Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 3:00 hrs

Total for the month : 31 hrs 05 min

 March 1st                              mission # 8                             Objective Mannheim

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 7:20 hrs  Flight distance : 1351 km

Comment : Slight heavy flak

12:17              take off

12:32              Doncaster

13:13              Reading

13:25              Portsmouth

13:30              over the English channel, new course 84 o

14:01              19.5 km north of Abbeville

14:07              12 km north – east of Abbeville

14:52              4 km south – east of Luxembourg

15:14             bombs dropped on target, altitude 18 500 feet

15:15              new course 96 o

15:20              25 km south – east of Manheim, new course 267

15:56              23 km north – east of Nancy, new course 313

17:12              6.35 km south – west of Ostende (Dutch coast)

17:39              Southwold (English coast), new course 313

18:24              Doncaster

18:40              landing

March 2nd                              mission # 9                             Objective Cologne

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 5:55 hrs  Flight distance : 1754 km

Comment : Slight heavy flak and the objective was probably never reached

07:41              take off

08:31              Reading, new course 138 o

09:07              Beachy Head, new course 86 o

09:13              16 km south of Boulogne

09:38              19 km south of Charleroi, new course 40 o

10:00              left Belgium, new course 102 o

10:12              bombs dropped on target, altitude 19 000 feet

10:13              new course 213 o

10:20              12 km south of Bonn new course 285 o

11:30              25 km north of Charleroi, new course 329 o

12:00              over Ostende, left the coast of France, new course 308 o

12:44              Southwold, new course 351 o

12:54              landing

March 5th                               mission # 10               Objective Chemnitz

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 9:00 hrs  Flight distance : 1796 km

Comment : No flak

17:18              take off

17:32              near Doncaster

18:08              near Reading, new course 128 o

18:28              near Eastbourne

18:47              21 km north – west of Abbeville

18:54              15 km south-east of Abbeville, new course 84 o

19:38              new course 61 o

20:16              19 km north-west of Koblenz

20:56              new course 145 o

21:34              30 km north – west of Halle, new course 86 o

21:48              25 km north – east of Leipzig

21:57              25 km south – east of Leipzig

21:59             bombs dropped on target, altitude 15 500 feet

22:01              17 km au south -east of Chemnitz, new course 257 o

22:13              new course 305 o

22:36              new course 238 o

22:57              30 km south – east of Darmstadt

00:53              15 km south – east of Amiens, new course 294 o

01:00              21 km north – west of Abbeville

01:22              near of Eastbourne

01:45              near off Reading

02:31              near off Doncaster

02:48              landing

March 6th                               Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 55 min    Return to base

March 7th                               mission # 11               Objective Dessau

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 8:45 hrs  Flight distance : 3025 km

Comment : Slight to heavy flak, large belt of search light before T and four air crafts down

17:07              take off

17:23              near off Barnsley

18:07              Reading, new course 140 o

18:26              Beachy Head, new course 139 o

18:47              16 km north-east of Dieppe, new course 88 o

19:37              new course 42 o

20:23              19 km north of Cologne, new course 63 o

21:11              new course 34 o

21:42              32 km south of Salzwedel near Elbe Channel, new course 72 o

21:57              19 km west de Brandenburg, new course 184 o

22:07             bombs dropped on target, altitude 16 000 feet

22:10              12 km north of Halle, new course 210 o

22:28              new course 180 o

22:44              new course 250 o

23:08              44 km west of Stuggart, new course 301 o

00:50              50 km west of Chalons sur Marne, new course 322 o

01:57              Pointe Haut banc

Reading

Landing

March 8th                               Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 1:20 hrs  Return to base

March 11th                             mission # 12               Objective Essen

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 5:45 hrs  Flight distance : 2100 km

Comment : Slight flak

12:06              take off

12:22              near Barnsley

13:07              Reading

13:30              Eastbourne, new course 139 o

13:51              19 km north-west of Abbeville, new course 98 o

14:12              25 km north-west of Saint – Quantin

14:34              27 km south-east of Charleroi, new course 51 o

15:04              Gladback

15:15              bombs dropped on target, altitude 19 000 feet

15:16              new course 321 o

15:20              12 km west of Gladbeck, new course 260 o

15:49              10 km south of Bruxelles, new course 297 o

16:07              19 km south of Ostende, left the coast of France, new course 341 o

16:34              Southwold, new course 313 o

17:11              near Barnsley

17:23              landing

March 12th                             mission # 13               Objective Dortmund

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 6:45 hrs

Comment : Slight flak

March 14th                             mission # 14               Objective Zweibrucken

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 6:35 hrs  Flight distance : 1265 km

Comment : Moderate to heavy flak

17:13              take off

17:28              near off Doncaster

18:13              Reading

18:35              near d’Eastbourne

18:55              19.5 km north – east of Abbeville

19:03              Amiens

19:45              + de 50 km north – east of Chalons sur Marne

19:55              new course 95 o

20:07              25 km west of Saarbrucken

20:16              bombs dropped on target, altitude 12 800 feet, new course 158 o

20:19              19.5 km south – east of Saarbrucken, new course 237 o

20:34              25 km south – east of Nancy, new course 306 o

21:50              Amiens

21:57              19.5 km north – west of Abbeville

22:15              near of Eastbourne

22:36              Reading

23:14              Doncaster

23:27              landing

March 15th                             mission # 15               Objective Hagen

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 6:40 hrs  Flight distance : 2356 km

Comment : Moderate to heavy flak, two aircrafts down and many fighters

17:18              take off

17:35              Doncaster

18:23              Reading

18:45              Eastbourne

19:05              21 km north – east of Abbeville, new course 98 o

19:36              25 km south – west of Charleroi, new course 53 o

19:59              course 120 o

20:12              25 km west of Bonn, course 179 o

20:23              37 km east of Cologne, course 348 o

20:32             bombs dropped on target, altitude 19 000 feet

20:33              6 km north of Hagen, course 307 o

20:42              8.5 km east of Krefeld, course 253 o

20:59              course 240 o

21:19              25 km south – east of Charleroi, course 274 o

21:50              21 km north – east of Abbeville, new course 316 o

22:07              Eastbourne

22:25              Reading

23:03              Doncaster

23:16              landing

March 16th                             Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 1:15 hrs              Practice bombing

New commanding officer R.W. Norris

March 29th                             Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 1:55 hrs

March 31st                             mission # 16               Objective Hamburg

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 5:30 hrs  Flight distance : 1419 km

Comment : Heavy flak over Hamburg, four aircrafts down over Hamburg – two collided and many fighters

6:47              take off

6:58              Scarborough

7:33              between England and Holland

7:51              Island of Texel (Holland), new course 107 o

8:10              20 km south – east of Leeuwarden

8:37              32 km south of Bremen, new course 32 o

8:56             Bombs dropped on target, altitude 18 000 feet

9:00              24 km north –west of Hamburg, new course 319 o

9:13              near Kaiser Wilhem Channel, new course 271 o

9:23              Coast Norwegia, new course 274 o

9:39              21 km south of the island of Heligoland (North sea), new course 278 o

10:28              North sea

11:38              Scarborough

11:52              landing

Total for the month : 67 hrs 20 min

April 4th                                  mission # 17               Objective Leuna (Merseberg)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 9:00 hrs

Comment : Synthetic oil plant and Moderate to heavy flak

April 8th                                  mission # 18               Objective Hamburg

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 5:55 hrs

Comment : Moderate to heavy flak

April  9th                                Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 45 min    Return to base

April 10th                                mission # 19                                       Objective Leipzig

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 8:00 hrs  Flight distance : 1309 km

Comment : Moderate predicted flak, unable to drop bomb and hit by flak F/O Saunders hit in left eye

13:59              take off

14:17              near off Doncaster

15:13              Orfordness

15:45              12,5 km north of Bruges

16:00              19 km east of Ghent, new course 81 o

16:16              36 km east of Antwerp

16:32              44,5 km west of Duisberg

17:02              30 km south of Osnabruick, new course 96 o

17:04              11 km north of Halberstad

17:52              15 km east of Halle

18:02             bombs dropped on target, altitude 16 500 feet

18:06              19 km south east of Leipzig, new course 181 o

18:10              23 km north – west of Chemnitz, new course 256 o

18:30              31,75 km south of Erfuit

18:54              42 km north – east of Frankfort

19:17              37 km west of Koblenz, new course 286 o

19:51              21 km west of Bruxelles

20:02              Weastkapelle

20:31              32 km from the English coast

20:50              Boston

21:04              Doncaster

21:15              landing

April 16th                                mission # 20               Objective Schwandorf

Flight time: 8:50 hrs

Comment : Moderate to heavy flak, Hydraulic system failure and bombs door open on return

April 18th                               Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 4:0 hrs

April 19th                               Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 2:30 hrs

April 22nd                               mission # 21               Objective Bremen

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 5:20 hrs  Flight distance : 1376 km

16:36              take off

16:50              Scarborough

17:07              1/4 of the English Channel crossed

17:33              2/3 of the English Channel crossed

17:53              near the coast of Holland, new course 80 o

18:22              new course 28 o

18:44              19 km south – west of Wesermunde, course 141 o

18:52             bombs dropped on target, altitude 17 800 feet

18:54              15 km south – east of Bremen, course 252 o

19:08              22 km north of Osnabrück, new course 300 o

19:53              left the coast of Holland, new course 305 o

20:15              2/3 of the English Channel to cross

20:48              1/4 of the English Channel to cross

21:10              Scarborough

21:21              landing

Total for the month : 44 hrs 20 min

May 15th                                 Flight (d)

Pilot : F/S Saunders   Flight time: 1:25 hrs

Total for the month : 1 hour 25 min

October 1st : New commanding officer R.P.D. Blagrave

October 15th : Squadron 424 east at Skipton on Swale, Yorks

War time flight

Day 98 hours 40 minutes

Night 104 hours 30 minutes

Total 203 hours 10 minutes

September 6, 1946 : He retired from the army

Following the end of the war Lieutenant Grant L. Parent worked in the Veterans Land Act service for a while (information indicate he was there in 1952 and 1953).

By 1954 he began working for the Ground Observers Corp (GOC)  He was in St. Jerome in 1954 and 1955.

By 1958, still in the GOC, he was stationed in Trois-Rivières, P.Q.. He had one or two trips into the Arctic on an ice breaker at some point probably on the John A. MacDonald, she was launched in 1960, suggesting he was still with GOC in early 60’s

At some point in the 1950‘s he received the Canadian Decoration (12 years of service)

He farmed apples for a while in Hemmingford P.Q.  (apples)

He worked for Domtar in their research centre in Saint Anne de Bellevue P.Q. until late early 80’s; after which he and his wife retired and moved to Ottawa.

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Spring Walker, C.B.E., M.I.D.

Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Spring Walker served in the Royal Army Medical Corps
He was a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (Military). He was also entitled to the Queen’s South Africa Medal with the Orange Free State and Cape Colony clasps, the 1914 Star with clasp, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal .

He was born January 6th 1876 at Glanbehy, County of Kerry

April 5th, 1894: He is listed as a Midshipman on the Royal Navel Reserve List

July 29th, 1898: He received his diploma for Licentiate Midwifing from the Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland. He is listed as living at the Hurricane Lodge, Glenbeigh, and County of Kerry

April 25th, 1900: He was promoted Lieutenant in the Royal Army Medical Corps

June 18th: He sailed to South Africa (from the London Times) with the 9th General Hospital

November 14th: He embarked on the HMS Assaye. He had been invalidated. He arrived in South Hampton, United Kingdom on December 5th (from the London Times)

He served in India from 1902 to 1903

He was promoted Captain in April of 1903

He was sick from February 1904 and was back at his rank on October 19th, 1904. During that period he was probably sent back to United Kingdom.

He went back to India and served from 1905 to 1908.

March 29th, 1908: He was promoted Major and was stationed at the Magistrate Department Cantonment in India.

April 25th, 1912: He was promoted Major

September 13th, 1914: He disembarked in France with the 26th Field Ambulance (British Expeditionary Forces)

He was promoted the Assistant-Director of the 6th Division at some point during the war.

February 17th, 1915: He was Mentioned-in-Despatches for the first time.

August 3rd: He arrived on the Island of Malta from England

August 20th: He embarked on HMHS Valdivia and sailed for Mudros Harbour on the small Greek Island of Lemnos. At the time the Island of Mudros was used a rear medical base for the sick and wounded of the Gallipoli campaign. The number of casualties was so high Eastern Campaign, especially in the Dardanelles, that the British putted a lot of resources to help reduce the pressure on the medical units.

September 19th: He returned from the Island of Mudros to the Island of Malta.

January 5th, 1916: He sailed back to England.

December 26th, 1917: He was promoted Lieutenant-Colonel

May 30th 1919: He was awarded the Order of the British Empire (Commander level) for valuable service in connection with the war (London Gazette June 3rd)

July 10th: He was Mentioned-in-Despatches for a second time.

July 29th: He was Mentioned-in-Despatches for a third time. In a period of 5 months he was decorated three times for his valuable services in connection with the war. It is rare for someone to receive so many official recognitions in such a short period, although 1919 was the period to close the book for WW1 decoration.

September 9th: He applied for his 1914 Star

May 15th, 1920: He retired from the Army. He was again taken off strength for medical reasons from May 15th, 1920 until December 20th, 1920.

December 20th, 1922: he was taken off the Officer Reserve List and retired from pay

1927: He is listed as living at Woodquest, Crosshaven, County of Cork in the Medical Register. He lived there until his death in 1941.

June 24th 1941: He died Ripley Lodge Caragh Lake in Kerry County

He had one daughter named Marjorie Rose

click on the image to enlarge

Death

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Lieutenant-Colonel John Warwick Illius

Lieutenant-Colonel John Warwick Illius served in the Indian Medical Service during WW1 and after the war in the Balkans, Egypt, Persia and the Persian Gulf. He is entitled to the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal, the Victory Medal, the General Service Medal 1918 clasp South Persia and the India General Service Medal 1908 clasp Waziristan 1919.

October 9th 1875: He was born in Campo Grande, Bahia, Brazil. he is the son of John Guillermo and Ellen Illius, Superintendent of the Bahia Steam Navigation Company. He had a brother Henry Warkwick that was most probably his twin.

1881 United Kingdom Census: He was living with his parents at 48 St John’s Road Tonbridge, Kent, England. He had 2 brothers and 4 sisters. He was in a wealthy family they had one nurse, one housemaid, one cook and one governess.

1891 United Kingdom Census: Living at 142 Halloween Bannisters Road Millbrook, Hampshire, England. They only had one maid

February 1900: He received his medical training at St. Bart’s and gained the Membership of the Royal College of Surgeons (M.R.C.S.) 1900 and Licentiate of the Royal College of Physicians  (L.R.C.P.) London. His address was 13 Esplanade Road, Bombay India

July 26th, 1902: He entered the Indian Medical Service and was appointed a Lieutenant.

July 26th, 1905: He was promoted Captain.

1912: He was appointed a Fellowship of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh

January 26th, 1914: He was promoted Major

January 1922: He was appointed Lieutenant-Colonel. That year also saw the birth of his son Andrew Bruce Warwick Illius

He served in the WW1 in France and Belgium, 1914-15;

He served in the Balkans and Egypt in 1915-16.

He served in Persia and the Persian Gulf between 1916 and 1919

He retired from the Indian Army on 4 September 1925.

1927: According to the Medical List of that year he was a partner of the Coulson, Buckley & Illius Medical Practice in Temple Combe, Somerset.

August 24th 1943: His son Officer Andrew Bruce Warwick Illius, 156 Squadron, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve was killed over Berlin at the age of 21.

September 10th, 1946: He died at the Ashs Prior Nursing Home in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. He left a sum of 23 610 £ to his wife Marion Elizabeth Fleming. He is buried in Cheltenahm Cemetery in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. His wife died on May 29th, 1976 and is buried with him.

Pictures of his gravestone Cheltenahm Cemetery

click on the images to enlarge

Gravestone 2

Gravestone 3

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Lieutenant Julian Garth Harley

Lieutenant Julian Garth Harley served with the Royal Army Medical Corps in Borneo and Northen Ireland. He is entitled to the General Service Medal clasps Borneo and Northern Ireland. He is also entitled to the Good Conduct and Long Service Medal EII (Bar Regular Army). His service number was 23948593.

Enlisted early 1960’s

He served in North Borneo, Sarawak or Brunei between 24 December 1962 and 11 August 1966. This conflict claimed the lives of 114 Commonwealth personnel killed, 180 wounded.

He was a drill instructor at R.A.M.C. depot in late 70’s and later became the Chief Drill Instructor there.

He must have served for at least  30 days’ in Northen Ireland after 14 August 1969.

March 6th 1990 : Promoted from Warrant Officer class I to Lieutenant on March 6th, 1990 with the Territorial Army (R.A.M.C.). probably after retiring from the Regular Force

March 6th,1991 : Probation confirmed

May 26th, 1993: To be a Lieutenant with Territorial Army group A

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Lieutenant-Colonel Charles Henry Carr

Lieutenant- Colonel Charles Henry Carr served in the Royal Army Medical Corps during World War One and in what was then India in 1919. He is entitled to the 1914 Star, the British War medal, The Victory Medal and the India General Service Medal clasp North-West Frontier 1919.

He was born on 20th September 1873 inYoughal, County Cork

March 21st, 1898: He registered for the first time as a surgeon. He graduated from the University of Dublin

May 30th, 1900: He was promoted Lieutenant

1901-1902: He served in West Africa

May 30th 1903: Promoted Captain

1903-1908: He served in India

1911 United Kingdom Census: Married to Edith France Carr and they had no children. He was living in Handover, Hampshire.

May 30th 1912: Promoted Major and he was stationed at the Commanding Station Hospital in Jullunder, India.

1914: His son, Charles B. Argaville DeVoeux, was born that year. He was married with Edith Frances Carr.

August 17th 1914: He disembarked in France.

August 9th 1915: He arrived from England.

1916 : At St David’s Military Hospital Malta.

May 2nd 1917 Mobilised St David’s Military Hospital as No 62 General Hospital, and brought its strength to war time establishment.

July 4th: He embarked for Salonika in command of No 62 General Hospital on the HMTS Ship Abbassieh which sailed out of the Grand Harbour escorted by HMS Aster and HMS Azalea. Both escorts struck mines eleven miles out of Malta, and HMTS Abbassieh returned to Malta and anchored at Marsaxlokk Harbour.

July 6th: HMT Ship Abbassieh with Nos 61, 62, and 64 General Hospitals sailed out of Marsaxlokk Harbour escorted by two destroyers. The staff was given their first inoculation against cholera.

July 11th: Appointed Acting Lieutenant-Colonel. HMTS Abbassieh arrived at Suda Bay Crete on 9 July, where all the staff were issued with quinine grs X, as prophylaxis against malaria. They arrived at Salonika Harbour, on 11 July 1917. All the women and doctors were transferred to the hospital ship Llandovery Castle.

January 1918: He was serving as Officer Commanding the 62nd General Hospital in Italy when he applied for the 1914 Star in January 1918

April 7th: Promoted Lieutenant-Colonel

January 1920: He was at the Nowshera British Station Hospital in Peshawar, India

September 20th 1928: He was put on Retired Pay

1943 May 31st: His son, Charles B. Argaville DeVoeux, was killed in an accident while serving with to the York and Lancaster Regiment but attached to the 6th Bn The Queen’s Own Royal West Kent Regiment

He died 25th December 1961 in Worthing, Sussex

If you know additional information on this gentleman, please leave me a comment so I can add the information to his small biography.

Books on the Canadian Army Medical Services and Nursing Sister

Over the years I have read many books on the Canadian Army Medical Corps and its member. These books were not meant to be read like a novel and they are not fast page turner, so sometime they are a little bit hard to read BUT they do hold very valuable information on the Canadian Medical Corps and its members who served during peacetime and wartime period.

This is the list of all the books I have read so far on the subject, if you happen to know a book that is not in this list but related to the Canadian Medical service during a war, please let me know so I can add it to this list.

Some of those are available for free and downloadable from the Internet. I have added the link to those e-book.

CORPS HISTORY

WW1

Official history of the Canadian Forces in the Great War 1914-19 – The Medical Services by Sir Andrew McPhail published in 1925. It can be read online by clicking here

The Canadian Army Medical Corps with the Canadian Corps in the last hundred days of the Great War by Colonel A. E. Snell published in 1924. It can be read online by clicking here

The First Canadians in France by F McKelvey-Bell published in 1917

The War Story of the Canadian Army Medical Corps 1914-1915 by Colonel J. G. Adami published in 1916. It can be read online by clicking here or here

Politics and the Canadian Army Medical Corps by Colonel Herbert A. Bruce published in 1919. It can be read online by clicking here

WW2

Official History of the Canadian Medical Services 1939-1945 (2 volumes) by W. R. Feasby published in 1953. You can read volume 1 by clicking here and volume 2 by clicking here

Death their enemy: Canadian Medical Practitioners and War by Bill Rawling published in 2001

A History of the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps: Seventy Years of Service by Colonel G.W.L. Nicholson published in 1977

Post-WW2

The Myriad Challenges of Peace : Canadian Forces Medical Practitioners Since the Second World War by Bill Rawling published in 2004

UNIT HISTORY

No 1 Canadian General Hospital by Kenneth Cameron published in 1928

No 3 Canadian General Hospital in France (author unknown)

No 3 Canadian General Hospital (McGill) 1914-1919 by R. C. Fetherstonhaugh published in 1928

No 4 Canadian Hospital: The Letters of Professor J. J. McKenzie from the Salonika Front by J. J. Mackenzie published in 1933

A history of no 7 (Queen’s) Canadian General Hospital

Battle for life by A.M. Jack Hyatt and Nancy Geddes Poole published in 2004 (history of 10th Canadian Stationary Hospital in WW1 and 10th Canadian General Hospital in WW2)

Stretcher bearer … at the Double by Frederick W. Noyes (history of the 5th Canadian Field Ambulance)

History records of number 8 Canadian Field Ambulance 1915-1913 by Lieutenant –Colonel J. N. Gunn published in 1929 (history of the 8th Canadian Field Ambulance)

Diary of the Eleventh (history of the 11th Canadian Field Ambulance)

The Military Medical Units of Hamilton, Ontario in Peace and War 1900-1990 by A.R.C. Butson published in 1990

Salute to the Air Force Medical Branch by Harold M. Wright published 1999

NURSING SISTER

Canada’s Nursing Sisters by G.W.L. Nicholson published in 1975

Sister heroines: The Roseate Glow of Wartime Nursing 1914-1918 by Marjorie Barron Norris published in 2002

An Officer and a Lady by Cynthya Toman published in 2007

Canadian Foreign Awards to Nursing Service Mentioned-in-Despatches World War I (1914-1919) edited by Jim Wallace in 2001

PERSONAL ACCOUNT – MEMOIRS – BIOGRAPHY

From a Stretcher Handle: The World War 1 Journal and Poems of Pte. Frank Walker published in 2000

Four Score and Ten – Memoirs of a Canadian Nurse (story of Nursing Sister Maude Wilkinson) published in 2003

Lights Out: A Canadian Nursing Sister’s Tale by Katherine M. Wilson-Simmie published in 1981

Nobody Ever Wins a War by Ella Mae Bongard (edited by Eric Scott) published in 1998

Our Bit: Memories of War Service by a Canadian Nursing Sister by Mabel Clint published in 1934

Agnes Warner and the Nursing Sister of the Great War by Agnes Warner (edited by Swawna M. Quinn) published in 2010

The War Diary of Clare Gass 1915-1918 by Clare Gass (edited by Susan Mann) and published in 2000

Margaret MacDonald Imperial Daughter by Susan Mann published in 2005

Never Leave Your head Uncovered: A Canadian Nursing Sister in World War Two by Doris V. Carter published in 1999

The military Nurses of Canada : Recollections of Canadian Military Nurses (3 volumes) by Edith A. Landells published in 1993

Although it was never published as a book, you can find Nursing Sister Helen L. Fowlds letters and diary on the Trent University website. Her letters can be read by clicking here and her diaries can be read by clicking here.

FRENCH BOOK

Dans la tourmente : Deux hôpitaux militaires canadiens-français (1915-1919) by Michel Litalien published in 2003

Briser les ailes de l’ange : Les infirmières militaires canadiennes (1914-1918) by Mélanie Morin-Pelletier published in 2006

Brigade-Surgeon Alfred Henry Anthonisz

Brigade-Surgeon Alfred Henry Anthonisz served in Egypt in 1882 and 1885, he also served during the Boers’ War. He is entitled to the Egypt medal clasp Suakin 1885, the Queen’s South Africa Medal clasp Cape Colony and the Khedive’s Star.

December 22nd, 1844: Born in Colombo, Sri Lanka. He was educated at Colombo Academy and Queen’s College. His parents were Gerard Henricius  Anthonisz and Abigail Elizabeth Wright.

1862: He went to the Calcutta to do his medical studies. After completing his schooling he entered the Ceylon Medical Service Department where he served for two years.

1867: Graduated M.B. and C.M. from the University of Aberdeen

November 11th, 1870: His name appears for the first time in the Medical Register

Between February 20th and 27th 1871: He passed his examination for admission in the Medical Service of the Royal Navy and then entered the army as Staff-Assistant-Surgeon. On April 1st he was sent to Bombay to be stationed there.

September 12th: Married to Cristian Joanna Sim.

September 19th: Appointed Staff-Assistant –Surgeon.

1873: Promoted Surgeon and posted to the 108th Foot Regiment. His first son Alfred George Henry was born that year and would later become a civil surgeon. He died when struck by lightning in South Africa in 1901.

1874: Birth of his daughter Eshel Maud

1876: Birth of his second daughter, Winnifred Maud

1878: Stationed in Bombay

July 19th, 1879: He was elected as a member of the Asiatic Society of Bombay

1880: Birth of his second son, Edward Guy also became a surgeon and served in WW1 with the British Forces

Egypt Campaign

September 1882: Served during the Egypt Campaign in the Tel-El-Kebir Campaign at the Fork Medical Depot. He was back in United Kingdom in December.

April 1st, 1883: Promoted Surgeon Major and stationed in Barbados

June 1885: He was attached to General Graham Force in Suakin in March. He came to United Kingdom in July arriving at Portsmouth on the Troopship Jumna. He was then posted to Devonport.

1888: He was stationed in Barbados

April 1890: Transferred from Bengal to Aldershot, United Kingdom. He took charge of the Third Station Hospital in Aldershot in June.

April 1st, 1891: Promoted Staff Lieutenant-Colonel

May 15th, 1895: Promoted Brigade-Surgeon (Lieutenant-Colonel)

August 21st, 1896: Appointed to officiate the Administrative Medical Staff of the Bengal Army with the temporary rank of Surgeon-Colonel. He was officially appointed in October. In November he is appointed to officiate as Principal Medical Officer in the Oude and Rohilkind District.

April 1897: Transferred from Bengal to Gosport

Boers’ War

October 6th: Arrived in Durban, South Africa onboard the transport ship Breamer Castle with the 1st General Hospital (From the London Times of October 5th). The hospital was later sent to Cape Town South, Africa where they arrived on October 27th. (From the official history book of the Royal Army Medical Corps). He was in charge of the medical function of the hospital that was then moved in Wynberg, South Africa and then opened on October 30th.

December 1899: Promoted to the rank of Colonel.

While in South Africa in the hospital was inspected by Mrs. Richard Chamberlain and he was accused of mismanagement of the hospital. This did create a commotion and it was found that Mrs. Chamberlain had no experience in hospital management so Colonel Anthonisz was later cleared of any wrong-doing

December 24th, 1900: He left South Africa for England onboard the Wakool. He is listed as invalids. (From the London Times of December 24th).

January 1901: He was sent back to Bombay. In June, he then served in India in the Bombay Command and was appointed Principal Medical Officer Secunderabad and Belgaum Districts. In September he was transferred from Bombay to Madras.

December 22nd, 1904: Placed on the Retired Pay

February 17th, 1905: He retired

December 6th, 1907: Departed from London, United Kingdom and sailed to Calcutta, India on board Jelunga with his wife.

October 27th, 1919: Died at Coonoor, Nilgiri Hills, South India.

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Picture of Brigade-Surgeon Alfred Henry Anthonisz  taken before his departure for South Africa.