Category Archives: surname E

Corporal John Easton

Corporal John Easton served in the 2nd battalion Scots Guards during the 1885 Egypt Campaign. He is entitled to theEgypt Medal clasp Suakin 1885

he was born October of 1849 in Glasgow, Scotland

Religion : Presbyterian          Trade : blacksmith     Height : 5′ 11″

Eyes : grey                   Hair: dark brown        Weight : 138 lbs

November 20th, 1869: He enlisted in the Scots Fusiliers Guards in Glasgow, Scotland.

Between March 17th, 1871 and August 11th 1874 he was imprisoned 11 times for the same motive; absence without a leave

September 30th, 1873: Hospitalized in Dublin for syphilis and again on September 1st, 1876 for the same disease but this time in London.

September 28th, 1879: Married to Alice Mattews

October 9th: Re-engaged to complete his 21 years

July 28th, 1882: Appointed Lance-Corporal and back to the rank of Private on January 24th, 1883.

July 6th: Hospitalized in Windsor for ulcer

July 27th, 1884: He was appointed Lance-Corporal a second time and he was appointed Corporal on July 25th.

February 21st, 1885: The battalion paraded at Wellington Barracks before embarking for Egypt

Suakin 3

March 9th: Posted to an outpost position near Suakin (nightly harassment)

May 8th: The battalion received their Khaki clothing (first time in the regiment)

May 16th: The battalion embarked for Alexandria

July 8th: They eft Egypt for Cyprus where they arrived on July 11th and were back home on September 11th

November 20th, 1888: Promoted to Lance-Sergeant

May 1st, 1889: He was promoted Sergeant

October 12th, 1891: He was permitted to continue in service beyond 21 years

He was discharged on June 22nd, 1892. He had served for 22 years and 215 days

September 22nd, 1927: He was still claiming a pension and it was revised for the last time on that day.

If you know additional information on this gentleman, please leave me a comment so I can add the information to his small biography.

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Lance Corporal Edward Thomas Etherington

Lance Corporal  Edward Thomas Etherington served in the Canadian Army Medical Corps during WW1. He is entitled to the British War Medal and Victory Medal. The number of his War Service badge class “A” is 202944

Born on April 13th 1895 in London, England

Religion : Roman Catholic     Status : single       Height : 5′ 6″

Eyes : blue        Hair : blond          Weight : 130 lbs

Mother : Mary Etherington             Father : John Etherington

Address : 37 Elmwood avenue, London, Ontario

December 20th, 1915 : Enlisted in the 2nd Field Ambulance Depot in London, Ontario.

Sailed on the SS Empress of Britannia, arrived in England April 10th, 1916.

Posted to the Granville Special Hospital in Ramsgate from May 10th 1916 to June 27th 1917.

June 27th, 1917 : Promoted to the rank of Lance corporal.

September 28th : Posted at the Canadian Army Medical Corps Depot.

November 1st : Returned to the rank of Private and posted to the Granville Canadian Stationary Hospital. November 2nd : Disembarked in Havre, France.

November 11th : Posted with the 5th Canadian Field Ambulance and transferred to C company of that unit (from Daily Orders notebook 5th C.F.A.)

March 15th, 1918 : Sentenced to four days of forfeit pays because he was absent of the morning roll call at 6h45 am.

November 24th : The u/m (under mentionned) on proceeding on leave of absence to United Kingdom sailing at dates opposite to their name are struck of strenght of this unit 528549 Pte Etherington 22-11-18 (from Daily Orders notebook 5th C.F.A.)

December 24th : Returned from leave (from Daily Orders notebook 5th C.F.A.). His unit was already in Germany

April 7th, 1919 : Returned to England. Arrived in South Hampton on the 8th at 8:00

May 10th : Left Witley Camp. Entrained for South Hampton and boarded the SS Olympic early afternoon. Left at 20:00.  Arrived in Halifax on May 16th.

May 19th : Arrived in Toronto and demobilised. He served for a period of 3 years and 110 days with the 5th Canadian Field Ambulance.

Address after demobilisation : R R no 4 Saint-Esmonds, London South Ontario

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography

Edward Thomas Etherington WW1 medals

Nursing Sister Muriel Shirecliffe Parker Ellis A.R.R.C.

Nursing Sister Muriel Shirecliffe Parker Ellis A.R.R.C. served with the Canadian Army medicla Corps during WW1. She is entitled to the Royal Red Cross 2nd class, the 1914-15 Star, the British War medal and the Victory Medal.

Born on October 27th, 1878 in London, England (on her enlistment paper she lied about her age)
Religion : Church of England           Status : Single     Height : 5′ 7″

Weight : 125 lbs.                       Eyes : dark grey         Hair : fair brown

Name of her father : W B Ellis Address : 342 Carden Drive, Vancouver British Columbia

1881 United Kingdom census taken in 32 Acacia road, Marylebone, London, England
She was born in 1878 according to the information on the census
Father Walter B. (organ builder) born in 1854
Mother : Maria S born in 1854     Sister : Priscillia born in 1880
one house maid (Harriet Christopher) and one cook (Kate Allaway)

1901 United Kingdom census taken in Wargrave St Mary, Berkshire, England
She was born in 1878 according to the information on the census
Father Walter B. (company agent) born in 1854
Mother : Maria S born in 1856       Sister : Priscillia born in 1879
The family had one nurse (Alice Wilson) and one cook (Mary Pollinghome)

1911 Canadian census Family living in Vancouver city, British Columbia

February 8th, 1915 : Sailed from Canada on (MO 267).

May 12th : She signed her enlistment paper in London, England (Kingslay Hotel 34 Victoria Street) but she enlisted earlier in Canada. Enlisted the same day as M. C. English but not sworn in by the same matron. She signed as witness on the enlistment paper of Lilian May Carter. On her attestation paper, she gave 1881 as her year of birth making her 34 years old at time of enlistment, one year short of the nurse’s maximum enlistment age of 35.

July 19th : Joined the 1st Canadian General Hospital in Etaples. She was with the 4th British General Hospital before that posting with 21 other Canadian nursing sisters.

January 14th, 1916 : Sent to England for duty

August 9th : Invalidated to Villa Tino Hospital. On leave until August 12th.

November 27th : Posted at the Duchess of Connaught hospital.

November 29th : Granted 10 days leave. Returned on December 9th.

February 13th, 1917 : Hospitalized at the Duchess of Connaught hospital

February 14th : 14 days leave. Returned on February 27th.

February 23rd : Awarded the Royal Red Cross 2nd class (A.R.R.C.) decoration and received it from the hands of the King George V himself (London Gazette 29959 February 23rd, 1917).

March 3rd : Discharged from the hospital.

March 14th : Granted 14 days leave

April 17th : Arrived in France. Posted with the 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital in Doullens

November 18th: On command at the 48th Casualty Clearing Station (British). Rejoined unit on December 9th.

December 11th: Granted 14 days leave. Leave extended until January 5th

May 4th, 1918 : Admitted at the 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital in Abbeville. Transferred to the QAIMNS Hospital on May 15th. Struck of strength of the 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital on May 23th. Transferred to the Canadian Red Cross hospital in Buxton on June 5th

July 12th : Taken on strength with the 14th Canadian General Hospital

November 28th : Struck of strength of the unit and sent to Casualty company

November 26th : Posted with the 16th Canadian General Hospital

December 26th : Admitted to the 16th Canadian General Hospital. Still on the sick list on January 12th

January 14th, 1919 : Admitted to the Canadian Red Cross hospital (laryngitis, bronchitis)

February 2nd : Posted with the 16th Canadian General Hospital.

February 25th : Admitted to the Canadian Red Cross officer hospital in London

March 7th : A medical board declared her medically unfit for any military service

May 21st : Sailed to Canada on the HMT Araguay. Arrived in Canada on May 30th

June 6th : Posted at Hastings Park in Vancouver, British Columbia

July 15th : Demobilized in Vancouver

November 30th, 1929 : Married Edward Lawrence Slevin (from B.C. Archives Microfilm Number: B13757 ). He died on February 2nd, 1953.

1936 : Living at 4643 10th avenue Vancouver, British Columbia

December 9th, 1965 : Died in Shaughnessy in Vancouver, British Columbia

Nursing Sister Mary Catherine English A.R.R.C.

Mary Catherine English served with the Canadian Army Medical Corps during WW1. She is entitled to the Royal Red Cross 2nd class, the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

Born on May 11th, 1877 in Keady, Armach County, Ireland
Trade : nurse                                Religion : Roman Catholic
Status : Single                               Height : 5′ 3″
Eyes : grey                                     Hair : Medium brown
Weight : 140 lbs.
Name of her brother : Frank English  Address : Keady, Armach County, Ireland

September 28th, 1912: She left Glasgow, Scotland on the Grampian for Montréal, Canada.

February 5th, 1915 : To be a nursing sister (G.O. 26)

May 1st : Sailed from Canada on (MO 267).

May 12th : She signed her enlistment paper in London, England (Kingslay Hotel 34 Victoria Street) but she enlisted in Montreal on May 1st. She gave the Bank of Montreal on Peel’s street as the place for the deposit of her pay check May 12th : Posted to the 2nd Canadian Stationary Hospital (Le Touquet). July 27th transferred to England.

August 1st: Transferred to the 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital in South Hampton, England Sailed to Malta then Alexandria en route to the Aegean sea. August 16th : Reached the port of Mudros on the Greek island of Lemnos. August 22nd : The 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital became operational on the island and they received their first patient the next day at 10:00 pm

The hospital was part of a relief effort sent to help overcrowded Anzac medical services who could not take the large influx of wounded soldiers from the Gallipoli campaign which was getting worst. The Canadian Hospital was hastily sent to the island and they were not prepared to served under these conditions. Many of its members felt hill to disentry, some even died on the island.

December 4th: She suffered from jaundice and was evacuated from Mudros the ship SS Mauritania.

December 14th: Hospitalised at the Queen Alexandria Nurse Hostel

December 29th to February 1st, 1916: Hospitalised at the Granville Special Hospital in Ramsgate
February 2nd : Declared fit for service and posted at the Granville Special Hospital

February 23rd, 1917: Awarded the Royal Red Cross 2nd class (A.R.R.C.) decoration and received it from the hands of the King George V himself (London Gazette 29959 February 23rd, 1917). There is a note in the log book of the Granville Special Hospital in Ramsgate to the effect that Mary Catherine English received the Royal Red Cross with Christine Elizabeth Cameron, Rebecca Hervey, Minnie McAffee, Cordelia M. Motherwell et Jean Horton Roberston.

April 12th : Transferred to the 16th Canadian General Hospital from Granville Canadian Special Hospital

September 16th : Transferred to the 3rd  Canadian General Hospital (in Jesuit’s College in Boulogne, France)

March 3rd, 1918 : 14 days permission (returned to unit March 16th)

July 8th, 1918 : Transferred from the 2nd Canadian General Hospital to the 8th Canadian General Hospital There was a mistake made in the logbook of the unit since she was suppose to be transferred to the 8th C.S.H. Comment in the war diary made by matron Georgiana Pope : “Exceedingly sorry to loose one of our best nurse and most intelligent”

July 10th : Taken on strength with the 8th Canadian General Hospital in St-Cloud, France

July 29 : Taken on strength on reposting from the 3rd Canadian General Hospital

September 9th : 14 days permission to Ireland. Rejoined unit from permission on September 24

December 11th : Reposted to 5th District Canadian Forestry Corps for duty

January 12th, 1919: Reposted to the Canadian Forestry detention hospital in La Joux (Jura). This was a small hospital of 150 beds.

February 21st : Transferred to the 2nd Canadian Stationary Hospital (Outreau).

March 25th : Transferred to the 11th Canadian General Hospital (Moore Barracks, Shorncliffe).

May 26th to 28th : Transferred the 15th Canadian General Hospital (Taplow).

May 26th : Transferred to the 11th Canadian General Hospital (Moore Barracks, Shorncliffe) until June 1st.

June 14th: Sailed from South Hampton, England on board the S.S. Aquitania
June 20th: Arrived in Halifax. She was on the same ship as George Duncan Campbell.

July 1st 1919 : Demobilised

September 7th, 1925 : Died of Carcinom of rectum in Dublin, Ireland

Send to Canadian Records November 30th, 1925.

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Mary Catherine English 1916 (on the left)

click on the images to enlarge

Certificate for her War Service Badge (obverse and reverse)

Army paper (Farm Records) showing cause of death

Nursing Sister Jessie Madeline Elliott

Nursing Sister Jessie Madeline Elliott served with the Canadian Army Medical Corps during WW1. She is entitled to the 1914-15 Star, the British War medal and the Victory medal.

Born in June 1888 in Toronto, Ontario

Trade : nurse        Status : single    Religion : Baptist

Height : 5′ 3″       Eyes : blue            Hair : dark

Weight : 125 lbs.
Name of her father : William Henry Elliott                                    Address : 4 Maple eve, Rosedale, Toronto
Name of her husband : William Easson Brown, physician         Address :10 Carlton Street, Toronto, Ontario

January 26th 1915 : Appointed Nursing Sister

February 8th : Sailed from Canada on SS Zealand and docked in Liverpool. She signed her enlistment paper in London, England on February 24th. She was a good friend of nursing sister Helen Fowlds and she is mentioned several time in her letters from February 1915 until the end of March of the same year. In those letters she is described as the Holly’s type and a straight person. From the information in the letters it is possible that she share her room with nursing sister Margaret M. Rose.

March 19th : Posted with the 2nd Canadian General Hospital. All the nursing sisters arrived that day to open the Hospital in Le Treport

October 2nd : Attached with the 2nd Canadian General Hospital in Abbeville

October 24 : Transferred from the 7th B.G.H. to the 3rd B.S.H. in Rouen

10 days permission from February 5th, 1916 to the 14th.

October 25th 1916: 14 days permission

January 22nd : Received her order to proceed to England from the 2 C.G.H.. Proceeded on January 25th. Posted with the 16th Canadian General Hospital in Orpington on January 26th.

January 31st, 1917 : Posted in the London, England area.

Returned to Canada on February 2nd onboard SS Missanabe

April 17th : Returned to the 16th Canadian General Hospital in Orpington.

October 5th : Returned to the 16th Canadian General Hospital in Orpington on

Hospitalised from 7th to the 18th of January 1918 at the Westcliffe Eyes and Ears Hospital for tonsilitis.

January 24th : Granted a leave until February 1st by the medical board

February 13th : She resigned her commission

November 10th, 1919 she received her War Service gratuity from the army, it was addressed to Mrs. Jessie Madeline Brown 10 Carlton Street, Toronto, Ontario

Probably buried in Hamilton cemetery, Ontario

January 26th, 1915 : Appointed nursing sister.Hamilton cemetery

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From right to left : Nursing sister Jessie Madeline Elliot, Nursing sister Margaret M. Rose, Nursing sister Lena I. Boy, Captain John Parnell Walsh, Nursing sister Bernadette Loneragau and Nursing sister Rachel Jone
Picture taken SS Zealand on route to England (February 1915)
elliot2-picture