Category Archives: Royal Army Medical Corps

Captain Michael William Buckingham

Captain Michael William Buckingham served in the Royal Army Medical Corps during the Malaya Campaign and the Malay Peninsula expedition. He is entitled to the General Service Medal 1918 (clasp Malaya), the General Service Medal 1962 (clasp Malay Peninsula) and the Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal.

He was probably born last semester of the 1930

He enlisted in 1948 in the Royal Army Medical Corps

He served in Malaya campaign after 1953

He served as a Warrant Officer class 1 in the Malay Peninsula between 17th August, 1964 to January 13th 1966.

He transferred as a Commissionned Officer and was promoted Lieutenant (rank on his Long Service Medal)

He received his Army Long Service Good Conduct Medal on January 13th 1966

He was promoted to the rank of Captain (non-medical) on November 15th 1969

He retired on December 1st 1976

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Captain Michael William Buckingham medals

Buckingham 1

Lieutenant-Colonel George Johnston Stoney Archer

Lieutenant-Colonel George Johnston Stoney Archer, B.A., M.B., B.Ch., B.A.O. served in the Royal Army Medical Corps during the Boers’ War and World War One. He is entitled to the Queen’s South Africa Medal (clasps Cape Colony, Orange Free State and Transvaal), the King South Africa Medal (clasps South Africa 1901 and 1902), the 1914 Star, The British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

He was born in the no 3rd Ward in Dublin, Ireland on November 15th, 1875. His father George Thompson Archer and his mother Mary Elizabeth Stoney

He received his degree in medicine 1897 from the University of Dublin

He was promoted Lieutenant on July 27th, 1898 (London Gazette)

He married Ethel Mary Beauchamp on September 4th, 1899 in St-Stephen Parish, Dublin, Ireland. His address at the time was 4 Longfield Terrace North Circular Road. Together they will have four children.

During the Boers War he served with the 5th and 7th Stationary Hospital

He was promoted Captain in on July 27th, 1901 (London Gazette)

He was promoted Major on April 27th, 1910 (London Gazette)

He disembarked in France on August 19th, 1914.

He was promoted Lieutenant-Colonel on March 2nd, 1915 (London Gazette)

He was placed on the ill-heal list on December 23rd, 1920 and he retired on October 25th, 1921 due to his illness contracted while on service. (London Gazette)

In May of 1923, he applied for the Soldier Wound Badge and it was refused to him. This badge was given to soldiers who received wounds or illness during the war

On January 3rd, 1929 he left South Hampton, United Kingdom with his wife on the ship Johan de Wit for Batavia, Java. He is listed as a Lieutenant-Colonel (still). They came back to United Kingdom at the end of the month.

He also bought a piece on land in Gloucestershire in the same year

He died on November 5th 1955 in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire leaving 27293 £.

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Captain Charles Edward McCloghry

Captain Charles Edward McCloghry served in the Royal Army Medical Corps during the military campaign in Palestine in 1939 and during World War Two

He is entitled to the General Service Medal with clasp Palestine, the Africa Star, the Defence Medal and the War Medal

He was born on November 11th 1912 in Rusheen, Irish Republic. He was the son of James Palmer McCloghry and Matilda McCloghry, of Ballincar, County Sligo, Irish Republic. His father was a veterinarian and he had a brother, Henry Palmer McCloghry.

He entered the Faculty of Medicine of the Belfast University in 1930.

He passed his 1st medical examination in March and June of 1932:

He passed his 2nd medical examination in June of 1933

December 1936: He passed his last medical examination and he graduated from the Faculty of Medicine and he received his Bachelor in the Art of Obstetrics (B.A.O.)

April 23rd, 1937: He enlisted as a Lieutenant in the Royal Army Medical Corps

From May 1st to September 31st he was on his Junior Course at RAMC College in London.

After his graduation from RAMC Medical College and before his service in Palestine, he served as medical officer at the medical reception station in Beverley, Leicester and York.

He left United Kingfom on September 23rd and arrived in Haifa, Palestine on November 22nd.

April 23rd, 1938: He was promoted Captain

He was admitted to hospital on September 14 and stayed there until the 21st. On September 28th he appeared before a medical board in Haifa and was found unfit for duty (50%). He proceeded to United Kingdom October 16th on sick leave for two months.

January 29th, 1939: He disembarked in Haifa, Palestine from the SS Montcalm. On arrival he was appointed as the medical officer of the 1st battalion Royal East Kent Regiment

August 19th: He was appointed medical officer for the West York Regiment in Sarafand, Palestine.

August 29th: He left Palestine for Egypt and was attached to the 3rd Cavalry Field Ambulance

October 6th: He was posted with the 3rd Cavalry Field Ambulance. The unit moved to Abbasia, Egypt on October 11th.

October 15th: He was attached to the 8th Hussars as the medical officer. He was with the regiment until December 18 and then transferred back to the 3rd Cavalry Field Ambulance.

March 3rd, 1940: He proceeded with the Indian Division for an exercise.

March 13th: He was admitted to hospital and was discharged on April 22nd.

March 29th: He was attached to the Rifles Brigade as a medical officer and was admitted to the 2nd Field Ambulance on June 11th and later transferred to the 5th General Hospital. He was found permanently unfit for service on July 1st and to United Kingdom on October 21st.

He died at the Renislow Hospital in Durban, South Africa on March 18th, 1941. He is buried in Stellawood Cemetery in Durban South Africa.

His WW2 medals were despatched to his family in February of 1949

He is commemorated on the Queen’s University (Ireland) War Memorial. The memorial is situated in front of the main University building in University Road, Belfast. He is also commemorated on page 77 of the electronic version of the Book of Remembrance of the University of Belfast.

Monument Belfast University

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Captain Edwin John Bradley

Captain Edwin John Bradley served in the Royal Army Medical Corps during World War One. He served with the 17th General Hospital and was later attached to the North Midland Field Ambulance with the Territorial Forces. He received the Military Cross with bar and he is entitled to the 1914-15 Star, British War medal and the Victory medal with the oak leaves.

He was born on June 16th, 1890.

He was educated at Dover College, Jesus College in Cambridge and St-Bartholonew Hospital in 1913. He got his M.B and M.D. in 1921.

According to the 1891 British Census he was living with his father and mother in St-James Parish in Dover.

According to the 1901 British Census he was living with his father and mother in St-James Parish in Dover. His father was a merchant and he had two brothers.

According to the 1911 British Census he was living with his cousin and he was a student

He was promoted Lieutenant on January 7th, 1915 (London Gazette)

He was Mentioned-in-dispatches on June 21st, 1916 for his action in Egypt

His bar to his Military Cross was announced in the London Gazette of January 1st, 1919 before the actual announcement of his Military Cross

His Military Cross was authorized on February 15th, 1919 and his citation was published in the London Gazette of July 30th, 1919: “He was in charge of the bearers during the attack on the St. Quentin Canal on September 29th, 1918, and displayed great gallantry and initiative. He went forward and sought a position for an advanced dressing station in Bellenglise when it was being heavily shelled by the enemy, and finally organized collecting and relay posts on a route farther north. His dispositions were most skillful and the rapid evacuation of the wounded was mainly due to the exertions of this officer.”

He was gazed at some point during the war and he would carry the sequels to that for the rest of his life.

Captain Edwin John Bradley medals

Medals

After the war, in 1919, he started a medical practice in Stafford

In 1924 he received his F.R.S.C. from the University of Edinburgh and became a surgeon at the Staffordshire General Infirmary

In October of 1927, he arrived in London from a trip to New York city. He must have been part of some gathering of surgeon and doctor because many surgeons are listed with him on the sailing list.

In the 3rd semester of 1929 he married Nora Thompson. After his marriage he moved to Margate and was appointed surgeon of the general hospital

In 1938 he adopted two boys who flew from the Nazi Germany.

During the Second World War he was the medical officer for the Royal School for Deaf and Dumb Children and the local Home Guard. He was part of the Dunkirk evacuation and treated the wounded British Soldier as they arrived in England.

He was the president of the Margate hospital from until his retirement. Arthritis and chronic bronchitis forced him to retired in 1948.

On October 7th 1948, he sailed with his wife from South Hampton on the Durban Castle to Capetown, South Africa

He with his wife arrived in South Hampton, England on June 3rd, 1949. They had sailed on the Capetown Castle from Port Elizabeth.

He died on March 22nd, 1958 at the Margate General Hospital in Bournemouth.

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Private William Hancock

Private William Hancock served in the Army Hospital Corps. He is entitled to the South Africa medal 1877- 1879 with clasp 1879, the Egypt Medal with the clasp Tel-El-Kebir and the 1882 Khedive’s Star

He enlisted in the 100th Foot Regiment on August 7th 1873

He was transferred to the Army Hospital Corps on February 15th 1877

He was posted to the Cape on January 30th 1878

He was paid the General Depot at Pietermaritzburg from January 10th 1878 to November 30th of the same year.

He was posted to Utrecht

He received his pay via the 90th Light Infantry Regiment from November 1st 1878 until April 1st 1879

He served against the Zulus in 1879

He was back in United Kingdom on June 18th 1882 and served in Egypt in September of that year

He was discharged on August 6th 1885

Private William Hancock medals. His Egypt Medal is missing from the group. I would appreciate if anyone with information on the whereabouts of the medal could let me know.

William Hancock medals

Private P J Walsh and Staff-Sergeant G J Richards

Private P J Walsh served in Palestine before and in WW2 with the Royal Army Medical Corps. He is entitled to the General Service Medal (clasp Palestine)  1939-45 Star, Africa Star, Defence Medal and 1939-45 War Medal. His enlistment number 7260934

He served in Palestine in 1939. He was stationed at Reception Station in Jerusalem

He served in Europe and in North-Africa during WW2

According to the medals roll, he received his General Service Medal in 1959 which is consistent with the wide shoulder suspension of the medal and it lists him as a sergeant.

Staff-Sergeant G J Richards served during WW2 and in the Malaya Campaign in the 1950 with Royal Army Medical Corps. He is entitled to the 1939/45 Star, Burma Star, Defence medal, War Medal, the General Service Medal (clasp Malaya) and the Efficiency Medal (bar Territorial). His enlistment number was 7356346.

Served in Burma during WW2

A period of 12 years of service is needed to get the Efficiency Medal (war time count for double if he was in the army before the war started). He received his EM between 1937 and 1948, probably received it shortly after WW2 at the latest. The EM Geo VI type 1 was issued before 1948.

Served in Malaya, probably between 1950-1953 (Geo VI type 2), and his GSM is a late issue (wide shoulder suspension), he was probably out of the army by then.

Doctor Grace Winifred Pailthorpe

Doctor Grace Winifred Pailthorpe served with the French Red Cross during WW1. She is entitled to the British War and Victory Medals. What makes her story more interesting she was also an artist, a surrealist painter.

She was born in Sussex on July 29th, 1883

She trained for medicine, graduating as a M.B. and B.S. in 1914

1914-18 She served as Doctor with the French Red Cross and Scottish Women’s Hospitals, entering France in February 1915.

Her medals were sold at Dix Noonman in December 2012

1918-22 She worked as District Medical Officer in Western Australia

December 1921: She arrived in Vancouver, Canada on the Makura from Honolulu, Hawai

1922: She returned to England and took up the study of Psychological Medicine. She received her M.D. from the University of Durham in 1925.

1930: Her exhibits in the main Surrealist exhibitions and in 1938 publishes The Scientific Aspect of Surrealism which was probably instrumental in her expulsion from the group in 1940

1932 She published two books What we put in prison and in preventive and rescue homes and Studies in the Psychology of Delinquency. This brought her brought her worldwide acclaim. Her study of delinquency and sets up the first institute in the world devoted to the scientific treatment of delinquency, later known as the Portman Clinic

1935: She met Reuben Mednikoff and together they embark on psychological art research. She began her research into automatic drawing and painting. In her article The scientific aspect of surrealism she argued that the final goals of surrealism and psychoanalysis were the same: the liberation of the individual. Through surrealist techniques unconscious fantasies could be set free and subsequently reintegrated with the conscious. They have been qualified as one of the strangest and eeriest couples in British art

In 1936 she took part in the International Surrealist Exhibition in London, where her work from a series titled The Ancestors was greatly admired by André Breton.

One of her painting done in 1937

During the Second World War, she and her husband lived in Vancouver, Canada, where she worked as a psychoanalyst.

July 29th, 1940: She arrived in Liverpool, England on the Britanic from New-York, United States

1941: In her paper Deflection of energy, as a result of birth trauma was published, in which she pleaded for greater attention to be paid to the trauma of birth in the analysis.

In 1947 she returned to England and practiced at the beginning of the 1950s as a psychoanalyst in London. In later years her painting turned to Eastern mysticism – to the detriment of surrealism, because she bequeathed her large collection of surrealist art to a yoga society, which burned it.

She initiated the establishment of the world’s first clinic for the psychological treatment of prison inmates. Soon after the Institute for the Scientific Treatment of Delinquency was formed – now known as the Portman Clinic.
from 1940 to 1971 She continued her painting and research in combination with Reuben Mednikoff until their deaths within six months of each other in 1971

She died in July 1971 at the age of 87 years.

Private George White

Private George White served in the Medical Staff Corps during the Egyptian Campaign. He is entitled to the undated Egypt Medal with the clasp The Nile 1884-85 and the Khedive’s star

Religion: Church of England     Trade: porter         Eyes: Hazel

Hair: light brown          Height:5’10”    Weight: 124 lbs.

He was born in Greenwich, London in November of 1864

He enlisted on January 15th 1884

From January 15th 1884 to November 4th he served at home (United Kingdom)

March 31st: He was appointed 2nd class Orderly

From November 5th 1884 to March 19th, 1887 he served in Egypt

From March 20th 1887 to January 14th 1896 he served at home (United Kingdom)

He was discharged in 1896 completing his 12 years short service period

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Egypt medal clasp The Nile 1884-85 and the Khedive’s Star

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White-G

Private White Attestation of Short Service page 1

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Private White Attestation of Short Service page 2

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Major Thomas George Buchanan, M.I.D.

Major Thomas George Buchanan served in the Royal Army Medical Corps during World War One. He is entitled to the 1914/15 Star, British War Medal and the Victory medal. He ws Mentionned -in-Despatches and he wore the oakleaf emblem on the ribbon of his Victory Medal.

World War One trio with the Mentionned -in-Despatches oakleaf emblem (click to enlarge)

Buchanan 1

He was born on the November 20th 1883 in Knocknarea, Magheragall, County of Antrim, Ireland. His father was Thomas Buchanan and his mother Maria Jane Watson

May 14th, 1908: He passed Bachelor of Medicine, Surgery & Obstetrics at the Royal University of Ireland.

1911 United Kingdom Census: He is listed as single and a house surgeon at the General Infirmary, Burton on Trent, England

June 17th, 1913: He was commissioned as a Lieutenant in the Field Ambulance of the North Midland Mounted Brigade

His address in the Medical Register is 275 Branstone Road, Burton-on-Trent.

Photo of Major Thomas George Buchanan (probably right after enlistment)

Thomas George Buchanan 1a

September 15, 1915: He Married Evelyn Kathleen Julia Macfaren Myhill at The Church of St Stephen, Norwich, Norfolk, England.

September 24th: He transferred the Territorial Army to the Royal Army Medical Corps and promoted to the rank of Major.

October: He entered France

He served in the Middle-East and was attached to the Royal Artillery. He was probably transferred in the Middle-East in 1917

At one point he was presumed dead and his wife received a telegram to that effect. Two days later she received another telegram stating that her husband was well and alive. At some point someone told the University of Dublin that Major Buchanan had been killed in action but never got back to them that this was a mistake. The result of that, Thomas George Buchanan is listed as a casualty of war on the Remembrance Plaque in honor of the university’s students who died during WW1. In an account written by his grand-son, later in life, Mr. Buchanan was amused by that historical error.

Photo of the Memorial Plaque at the Royal Belfast Academical Institution

Plaque

June 20th, 1916: His daughter Suzanne was born

September 25th: He was Mentioned-in-Despatches for a first time

Early October 1917: The British launched a campaign to seize the Palestinian Territory from the Ottoman Empire that ended in the capture of Gaza (November) and Jerusalem on December 9th.

June 14th, 1918: He was Mentioned-in-Despatches for a second time by General Allenby

July 21st: He was relinquished his temporary rank of Major

August: The British launched one last effort in the Middle-East culminating with the capitulation of the Ottoman Empire on October 30th.

December 9th: He relinquished his rank of Major.

September 12th, 1920: His daughter Ida Buchanan was born on that day

August 31st, 1922: He applied for his medals

June 1924: He bought his first farm (Banyyards Hall Farm in Bunwell) at auction

July 7th, 1925: He was appointed Medical Officer to Ministry of Pensions. In 1940 he was the Assistant-Director.

August 1926: He bought his second farm at auction (Freehold Glebe Lands in Bunwell). His brother Henry was his Partner in this farming business.

July 1948: He bought his house Holly Lodge in Norfolk.

September: He sold his Banyards Hall Farm in Bunwell

February 1950: He bought at auction the Blofield House in Blofield

July 1951: He bought at auction his second house, Mametz, in Blofield, Brundall

December 23rd: His brother Henry died. He probably had to sell his farming business which he co-owned with and manage with Henry.

January 18th, 1967: His wife died at Postwick House, Postwick, Norwich, England

1970: He bought the Oak Lodge, at 122 Norwich Road, Wroxham, Norwich

Photo of Thomas George Buchanan

Thomas George Buchanan 2

June 17th, 1976: He died caused by a hemopericardium. He was living at 122 Norwich Road Wroxham, Norwich, Norfolk.

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Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Spring Walker, C.B.E., M.I.D.

Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Spring Walker served in the Royal Army Medical Corps
He was a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (Military). He was also entitled to the Queen’s South Africa Medal with the Orange Free State and Cape Colony clasps, the 1914 Star with clasp, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal .

He was born January 6th 1876 at Glanbehy, County of Kerry

April 5th, 1894: He is listed as a Midshipman on the Royal Navel Reserve List

July 29th, 1898: He received his diploma for Licentiate Midwifing from the Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland. He is listed as living at the Hurricane Lodge, Glenbeigh, and County of Kerry

April 25th, 1900: He was promoted Lieutenant in the Royal Army Medical Corps

June 18th: He sailed to South Africa (from the London Times) with the 9th General Hospital

November 14th: He embarked on the HMS Assaye. He had been invalidated. He arrived in South Hampton, United Kingdom on December 5th (from the London Times)

He served in India from 1902 to 1903

He was promoted Captain in April of 1903

He was sick from February 1904 and was back at his rank on October 19th, 1904. During that period he was probably sent back to United Kingdom.

He went back to India and served from 1905 to 1908.

March 29th, 1908: He was promoted Major and was stationed at the Magistrate Department Cantonment in India.

April 25th, 1912: He was promoted Major

September 13th, 1914: He disembarked in France with the 26th Field Ambulance (British Expeditionary Forces)

He was promoted the Assistant-Director of the 6th Division at some point during the war.

February 17th, 1915: He was Mentioned-in-Despatches for the first time.

August 3rd: He arrived on the Island of Malta from England

August 20th: He embarked on HMHS Valdivia and sailed for Mudros Harbour on the small Greek Island of Lemnos. At the time the Island of Mudros was used a rear medical base for the sick and wounded of the Gallipoli campaign. The number of casualties was so high Eastern Campaign, especially in the Dardanelles, that the British putted a lot of resources to help reduce the pressure on the medical units.

September 19th: He returned from the Island of Mudros to the Island of Malta.

January 5th, 1916: He sailed back to England.

December 26th, 1917: He was promoted Lieutenant-Colonel

May 30th 1919: He was awarded the Order of the British Empire (Commander level) for valuable service in connection with the war (London Gazette June 3rd)

July 10th: He was Mentioned-in-Despatches for a second time.

July 29th: He was Mentioned-in-Despatches for a third time. In a period of 5 months he was decorated three times for his valuable services in connection with the war. It is rare for someone to receive so many official recognitions in such a short period, although 1919 was the period to close the book for WW1 decoration.

September 9th: He applied for his 1914 Star

May 15th, 1920: He retired from the Army. He was again taken off strength for medical reasons from May 15th, 1920 until December 20th, 1920.

December 20th, 1922: he was taken off the Officer Reserve List and retired from pay

1927: He is listed as living at Woodquest, Crosshaven, County of Cork in the Medical Register. He lived there until his death in 1941.

June 24th 1941: He died Ripley Lodge Caragh Lake in Kerry County

He had one daughter named Marjorie Rose

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Death

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Doctor Helen Hanson

Dr Helen Hanson served with the Auxiliary Hospital Unit in Antwerp during WW1. She is entitled to the 1914 Star with clasp, the British War and Victory Medals, the Order of St. Sava, 2nd type from Serbia, 4th Class breast badge and a Red Cross Decoration.

She was born in 1874.

She graduated M.B. & L.S.A. in 1901 and received her M.D. from the University of London in 1904 having trained at the London School of Medicine for Women (The Royal Free Hospital).

For three years she served as Medical Officer to the Kinnaird Memorial Hospital at Lucknow, India.

In 1911 she was awarded the Diploma in Public Health of Oxford University and was appointed Assistant School Medical Officer to London County Council.

Shortly after the outbreak of war Dr Hanson went to Belgium with the St. John Unit forming the Auxiliary Hospital at Antwerp commanded by Mrs St. Clair Stobart. The unit served during the siege of Antwerp and were amongst the last civilians to leave before the city was occupied by the Germans. The unit then operated in a chateau at Cherbourg until April 1915 when it transferred to Serbia.

After serving there for 6 months, she returned to London and early in 1916 addressed the Royal Society of Arts on her experiences in Serbia as a Red Cross worker. During that time she served for 6 weeks at the Scottish Women’s Hospital Unit at Kraguijevatz.

Later Dr Hanson served with the Royal Army Medical Corps in Malta and Salonika, holding the honorary rank of Captain. Very few women served with the Royal Army Medical Corps during WW1.

Picture of her medals (sold at Dix noonan Webb in December 2012)

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After the war she served with the Black Sea Expeditionary Force at Constantinople, returning to London in 1920 to work once more for the L.C.C.

On 6 July 1926 she was killed in a motor accident. She was buried at Finchley. A Requiem Service was held for her at St. Martin-in-the-Fields on 20 July 1926.

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Private Jack Sommerton

Private Jack Sommerton served in Royal Army Medical Corps in Palestine before WW2 and in United Kingdom during WW2. He is entitled to the General Service Medal with the clasp Palestine, the 1939-1945 War Medal, the Defence Medal and the Army Good Conduct and Long Service Medal. His enlistment number was 7261759.

June 5th 1912 : He was born in Russel, United Kingdom

1933 : He enlisted in the army

May 29th, 1937 : He arrived in Palestine as part of the 3rd company Royal Army Medical Corps.

April 9th, 1939 : He left Palestine

(July-August-September) : He got married to Beatrice E Allard St Albans and in the county of Hertfordshire

1939-1945 : He served in United Kingdom during WW2

March 2nd 1951: He received his Army Good Conduct and Long Service Medal

(March-April-May) He got married a second time to Muriel Gaunt Wirral in Cheshire.

1956 : His Palestine Medal was issued and according to the medal roll, he was a sergeant by then

December 1987 : He died

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Nursing Sister and Lady Superintendent Rosamond Lucy Nevile

Lady Superintendent Rosamond Lucy Nevile served in the Queen Alexandra’s Military Nursing Service India during World War One. She is entitled to the Royal Red Cross, 2nd Class, the 1914 Star, the British War Medal, the Victory Medal and the India General Service Medal 1908 clasp Waziristan 1919-21.

Rosamond Lucy Nevile was born on 1 June 1877 in native of Hammersmith, London.

In 1881 she is listed as residing in Salford, Lancashire.

In 1891 she is listed residing in Fairfield, Derbyshire.

In 1901 she is listed as residing in Fisherton Anger, Salisbury, Wiltshire and as being employed at Salisbury Infirmary.

September 2nd 1907: She joined the Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service as a Staff Nurse. Prior to joining the Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service she had been employed as a Nurse in England.

November 24th, 1911: She had been appointed Nursing Sister with the Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service for India (London Gazette)

The Indian Army Lists show that Nursing Sister Rosamond started her service with the Queen Alexandra’s Military Nursing Service India on 29 November 1911.

In 1912 she is listed as residing in Calcutta, India

As a Nursing Sister with the Queen Alexandra’s Military Nursing Service India she entered the France theatre of war on 7 November 1914 (Medal Index Card refers). She was attached to the Rawal Pindi British General Hospital. All 17 Nurses of the Q.A.M.M.S.I. that had served in France were withdrawn had been by latest March 1916.

1916: She was stationed in Poona, India

12 September 1919: She received the Royal Red Cross 2nd class.

1921: She was stationed in Sialkot, India

1933: She was stationed in Dalhousie, India

She was appointed a Senior Nursing Sister in November 1924 and Lady Superintendent in August 1930.

She continued to serve in India through to at least 1933.

Last quarter of 1972 : She died at Taunton, Somerset, England.

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Her medals were sold at Dix and Noonan in October of 2012

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Lieutenant Julian Garth Harley

Lieutenant Julian Garth Harley served with the Royal Army Medical Corps in Borneo and Northen Ireland. He is entitled to the General Service Medal clasps Borneo and Northern Ireland. He is also entitled to the Good Conduct and Long Service Medal EII (Bar Regular Army). His service number was 23948593.

Enlisted early 1960’s

He served in North Borneo, Sarawak or Brunei between 24 December 1962 and 11 August 1966. This conflict claimed the lives of 114 Commonwealth personnel killed, 180 wounded.

He was a drill instructor at R.A.M.C. depot in late 70’s and later became the Chief Drill Instructor there.

He must have served for at least  30 days’ in Northen Ireland after 14 August 1969.

March 6th 1990 : Promoted from Warrant Officer class I to Lieutenant on March 6th, 1990 with the Territorial Army (R.A.M.C.). probably after retiring from the Regular Force

March 6th,1991 : Probation confirmed

May 26th, 1993: To be a Lieutenant with Territorial Army group A

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Lieutenant-Colonel Charles Henry Carr

Lieutenant- Colonel Charles Henry Carr served in the Royal Army Medical Corps during World War One and in what was then India in 1919. He is entitled to the 1914 Star, the British War medal, The Victory Medal and the India General Service Medal clasp North-West Frontier 1919.

He was born on 20th September 1873 inYoughal, County Cork

March 21st, 1898: He registered for the first time as a surgeon. He graduated from the University of Dublin

May 30th, 1900: He was promoted Lieutenant

1901-1902: He served in West Africa

May 30th 1903: Promoted Captain

1903-1908: He served in India

1911 United Kingdom Census: Married to Edith France Carr and they had no children. He was living in Handover, Hampshire.

May 30th 1912: Promoted Major and he was stationed at the Commanding Station Hospital in Jullunder, India.

1914: His son, Charles B. Argaville DeVoeux, was born that year. He was married with Edith Frances Carr.

August 17th 1914: He disembarked in France.

August 9th 1915: He arrived from England.

1916 : At St David’s Military Hospital Malta.

May 2nd 1917 Mobilised St David’s Military Hospital as No 62 General Hospital, and brought its strength to war time establishment.

July 4th: He embarked for Salonika in command of No 62 General Hospital on the HMTS Ship Abbassieh which sailed out of the Grand Harbour escorted by HMS Aster and HMS Azalea. Both escorts struck mines eleven miles out of Malta, and HMTS Abbassieh returned to Malta and anchored at Marsaxlokk Harbour.

July 6th: HMT Ship Abbassieh with Nos 61, 62, and 64 General Hospitals sailed out of Marsaxlokk Harbour escorted by two destroyers. The staff was given their first inoculation against cholera.

July 11th: Appointed Acting Lieutenant-Colonel. HMTS Abbassieh arrived at Suda Bay Crete on 9 July, where all the staff were issued with quinine grs X, as prophylaxis against malaria. They arrived at Salonika Harbour, on 11 July 1917. All the women and doctors were transferred to the hospital ship Llandovery Castle.

January 1918: He was serving as Officer Commanding the 62nd General Hospital in Italy when he applied for the 1914 Star in January 1918

April 7th: Promoted Lieutenant-Colonel

January 1920: He was at the Nowshera British Station Hospital in Peshawar, India

September 20th 1928: He was put on Retired Pay

1943 May 31st: His son, Charles B. Argaville DeVoeux, was killed in an accident while serving with to the York and Lancaster Regiment but attached to the 6th Bn The Queen’s Own Royal West Kent Regiment

He died 25th December 1961 in Worthing, Sussex

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