Category Archives: surname D

Private Josaphat Delisle

Private Josaphat Delisle served with the 3rd Pioneer Battalion with the Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War One. He is entitled to the British War Medal and Victory Medal.

British War medal and Victory Medal

Bourne-M

He was born on April 3, 1891 in Valleyfield, Quebec.

He signed his Attestation Paper with the 57th Regiment, Canadian Engineers on September 27, 1915 in Montreal, Quebec, at the age of 24, naming his next-of-kin as his wife, Sarah Belduc (probably Bolduc) Delisle of Longueuil, Quebec.

He stated that he had no previous military service, that he was married.

His trade was that of Auto Mechanic. Three days later, he was transferred to the 41st Battalion “Canadiens Francais” on September 30th. The Battalion sailed October 18th aboard the S.S. Saxonia, arriving in England on October 28, 1915.

Three weeks later, he was sentenced to Field Punishment No. 1 for being absent without leave at parade at Bramshott, forfeiting one days’ pay, on November 12th.

He was transferred to the 3rd Canadian Pioneer Battalion on February 19, 1916, landing in France three weeks later, on March 9th. He was nine days in the French theatre, on March 18th, when he suffered a gunshot (shrapnel) wound to his right elbow at Ypres. He was admitted to No. 1 Canadian Field Ambulance, and then transferred to No. 1 Casualty Clearing Station the same day. The following day, he was transferred to No. 2 Canadian Stationary Hospital, where the “Shrapnel (was) removed.

He did endure a fever from the 20th to the 26th, spiking on the 22nd at almost 104 F but eventually it subsided. On March 27th, he was invalided to England aboard the Hospital Ship Cambria, where he was transferred to King George’s Hospital, Stamford St., London on the 28th, taken on strength at the Canadian Casualty Assembly Centre at Folkestone on April 4th.

After five weeks at King George’s Hospital, he was transferred to the Grand Duchess George of Russia Hospital at Harrogate on May 3, 1916, where he was to spend the next five months, before being transferred again, this time to the 2nd Northern General Hospital at Leeds on October 15th, for an additional month’s hospitalization. He was subsequently transferred to the Canadian Convalescent Hospital, Woodcote Park at Epsom on November 16, 1916. In his Medical Report of an Invalid, dated December 9, 1916 at Epsom, it confirmed that he was injured at Ypres on “17.3.16 (when) shrapnel struck him on right elbow, shattering the joint, that he was “wounded on active service in the presence of the enemy”. It was recommended that he be invalided to Canada, his general health declared to be “good”. Although his early operation consisted of “washing out (of the) wound & removal of (the) shrapnel”, his disability was determined to be “permanent”, that the extent of his capacity for earning a full livelihood in the general labour market lessened at present to “1/2 permanently. Evidence in (his) papers of infection in (the) wound, forearm fixed in position, midway between pronation and supination. Elbow solidly fixed at right angles. Right arm involved.” He was discharged December 19th and placed on command to the Canadian Convalescent Depot at Hastings on December 22nd. He ceased to be attached to the CCD and was struck off strength at Buxton for Canada, on January 13, 1917.

Three days later, he embarked Liverpool aboard the S.S. Northland on January 16th. In his Proceedings of a Medical Board at Discharge Depot Report, dated January 26, 1917 at Quebec City, Quebec, it was noted that his elbow was fixed at a 90 degree angle, that his degree of incapacity was as 30% and that the condition was permanent. It rendered him permanently unfit for military service, and that an “operation, special treatment or the use of appliances, etc., to lessen incapacity” was approved.

He was discharged from the Army on March 2nd and his pension was granted the following day. Almost nine months went by and Delisle re-attested with the 3rd Canadian Pioneer Battalion, signing his second Attestation Paper on November 30, 1917 at Montreal, naming his wife, Sarah, as his next-of-kin, stating that he had previous military service with the 41st Battalion CEF, that he was married and that his trade was that of Mechanic.

He also stated that he had previously been discharged as “Medically Unfit” due to a shrapnel wound to his right elbow. Three weeks later, while at Military District No. 4 Depot in Montreal, he was admitted to Grey Nuns Convalescent Home at Montreal on December 18th. It noted that about November 26th, that Delisle had “noticed pain and swelling below (the) elbow.”

In his Medical History of an Invalid, dated January 4, 1918 at Montreal, it stated that he had three visible scars, the third of which was at the “site of (the) incision for draining of an abscess, developed about three weeks ago. It was recommended that he be declared Category “E” (unfit for service )

He was discharged from Grey Nuns Convalescent Home on January 12, 1918 and put on outpatient status. Ten days later, he was discharged from the Army again, on January 22, 1918 at Montreal.

As he was declared Class 3, his pension was granted on March 3, 1917.

served with the 3rd Pioneer Battalion with the Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War One. He is entitled to the British War Medal and Victory Medal.

He was born on April 3, 1891 in Valleyfield, Quebec.

He signed his Attestation Paper with the 57th Regiment, Canadian Engineers on September 27, 1915 in Montreal, Quebec, at the age of 24, naming his next-of-kin as his wife, Sarah Belduc (probably Bolduc) Delisle of Longueuil, Quebec.

He stated that he had no previous military service, that he was married.

His trade was that of Auto Mechanic. Three days later, he was transferred to the 41st Battalion “Canadiens Francais” on September 30th. The Battalion sailed October 18th aboard the S.S. Saxonia, arriving in England on October 28, 1915.

Three weeks later, he was sentenced to Field Punishment No. 1 for being absent without leave at parade at Bramshott, forfeiting one days’ pay, on November 12th.

He was transferred to the 3rd Canadian Pioneer Battalion on February 19, 1916, landing in France three weeks later, on March 9th. He was nine days in the French theatre, on March 18th, when he suffered a gunshot (shrapnel) wound to his right elbow at Ypres. He was admitted to No. 1 Canadian Field Ambulance, and then transferred to No. 1 Casualty Clearing Station the same day. The following day, he was transferred to No. 2 Canadian Stationary Hospital, where the “Shrapnel (was) removed.

He did endure a fever from the 20th to the 26th, spiking on the 22nd at almost 104 F but eventually it subsided. On March 27th, he was invalided to England aboard the Hospital Ship Cambria, where he was transferred to King George’s Hospital, Stamford St., London on the 28th, taken on strength at the Canadian Casualty Assembly Centre at Folkestone on April 4th.

After five weeks at King George’s Hospital, he was transferred to the Grand Duchess George of Russia Hospital at Harrogate on May 3, 1916, where he was to spend the next five months, before being transferred again, this time to the 2nd Northern General Hospital at Leeds on October 15th, for an additional month’s hospitalization. He was subsequently transferred to the Canadian Convalescent Hospital, Woodcote Park at Epsom on November 16, 1916. In his Medical Report of an Invalid, dated December 9, 1916 at Epsom, it confirmed that he was injured at Ypres on “17.3.16 (when) shrapnel struck him on right elbow, shattering the joint, that he was “wounded on active service in the presence of the enemy”. It was recommended that he be invalided to Canada, his general health declared to be “good”. Although his early operation consisted of “washing out (of the) wound & removal of (the) shrapnel”, his disability was determined to be “permanent”, that the extent of his capacity for earning a full livelihood in the general labour market lessened at present to “1/2 permanently. Evidence in (his) papers of infection in (the) wound, forearm fixed in position, midway between pronation and supination. Elbow solidly fixed at right angles. Right arm involved.” He was discharged December 19th and placed on command to the Canadian Convalescent Depot at Hastings on December 22nd. He ceased to be attached to the CCD and was struck off strength at Buxton for Canada, on January 13, 1917.

Three days later, he embarked Liverpool aboard the S.S. Northland on January 16th. In his Proceedings of a Medical Board at Discharge Depot Report, dated January 26, 1917 at Quebec City, Quebec, it was noted that his elbow was fixed at a 90 degree angle, that his degree of incapacity was as 30% and that the condition was permanent. It rendered him permanently unfit for military service, and that an “operation, special treatment or the use of appliances, etc., to lessen incapacity” was approved.

He was discharged from the Army on March 2nd and his pension was granted the following day. Almost nine months went by and Delisle re-attested with the 3rd Canadian Pioneer Battalion, signing his second Attestation Paper on November 30, 1917 at Montreal, naming his wife, Sarah, as his next-of-kin, stating that he had previous military service with the 41st Battalion CEF, that he was married and that his trade was that of Mechanic.

He also stated that he had previously been discharged as “Medically Unfit” due to a shrapnel wound to his right elbow. Three weeks later, while at Military District No. 4 Depot in Montreal, he was admitted to Grey Nuns Convalescent Home at Montreal on December 18th. It noted that about November 26th, that Delisle had “noticed pain and swelling below (the) elbow.”

In his Medical History of an Invalid, dated January 4, 1918 at Montreal, it stated that he had three visible scars, the third of which was at the “site of (the) incision for draining of an abscess, developed about three weeks ago. It was recommended that he be declared Category “E” (unfit for service )

He was discharged from Grey Nuns Convalescent Home on January 12, 1918 and put on outpatient status. Ten days later, he was discharged from the Army again, on January 22, 1918 at Montreal.

He was declared Class 3, his pension was granted on March 3, 1917.

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Corporal Ernest Dickerson

Corporal Ernest Dickerson served in the 13th battalion (Montreal Blackwatch)  Canadian Expeditionary Forces during WW1. He is entitled to the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. His enlistment number was 24349.

Born on March 19th, 1892 in North Hampton England

Trade : painter       Weight : 157 lbs.   Religion : Church of England     

Height : 5’6″           Eyes : grey                  Hair: fair

August 25th, 1914 : Arrived in Valcartier, Quebec. They left Montreal the night before

He served 6 years in the Northampton regiment prior to his enlistment.

Name of his father : Charles Dickerson    

Address : 48 East street, Northampton, England

Name of his wife : Constance Mary Dickerson

Address : 361 Wilson street Sault Ste Marie

September 23rd : Enlisted in the 13th battalion “C” company in Valcartier, Quebec. Embarked on the Alaunia on September 25th and they waited for 4 days before leaving on September 30th. Arrived in Gaspe Basin on October 2nd and departed on October 4th. Arrived in Plymouth, England on October 15th and disembarked around 10:00 pm. Arrived on Salisbury Plain on the 16th.

February 11th, 1915 : Embarked for France on ship Novian in Avonmouth, England. Arrived in St-Nazaire, France on February 15th. But they couldn’t disembarked until the afternoon of the next day, the 16th. They took the train and reached Hazebrouck late February 19th.

March 6th : The battalion was put in the front line for the first time. They were relieved on March 9th.

March 20th : Drunk and absent for duty (sentenced to 1 hour of extra drill for a week)

April 22nd : The Second battle of Yores started at 3 pm. The Germans launched a massive artillery bombardment on the Canadian line followed by a gas attack. The Turcos regiment on their left were overwhelmed and left their position, the 13th was attacked by the rear. The shelling continued the next morning and twice they were push back from their position and twice they regained it with a counter-attack but only to be welcomed by an intense German artillery barrage. They were gassed again on the 24th and finally relieved by the British on the 25th.

May 24th: Hospitalized at the 3rd Canadian Field Ambulance (hemorrhoids). Returned to his unit May 29th.

July 27th: Promoted to corporal

December 3rd to 12th: On leave to England

April 15th, 1916 Gun shot wound at his left foot at Ypres whilst taking platoon into new part of the trenches. He was also gazed. Transferred to England on the ship St-George after that he was he was admitted at the 2nd Canadian Stationary Hospital on the 22nd. Foot completely healed on May 8th.

June 2nd: At around 8 am the Germans launched an artillery barrage on the Canadian position. At 1:45 pm, the Germans launched their foot attack on the trench. The 13th, which was in reserve was called for reinforcement urgently and reached the front late that day. Their counter-attack was planned for June 3rd, 8 am But they were not able to reach their objective

June 13th: At 1:30 am The battalion launched an attack to regain their original position that they were occupying at the start of the month.

He then went to United, Kingdom and his war in France was over.

June 20th: Admitted to hospital in Shorncliffe (chancroid). Discharged July 4th.

September 30th, Admitted to hospital  in Shorncliffe (syphilis) Discharged on October 18th, 1916.

January 4th, 1917 : Transferred to the 5th Reserve battalion in Sandling.

October 18th : Returned to Canada on SS Grampian

November 16th, 1918 : Appointed to Company Sergeant major

November 30th, 1919 : Discharged

September 24th, 1964 : Died in Saint-Thomas, Ontario and buried at Elmdale memorial cemetery Section A, row 358 grave A

WW1 1915 trio (1914-15 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal)

WW1 trio

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Private René Dusseault or René Lapensée

Private René Dusseault served in the 58 th battalion Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War One. He enlisted a second time under an alias of René Lapensée. He is entitled to the British War medal and the Victory Medal. His service numbers were 634070 (Dusseault) and 144200 (Lapensée).

War Service Badge Class “A” 230345 : not with the group

Born on May 14th 1896 in Hull, Quebec          Trade : Labourer and Lumberjack

Religion : Roman catholic       Status : single           Height : 5′ 3″

Eyes : brown           Hair : black              Weight : 130 lbs

Name of his father : Wilfred Dusseault                   Address : 14 Melrose Avenue, Ottawa

August 2nd, 1915 : Enlisted in the 77th battalion in Ottawa under the name René Lapensée.

October 23rd : Sailed on the SS California from Quebec. Arrived in England on November 2nd, 1915.

February 23rd, 1916 : He was declared medically unfit (urinal incontinence) for military service and was sent back to Canada. The report stated that he was suffering this problem before enlisting.

April 18th : Enlisted in Cornwall in the 154th battalion (Stormont Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders) under the name René Dusseault. He stated that he had 4 months of previous military service with the 73rd Regiment (Hull).

October 25th : Sailed from Halifax on board HMT Mauretamia (with John Angus Gillies), arrived in Liverpool, England on October 31st. They walked to Bramshott Camp under the rain and arrived late at night.

January 5th, 1917: Transferred to the 58th battalion.

April 12th : Reported Missing in action. He was discovered and accused

Accusation «When on active service deserting his majestys Services in that on the 12th April 1917 absented himself from his company in the La Folie Wood trenches until apprehended by an escort in a Y.M.C.A. Hut Ecoivres. Sentenced to 10 years penal servitude. Sentence confirmed by Lt. Col H. A. Genet 9th Cdn Inf Bgde who commutes the sentence to 5 years penal servitude»

October 6th : He was accused in a second trial for «when on active service absented himself without leave from 10:00 am August 21st, 1917 to August 27th 1917». Imprisoned and waiting for his trial from August 27th, 1917 to October 18th, 1917 when he was put on trial. He was sentenced to 56 days forfeit pays. He was imprisoned from August 27th to October 18th.

For a full transcript of his trials click here Trial transcript

October 11th : Hospitalized at the 12th Canadian Field Ambulance for Albuminuria.

November 14th : Transferred to the 12th Canadian Casualty Clearing Station.

November 17th : Transferred to the  4th General Hospital in Camiers on for the same illness.

February 10th, 1919 : Sent to England.

March 17th : Embarked on the SS Olympic in South Hampton, England.

March 28th : Demobilized.

Died on June 10 th 1941.

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Nursing Sister Gertrude Petty Donaldson

Nursing Sister Gertrude Petty Donaldson served in the Canadian Army Medical Corps. She is entitled to the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

Born on August 14th, 1892 in Sarnia, Ontario

Height: 5′ 4″     Weight: 125 lbs.           Religion: Church of England

Enlisted on February 2nd, 1916 in Toronto.

Embarked on November 17th, 1917

Posted with the Ontario Military Hospital.

Posted with the 1st Canadian General Hospital on November 5th, 1917.

Posted the 16th Canadian General Hospital on November 14th.

Permitted to resign on December 15th, 1917 probably to get married. Nursing Sister were not allowed to be married and serving with the army at the same time. Although in some cases Nursing Sisters served with the Canadian Army in non-combat zone (Canada and United Kingdom) and were married but they were the exceptions.

Her father was G.C. Petty Hensall of Ontario

Demobilized on July 13th 1919 (papers were signs in Ottawa at this date).

Died on July 29th, 1919 at the age of 26. She is buried in Union Cemetery in Hensall, Ontario

Her medals, Memorial Plaque and Scroll and Memorial Cross were sent to her husband  John Milton Donaldson who was living at 259 6th Street Brandon, Manitoba.

At the time the Memorial Cross was given only to the “wife” of the deceased contrary to today’s rule that state that the Cross is given to the “spouse” of the deceased. Yes the choice of word is important here. Technically her husband should have not received the Memorial Cross but I guess that the person in charge of issuing the Cross at the Canadian Government found the rule discriminatory and issued a Cross to her husband. Matron Jessie Brown Jaggard (her story can be found by clicking here) was the only other Canadian whose husband also received the Memorial Cross.

But the rule was not applied equally; Nursing Sister Jean Olgivie Alport also died during her WW1 but her husband did not receive her Memorial Cross. I think the strict rule was applied in her case and they were more “opened” in the case of Nursing Sister Donaldson and Jaggard.

Her Memorial Cross were sent to her mother.

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Picture of Nursing Sister Donaldson gravestone

Private Arthur William Dalby

Private Arthur William Dalby served with the Sherwood Forester in United Kingdom before WW1 and in  the Canadian Expeditionnary Forces with the 60th battalion (Victoria Rifles) during WW1. He is entitled to the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. His enlistment number was 457258.

Born on December 1st, 1886 in Derby, England

1891 United Kingdom census taken at 90 St-Thomas road, Litchurch, Derby

Father : Matthew born in 1858 (tool hardener)       Mother : Louisa born in 1859

Brother : John born in 1884       Sister : Mary G. born in 1890

1901 March 31th : He was living with his parent at 18 Hall street in Alvaston, Derbyshire

1909 June 21st : Enlisted in the 3rd battalion Sherwood Forester (3109) in United Kingdom

His trade was motor mechanic

October 20th : Overstayed his pass from 12:00 am to 8:50 am

1910, September 28th : Called out for his annual training. Listed as a lance corporal

1911, May 8th : Called out for his annual training. Listed as a corporal

1912, July 12th  : Called out for his annual training. Listed as sergeant

1913, June 30th : Called out for his annual training

World War One – C.E.F.

1915 June 21st : Enlisted in the 60th battalion on in Montreal. His civilian job was with Bell Canada. He was a signaller in the Canadian Expeditionary Forces.

Trade : electrician    Religion : Church of England   Status : married

Height : 5’6″    Eyes : grey          Hair : dark brown    Weight : 109 lbs

Wife : Elizabeth Dalby     Address : 624 Workman street, Saint-Henri, Montreal

June 30th : Entrained for Valcartier. October 25th : Entrained from Valcartier to Montreal where they went into quarters Northen Electric Barracks on Guy street.

November 6th : Sailed from Montreal on the ship Scandinavian. Arrived in Bramshott November 16th.

1916 February 20th : Embarked for overseas and arrived in France on the 22nd.

April 18th : A shell exploded near him throwing him in a crater while the unit was under heavy bombardments at dusk in the Camp D sector.

August 14th, heavy bombardment begin at around 2:30 pm, a shell exploded near him throwing again in a hole. Excerpt from the daily logbook of the 60th battalion : Quiet morning. About 2:30 pm enemy started shelling our front and support lines with heavy and medium sized trench mortars, causing a number of casualties, one Stokes gun and crew completely wiped out. Owing to a relief of the Divisional artillery and some misunderstanding between the groups, the batteries covering our front were not registered and it took over one hour and a half to obtain retaliation.

September 9th : Admitted to the Canadian Convalescent Hospital in Epsom. He was suffering from extreme anxiety. Excerpt from a medical report dated September 25th «Rifle fell through the roof 30 feet above and hit patient on the head. Shell shock on two occasions and a blow of rifle affected him. For that he now has attack of distress about heart weakness and dizziness, lack of energy.»

October 11th : Discharged and returned to Canada on board the ship Olympic. He had two children, Edith Lilian (7 years) and George Arthur (2 years). Listed in Lovell’s Montreal directory as an electrician and living at 118 Minto from 1917 until 1928

late 1917 : Extract from a medical report dated January 19th «Complains of pains in left shoulder and occasionally in right. Had rheumatism at enlistment. Also complains of pain over precordium. No murmurs heard over heart area. Says he only sleep about 3 hours in night. Has a course tremor of hands.»

1949 : September : Went to Chicago, USA.

Copy of his passenger card from that trip

Listed in Lovell’s directory as a switchboard installer for Bell Telephone Canada and living at 5764 18th avenue, Rosemont, Quebec from 1946 to 1949

At the same time, one of his fellow comrade from the 60th battalion, Leslie Tucker, (click here to see his story) was also working for the Bell Telephone Canada company and living in the same city sector as him. I wonder if they still met on a regular base after the war.

1971 August 27th : Died (probably in Los Angeles)

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WW1 medals pair

Nursing Sister Françoise Donald

Nursing sister Francoise Donald served with the Army Nursing Service Reserve during the Boers’ War.

On enlistment she gave her address as 23rd Queen Mary avenue, Kelvinside, Glasgow

On August 26th 1901 she reported with the 14th General Hospital Newcastle Royal Army Medical Corps

She is entitled to the Queen South Africa Medal and King South Africa Medal (both without clasp)

After the Boers’ war she worked as a nurse and mid-wife in South Africa

Francoise Donald (1903) in her Boers’ War uniform and wearing her medals

Francoise Donald (1935) wearing her Boers’ War medals

Nursing Sister Lena Aloa Davis

Nursing Sister Davis served with the Canadian Army Medical Corps during WW1. She is one of the few women who died while serving her country at war in the Canadian army. She is entitled to the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. Her mother received the Memorial Plaque, the Memorial Scroll and the Memorial Cross.

Born on July 30th 1885 in Beamsville, Ontario.
Height : 5′ 6″                       Weight : 170 lbs.
Religion : Baptist
Enlisted April 7th, 1915 in Toronto, Ontario.
Posted with the 4th Canadian Stationary Hospital in Salonika on October 10th, 1915.
On September 15th, 1916, she disembarked from the Llandovery Castle, hospital ship.
On August 19th she contracted malaria, she stayed four weeks in bed and had high fever, her body temperature reached 105 oF at one point.
On September 17th the situation came back to normal, she was given 4 weeks rest
On October 10th she was not perfectly well, she got another three weeks rest.
On March 27th, she had no more signs of infection.
On April 17th, 1917 she was admitted to Moore Barrack’s hospital in Shorncliffe after being in contact with Nursing sister Fraser who had diphtheria.
Hospitalised at the 4th Canadian General Hospital in Basingstoke on February 17th, 1918. She was seriously ill, she had Blackwater fever.
On February 20th she was dangerously ill.
Died on February 21st, 1918 at 1h35 a.m. at the age of 34.
Medals (1914-15 Star, British War medal, Victory medal) were sent to her sister, Emma Davis 544
Clinton Street (Toronto)
Memorial Plaque and Scroll and Memorial Cross were sent to her mother, Martha J. Davis.

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Buried at SHERBORNE ST. JOHN (ST. ANDREW) CHURCHYARD, UNITED KINGDOM

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Nursing Sister Annie Clarke Crerar De Wolfe

Nursing Sister Annie Clarke Crerar De Wolfe served with the Canadian Army Medical Corps during WW1. She is entitled to the British War medal only as she served only in United Kingdom.

Born on June 21st, 1893 in Halifax, Nova Scotia
Trade: nurse                          Religion: Presbyterian
Status: Single                         Height: 5′ 11″
Weight: 145 lbs.
Name of her father: Fred De Wolfe                  Address: 3rd Cherry street Halifax

February 15th, 1918: She signed her enlistment paper in Montreal, Canada

March 10th : Posted with the 14th Canadian General Hospital. Arrived with the unit on the 17th

November 5th : Granted 14 days leave

December 17th : Struck of strength of the unit and sent to the 9th Canadian General Hospital

February 26th, 1919 : Admitted 9th Canadian General Hospital. Discharged on March 5th.

July 4th : Struck of strength of the 16th Canadian general Hospital

July 7th : Taken on strength with the 9th Canadian General Hospital

July 28th : Embarked on R.M.S. Adriatic. Arrived in Halifax on August 5th.

August 13th : Demobilized

September 25th, 1928 : Medals despatched to her at 4409 8th avenue Vancouver, British Columbia
Extra information taken from http://www.rootsweb.com/~nspictou/elect_text/crerar2.htm

Capt. William Grant Crerar who was born12 August, 1821 in Pictou and died on 2 April 1898 in Glenalmond, Pictou. He was married to Mary Fennell who was born in1819 and died on 26 May 1856

William died at Glenalmond on 2 April 1898, at the age of 67, and was buried in the Laurel Hill Cemetery [Pictou Advocate, 8 April 1898, p.7: obituary]. In his will he was generous to his relatives, exonerating John Crerar of Chicago of his debt incurred, and giving copious amounts of money to family members, especially to his niece Annie Clarke (Crerar) DeWolfe.

Annie Clarke Crerar born 21 March 1868, Nova Scotia – died 25 June 1892 Halifax married Fred T. De Wolfe. Annie had a short and sad life. On 17 September 1891, she married Fred T. De Wolfe, “In the St.Andrew’s Church (Kirk) in Pictou, on the 17 inst. by Rev. R. Atkinson, assisted by Rev. W.Calder, uncle of the groom,” [The Enterprise, 19 Sept. 1891]. In 1894 Fred was a coach salesman for De Wolfe, Son & Co., N.W. Common, Halifax. In 1892, they had their only child, “Nan” Ann Clark Crerar DeWolfe, who died at a young age of a medicinal overdose. Ann herself would perish in childbirth, in Halifax in 1898. She was buried in the Haliburton Cemetery Crerar plot under a small headstone marked “Annie 1892”. Her grave inscription reads “We shall meet over the river.” Her widower husband would later marry again, and is buried elsewhere (probably Mountain view cemetery in New Westminster, British Columbia). In 1921 Fred lived at 3543-8th West Avenue, Vancouver, and was the informant for J.E. Carson’s death. He probably died on May 21th, 1948 in New Westminster, British Columbia

A 1923 letter from J.P. Crerar to Olivia DeWolfe makes clear that Nan was alive and married at that time. “Nan” Ann Clark Crerar DeWolfe (born 1892 – died after 1923)

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Nursing Sister Margaret C. Delaney

Although Margaret C Delaney did not serve with the Canadian Army Medical Corps, she was one of the very Canadian women who went to Europe during WW1 as a trained nurse. She worked for the St-John Ambulance and served under the British Red Cross like all other St-John Ambulance personnel. She is entitled to the British War Medal and the Service Medal of the Order of St-John with two clasps. After the war she continued serving with the St-John Ambulance in Canada

Born in on August 1th, 1893 in Nova, Scotia

Information from the 1901 census taken in Ward No. 3, Winnipeg, Manitoba
Father : William Delaney born July 28th 1863
Mother : Mary Delaney born February 7th 1861
Brother : William Delaney born March 14th 1888
Brother : Patrick Delaney born July 11th 1891
Sister : Agnes Delaney born June 18th 1897
Sister : Frances Delaney born July 24th 1900

March 1915 : Joined the Order of St-John as a nursing sister with the Canadian Pacific Railway nursing division
February 1918 : On active service
March 25th : Enlisted as a paid nurse with the British Red Cross from the C.P.R.N. Division no 8
November 5th  : Posted to the War Hospital in Reading

May 6th, 1919 : Demobilised with the British Red Cross.  She gave Agnes street, Winnipeg as her address
November 18th, 1919 : Left the St-John Ambulance Brigade

Not with the brigade from 1920 to 1924

1924 : Rejoined with the Fort Garry nursing division
December 3rd, 1928 : Became the Secretary treasurer of the division
December 31st, 1935 : Received the Service Medal of the Order of St-John (St-John Ambulance Long Service Medal)
October 1st, 1936 : Appointed Lady Division Superintendent
December 29th, 1937 : Transferred to the Canadian Pacific Railway nursing division
September 1st, 1940 : Appointed Lady District officer – Manitoba
June 18th, 1941 : Awarded her first bar medal (17 years of service)
November 13th, 1945 : Awarded her second bar (22 years of service)
March 1st, 1949 : On the reserve list

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