Category Archives: surname S

Private Peter Scott

Private Peter Scott (service number 3759) served with the 1st battalion Scots Guards. He is entitled to the Egypt Medal (no clasp)

1882 Egypt Medal no clasp

McNish-W

He was born on January 15th, 1860 Old Monkland, Coatbridge, Lanark County, Scotland

On November 14th, 1876 he enlisted with the Scots Fusilier Guards in Edinburgh, Scotland. He joined the regiment on November 21st in London. He was a deserter who enlisted under the name of Andrew Falconer

Trade: Cooper              Height: 5’ 7”                Hair: Hazel

Eyes: Light brown      Religion: Presbyterian

He was imprisoned from November 10th to 20th 1880 for assaulting a police officer while drunk.

From March 1880 until July 1882, he was hospitalized eight times gonorrhoea, syphilis and herpes.  He left hospital 3 days before their departure for Egypt.

December 20th 1881, the battalion was sent to Dublin Ireland. They returned to London in March of 1882.

July 30th 1882: The 1st battalion of the Scots Guards sailed from Albert Docks in London, England on the ship Orient. The Scots Guards Regiment was part of the Guards Brigade with the 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards, 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards and the 1st Battalion Scots Guards. Their commanding officer was Prince Arthur the Duke of Connaught (Queen Victoria’s 7th child).

August 12th: The battalion disembarked in Alexandria, Egypt

August 18th : From Alexandria they embarked to Ismaila. They arrived on August 22

August 24th: Guard’s brigade was held in support at Tel-El-Mikuta. They did some repair and clearing the Canal.

September 13th: Battle of Tel-el-Kebir.

He was hospitalized in Malta from September 14 until the 19th for dysentery. Since he was in Malta on September 14th, he could not have been at Tel-El-Kebir the day before for the battle explaining why he did not receive the clasp. His service file does not mention that he is entitled to it.

He came back to United Kingdom on October 14th. The regiment came back to United Kingdom on November 14th so I think he never left Malta after his hospitalization there.

He was hospitalized again in London from November 28th until December 22nd for hemorrhoids.

He was transferred to Army Reserve 2nd Military District on July 1st, 1883. He married Jane Mackenzie the next day July 2nd at St-Mary’s Church in Dundee, Scotland. He was stationed there until May 31st, 1884.

He was discharged on November 13th 1888 after completing 12 years for his short service period. His conduct was listed as “fair”.

Matron Margaret Heggie Smith – UPDATED (photos)

Matron Margaret Heggie Smith served in the Boer’s War and WW1 with the Canadian Army Medical Corps. She is entitled to the Royal Red Cross 1st class with bar, Queen’s South Africa Medal with no clasp, 1914-15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal.

Her medals are at the Bytown Museum in Ottawa.

2014-04-13 14.50.29

She was born May 24th, 1872 in Ottawa, Ontario

She was the daughter of William Heggie Smith of Ottawa.

She studied nursing at the Blockley Hospital in Philadelphia.

She enlisted in the Canadian Army Medical Corps to serve with the 19th Canadian Stationary Hospital in Harrismith, South Africa during the Boers’ War.

She returned to Canada in late July 1902.

She enlisted a first time on September 25th, 1914. She stated her address as 193 Slater Street, Ottawa, Ontario.

She was 5’ 6” and her religion was Presbyterian

I do not know why but she enlisted a second time on July 6th, 1917 in Orpington, England with the Ontario Military Hospital. On the paper her rank is Matron.

She served for two years in France, and 4 more years as Matron of the Ontario Military Hospital in Orpington, Kent, England, which became the No. 16 Canadian Field Hospital in 1917.

Photos of Margaret Smith in France

2014-04-13 14.41.24

2014-04-13 14.51.43

She was back in Canada in 1919

July 31st, 1919 : In recognition of her exceptional service, King George V awarded a bar to her her the Royal Red Cross. For the link of her award in the London Gazette click hereSmith LG

She died aged 47 on May 12th, 1920 in Atlantic City. Her funeral service at St. Andrew’s Church in Ottawa and conducted by the Reverend George Fitzpatrick. It was attended by a large number of military officers. Obituary from The Canadian nurse and hospital review : “But years of steady and strenuous duty had its undermining effect, and it was in somewhat impaired health that Matron Smith returned to Canada. After some months’ treatment, she had seemingly recovered her health: and it was whilst in the enjoyment of a well-merited holiday, with friends, at Atlantic City, that, without warning, she was elected to join those “Whom God has called to His mysterious rest.”

She is buried at the Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa, Ontario

Picture of her gravestone

From The Canadian nurse and hospital review of January 1921 “The tablet, which is of handsome design, occupies a prominent place beneath the choir gallery and bears the following inscription: “In affectionate memory of Matron Margaret Heggie Smith, R.R.C., and Bar. Died 12th May, 1920. A Member of the C. A. M. C. Nursing Service since 1902. Served in the South African War and over five years in the Great War. This Tablet is erected by the members of the Overseas C. A. M. C. Nursing Service.

 Picture of the tablet in her honor at St-Andrew’s Church in Ottawa, Ontario

The ceremony throughout was most impressive. Rev. Mr. Kilpatrick referred feelingly to the life of service and sacrifice led by Matron Smith, and pointed out the relation of such a life to other lives dedicated to Christ. There were three points of contact: 1, the inspiration of love; 2, the swift recognition of need, human and divine; 3, a measureless sacrifice. These things, the preacher said, should call forth notes of thanks giving and pride, as in the old days, at an hour of sacrifice, they sounded the trumpets and sang the songs of the Lord. The memory of Matron Smith, Rev. Mr. Kilpatrick said, should lead to a high resolution to keep faith with those who died for the nation.
As the preacher delivered the words “To the glory of God and in pride and loving memory this tablet is now dedicated,” Mrs. Meighen pulled the cord and a thin silk Union Jack fell away and revealed the tablet. This was followed by a brief dedicatory prayer and the singing of the Doxology.”

If you know more information on this lady, please leave me message so I can add it to her small biography

Drummer Ernest Sheppard

Drummer Ernest Sheppard  served with the 1st battalion Scots Guards during the 1882 Egypt Campaign. he is entitled to the Egypt Medal (clasp Tel-El-Kebir) and the Khedives Star 1882.

He was born on January 15th, 1860.

On July 10th, 1874 he enlisted at the Westminster Police Court with the Scots Fusilier Guards in London. He was 14 years and 6 months old boy,. He was 4’ 9”, had grey eyes and light brown hair.

His father was Giles, mother Eliza, sister Emilia and brother Frederick George, they were living at 24 Octavo Street in London.

He was appointed Drummer on September 26th, 1880. The band was composed of 25 members, of those 13 were drummer.

Picture showing a Scots Guards Drummer in Alexandria, Egypt on AUgust 12th 1882

Alexandria August 12 1882 b

Picture of showing 2nd battalion Scots Guards band uniform in 1885

Music band 2

July 30th 1882: The 1st battalion of the Scots Guards sailed from Albert Docks in London, England on the ship Orient. He was one of thirteenth Drummer who served with the regiment in Egypt.

August 12th: The battalion disembarked in Alexandria, Egypt

August 18th: From Alexandria they embarked to Ismaila. They arrived on August 22nd

August 24th: Guard’s brigade was held in support at Tel-El-Mikuta. They did some repair and clearing the Canal.

September 12th: The Guard’s Brigade was called-up is support to Graham’s Brigade at Kassassin

September 13th (early morning): Battle of Tel-el-Kebir. The Guard’s Brigade including the Scots Guards were held in reserve, by the time the regiment reached enemy’s parapet the battle was almost over.

The Scots Guards Regiment was part of the Guards Brigade with the 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards, 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards and the 1st Battalion Scots Guards. They were all under the command of His Royal Highness Prince Arthur the Duke of Connaught (Queen Victoria’s 7th child)

He came back to United Kingdom on November 14th.

Egypt Medal with clasp Tel-el-Kebir

Williams-W

He was appointed Lance-Corporal on December 31st, 1884

He was promoted to the rank of Corporal on April 1st, 1885

He was discharged medically unfit due to palpitations of the heart July 8th, 1886 in Richmond Barracks in Dublin, Ireland. His conduct was listed as “exemplary”

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Nursing Sister Sadie Saint-Germain – UPDATED

This is the story of Nursing Sister Sadie St-Germain who I decided to revisit since I found some new and interesting information on her. Not listed on the Official list of WW1 casualties but her cause of death was linked to her war service on an official Canadian Government document (see below). This put the total of casualties to 63 Canadian nurses serving with the Canadian Army Medical Corps died of cause related to war.

Nursing Sister Sadie Saint-Germain served with the Canadian Army Medical Corps during World War One. She is entitled to the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

She was born on July 21st 1884 in Hull, Quebec

She enlisted on August 10th, 1916 in Kingston, Ontario

Her mother was Mrs St- Germain and living at 321 James Street in Ottawa, Ontario

Height : 5’ 5’’1/2      Weight : 107 lbs.    Religion : Baptist

She sailed from Canada on August 16th, 1916 on SS Ascania.

She was hospitalised for a bronchitis on January 3rd, 1917. Everything was back to normal on February 14th.

She was attached to the Kitchener Military Hospital in Brighton on March 8th.

She proceeded to France on September 18th. She was transferred to the 1st Canadian General Hospital on arrival.

She was posted with the 2nd Canadian Stationary Hospital on December 21st, 1918.

She was posted with the 10th Canadian General Hospital on February 18th, 1919.

She sailed from England on May 13th on SS Northland and arrived in Halifax on May 23rd.

She was demobilised on May 26th, 1919.

She died on May 3rd 1923 .Buried in Saint-James Cemetery in Hull, Quebec
Obituary from the Ottawa Citizen May 4th, 1923.
St – Germain – Passed away suddenly May 3rd 1923, nursing sister St-Germain Funeral private from brother residence 122 Cartier Street. Please omit flower.

Below is Nursing Sister Sadie St-Germain Certificate the cause of death. Her death was related to her war service but no Memorial Plaque or Memorial Cross were issued to her family. Her file is quiet about that. Her brother was still alive when she died so technically he should have received one but he did not. Why? History is silent about that

Germain cause of death

If you know more information on this lady, please leave me message so I can add it to her small biography.

Nursing Sister Sadie St-Germain gravestone in St-James Cemetery in Hull (now Gatineau)

stone-sadie-st-germain

Private John Shaw

Private John Shaw served in the 5th Canadian Mounted Rifles (Québec regiment) in the Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War One. He is entitled to the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

He was born on April 29th, 1888 Montreal, Quebec

He enlisted on June 12th 1915 in the 5th Canadian Mounted Rifles regiment in Montreal, Quebec. He had served in the Home Guard before enlisting. His trade was butcher

Religion: Church of England    Height: 5′ 11″    Weight: 145 lbs

He was married to Hannah Marie Shaw who was living at 52 Richmond Street, Montreal

October 24th : He landed in France

September 29th 1916 : He received injury to head and face. Hit by an unknown projectile (probably shrapnel) at the Battle of Somme

March 10th 1917: He was transferred to the 2nd Quebec Regiment Depot

May 9th : He was transferred to the 23rd Reserve battalion

November 6th : He sailed to Canada on SS Olympic

November 21st : He was hospitalized in Montreal

January 18th 1918: He was discharged in Montreal (medically unfit). His address on discharge was 252 Guy Street

He was still alive in 1961

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Private John Shaw British War Medal

Private Donald Francis Smyth

Private Donald Francis Smyth served with 1st Quebec Regiment (Reinforcement battalion) with the Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War One. He is entitled to the British War Medal.

He was born on July 18th, 1894 in MOntreal, Québec.

He enlisted on October 27th 1917 in Montreal, Quebec in the 171st battalion. The regiment was disbanded in Canada and he was then transferred to the 1st Depot Battalion 1st Quebec Regiment

On enlistment his trade was clerk

Religion : Roman Catholic      Status : single

Height : 5′ 7″      Weight : 135 lbs.    Eyes : blue       Hair :Brown

Name of his father : Joseph Smyth   Name of his mother: Annie Smyth

His address was 31 1/2 rue Balmoral, Montreal

He embarked in Halifax on the SS Melita on April 17th, 1918 and arrived in England on April 28th.

He transferred to the 23rd Canadian Reserve Cyclist Battalion on July 12th. He never went to France andonly stayed in United Kingdom.

He embarked in Liverpool on the Celtic on March 10th, 1919 and arrived in Halifax on March 18th.

He was demobilised on March 20th, 1919.

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Private Donald Francis Smyth British War Medal

Captain Marjorie Simpson

Captain Marjorie Simpson served Queen Alexandra’s Royal Army Nursing Corps (Q.A.R.A.N.C.) at the end of World War II and during the Malayan Campaign. She is entitled to the Defence Medal, War Medal and the General Service Medal 1918-62 with clasp Malaya.

She was born in Newcastle-on-Tyne on June 1st, 1912.

She was appointed Nursing Sister (Lieutenant) in the Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Services on November 27th, 1945.

She transferred to the Q.A.R.A.N.C. on its formation on February 1st, 1949

She was promoted Captain on November 27th

She resigned her commission October 7th, 1954.

She was appointed Flight Officer in Princess Mary’s Royal Air Forces Nursing Service on April 1st, 1955.

She relinquished her commission on April 1st 1959.

She died in Bath in the third quarter of 1972 at the age of 60.

If you know more information on this lady, please leave me message so I can add it to her small biography.

Captain Marjorie Simpson medals with a QARANC shoulder badge

Simpson 2

Private John Joseph Satchell

Private John Joseph Satchell served in the 5th Canadian Mounted Rifles in the Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War One. He is entitled to the British war medal and the Victory Medal.

He was born on July 9th 1894 in Portsmouth, England

Trade : Driver   Religion: Church of England    Status : Single

Height : 5′ 9″  Weight : 148 lbs

Name of the father: William Satchell Address : 22 Hampshire street, Southsea Pourtsmouth

January 17th 1915 : He enlisted in Toronto, Ontario in the 166th battalion.

October 18th, 1916: Sailed for Europe on the SS Cameronians. Arrived in England on October 28th.

December 8th: He disembarked in France and was taken on strength with the 5th C.M.R. on December 25th.

May 16th 1918: Hospitalised for Hyperdermia. Returned to unit on October 1st

February 13th1919: He proceeded to England

March 8th: He sailed on the SS Carmenia from Liverpool and arrived in Montreal on March 17.

March 19 Demobilised

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Typical World War One medals pair

Private Charles Forbes Simpson

Private Charles Forbes Simpson served in the Canadian Army Medical Corps during World War One. He is entitled to the 1914-15 Star, British War Medal and the Victory Medal. His enlistment number was 03673. He received two War Service Badge, his badge class A # 256016 and his badge class B # 52851

Born on August 13th, 1897 in Sarnia, Ontario

Trade : Machinist     Religion :         Civil status : Single

Height  : 6′ 1″      Eyes : Blue    Hair : Fair       Weight  : 177 lbs.

Information from the 1901 Canadian Census

He was living in Sarnia, Ontario. His father’s name was Henry, his mother’s name was Mary. He was the last of 8 children.

June 26th 1915 : Enlisted in Sarnia, Ontario in the Canadian Army Medical Corps Reinforcement Depot 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital

August 1st : Sailed to Malta then to Alexandria en route to the Aegean sea.

August 16th : Reached the Port of Mudros on the Greek Island of Lemnos.

August 22nd : The 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital became operational on the island and they received their first patient at 10:00 am.

The hospital was part of a relief effort sent to help overcrowded Anzac medical services which could not take the large influx of wounded soldiers from the Gallipoli campaign. The Canadian Hospital was hastily sent to the island and they were not prepared to served under these conditions. It needed two nurses to change a patient wound dressing, one to change the dressing and one to fan out the flies of the wound (no joke here). Excessive heat and poor sanitary conditions were the contributing factors at spreading disease. Many of its members felt hill to disentry, some even died on the island.

He was there at the same time as Nursing Sister Mary Catherine English, John William Small, Mabel Clint and Nursing Sister Mary Frances Elizabeth Munro

October 8th : He was admitted to the hospital. He was discharged on October 14th.

November 21st: He was admitted again to the 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital. He was discharged on November 28th.

February 5th 1916 : The 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital left the Island of Mudros and arrived in Alexandria, Egypt on February 8th.

March 26th : The unit sailed from Egypt to England on the HMS Valdivia, transferred on the the HMS Britannic in Port Augusta, Sicily on March 28th and reached South Hampton, England on April 7th.

They were then put on another ship and sent to Havre, France where they arrived on April 8th. The unit was then taken by truck and lorries to Boulogne, France where they established their base.

July 23rd : Admitted (tonsillitis) to the 3rd Canadian Stationary Hospital

August 30th : Transferred to England on H.S Dieppe

May 9th, 1918 : Taken on strength to C.A.M.C. Depot in Shorncliffe

December 21st : Absent without a leave until January 31st, 1919. He was sentenced to 27 days forfeit pays.

February 2nd, 1919 : Invalidated to Canada

February 13th : Arrived in Portland, Maine on ship Araguaya

April 7th : Discharged

June 1st, 1973 : Died at the Cambridge Nursing Center in North Clawson

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Picture of Private Charles Forbes Simpson

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Paul Lawrence Swanburg

Paul Lawrence Swanburg served in the Merchant Marine during World War II and participated in the war effort. He is entitled to the 1939-1945 Star, the Atlantic Star, the Pacific Star, the Defence Medal and the Canadian Volunteer Service medal with the clasp denoting 18 months of active and volunteer service at war for Canada.

He was born in Shelburne, Nova Scotia in 1927. His father was Angus Mckay Swanburg and his mother was Margaret Swanburg nee Corbett

1930 United States Census: He is listed as living in Hapeville, Fulton, Georgia.

July 27th, 1943: He was hired as a Mess Boy on the S.S. Point Pelee Park in Halifax. He arrived in New York on August 6th.

October 3rd: He arrived in New York, U.S.A. from Halifax, Nova Scotia on the S.S. Colbron. He was employed as an assistant-cook. He lied about his age when he was hired, he said he was 18.

May 5th, 1944: He was hired as a Utility Boy on the S.S. Leaside Park. He was 5’10” and weighting 140 lbs.

May 27th: He arrived in New York, U.S.A. from South Hampton, United Kingdom.

October 13th: He arrived in Honolulu, Hawaii from Enewatak Island on the S.S. Leaside Park.

April 1st, 1945: He arrived in New York, U.S.A.

Medals attributed to Paul Lawrence Swanburg

Swamburg-P

December 15th, 1947: He left South Hampton to Halifax, Nova Scotia on the Aquitana. He is listed as a seaman

April 1st, 1948: He sailed on the ship Argofax from Rotterdam, Netherlands to New York, U.S.A.

April 13th: He was hospitalized in New York, U.S.A.

The ship was supposed to sail to Antwerp on April 24th.

Picture of Paul Swanburg

Picture Paul 2

1951: He married Lillian Jean Dalley

1962-63: He is listed as living at in Brighton and he is a tax collector

1965: He is listed as living at in New Minas and he is a tax collector

1972: He is listed as living in Kentville and he is a Fire Inspector, probably for the Kings Mutual comp.

He was also a former member of the New Minas Village Commission, serving through the mid 1970’s and 1980’s. He was also very active on the Village Water Commission and he owned Swanburg Insurance for many years.

From 1995 to 2011 he was living at 1005 Roy Ave, new Minas, Nova Scotia, in 2000 the town changed its name to Kentville and again in 2001 it amalgamated to Annapolis Royal.

August 11th, 2010: His wife Lillian Jean Swanburg nee Dalley passed away in Kentville, Nova Scotia.

August 6th, 2011: He died at Valley Regional Hospital in Kentville, Nova Scotia.

Obituary:Paul Lawrence Swanburg – 84, of New Minas, passed away Saturday, July 30, 2011 in the Valley Regional Hospital, Kentville.  Born in Shelburne, he was a son of the late Angus and Margaret (Corbett) Swanburg. He had been employed as a fire inspector with Kings Mutual and later owned and operated Swanburg Insurance for many years. He served with the Merchant Marines during the second World War and for his service he received the 1939-1945 Star, the Atlantic Star, the Pacific Star, the Canadian Volunteer Service Medal and Clasp and the War Medal 1939-1945. He was a former member of the New Minas Village Commission, serving through the mid 1970’s and 1980’s. He was passionate about various New Minas park projects and the New Minas Water Commission. He enjoyed maintaining his home and property.  He is survived by his children, Terrence “Terry” (Faye), Ontario; Perry (Shelley), Steam Mill; Gary (Marie), New Minas; Sherry, New Minas; Sally (Bill) Wallace, Wolfville; Shelley (Richard) Clayton, Fredericton; a brother, Karl (Phyllis), Tennessee; 11 grandchildren; two great grandchildren; nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his wife, the former Lillian Daley; three sisters, Margaret Fisher, Julia Griffin and Dr. Joyce Millett; a brother, Dr. Angus Swanburg. Cremation has taken place under the direction of the White Family Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Kentville. There will be no visitation, by request. The funeral service, followed by a reception, will be held at 11:00 a.m. Friday, August 5, 2011 in the White Family Funeral Home, Kentville, Reverend Doctor Randy Crozsman officiating. Burial will take place in the Elm Grove Cemetery, Steam Mill. Family flowers only, by request. Donations in memory may be made to the charity of your choice. Funeral arrangements have been entrusted to the White Family Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Kentville.”

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Nursing Member Margaret Louise Sampson

Margaret Louise Sampson # C 801 served with the #231 Nursing Division, St Catharines, Ontario with the St-John Ambulance of Canada. She received the The Most Venerable Order of St. John of Jerusalem , Officer Sister’s Badge and the St. John Service Medal, with 1 gilded clasp

She was born on May 16th 1913 in St-Catherine, Ontario

She joined St. John Ambulance Brigade in 1944 as a Nursing Member, Divisional Officer and Divisional Superintendent with #231 Nursing Division, St Catharines.

1956 : She received the St. John Service Medal for 12 years service with the St-John Ambulance of Canada.

February 8th, 1957 : She received a Priory Vote of Thanks for Valuable assistance rendered in the furtherance of the work of the Order in connection with the Priory of Canada.

1960 : She was promoted to the rank of Corps Staff Officer (Secretary) with the Lincoln Corps. She held this position until her death.

1961 : She received her first long service clasp for 17 years of service with the Ambulance.

1966 : She received her second long service clasp for 22 years of service with the Ambulance.

May 18th, 1969 : She had completed 25 years service and was rewarded by becoming a Serving Sister of the Order of St. John.

1971 : She received her third long service clasp (27 years).

1972 : She promoted to the rank of Officer Sister with the Order of St-John

1976 : She received her gold clasp long service bar denoting 32 years of service

1980 : She died on that year and was still serving with the St-John Ambulance after 36 years.

If you know more information on this lady, please leave me message so I can add it to her small biography.

Her Serving Sister Promotion Certificate

Priory Vote of Thanks for Valuable assistance certificate

Private Jack Sommerton

Private Jack Sommerton served in Royal Army Medical Corps in Palestine before WW2 and in United Kingdom during WW2. He is entitled to the General Service Medal with the clasp Palestine, the 1939-1945 War Medal, the Defence Medal and the Army Good Conduct and Long Service Medal. His enlistment number was 7261759.

June 5th 1912 : He was born in Russel, United Kingdom

1933 : He enlisted in the army

May 29th, 1937 : He arrived in Palestine as part of the 3rd company Royal Army Medical Corps.

April 9th, 1939 : He left Palestine

(July-August-September) : He got married to Beatrice E Allard St Albans and in the county of Hertfordshire

1939-1945 : He served in United Kingdom during WW2

March 2nd 1951: He received his Army Good Conduct and Long Service Medal

(March-April-May) He got married a second time to Muriel Gaunt Wirral in Cheshire.

1956 : His Palestine Medal was issued and according to the medal roll, he was a sergeant by then

December 1987 : He died

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Doctor Agnes Forbes Blackadder-Savill

Dr Agnes Forbes Savill served with the Scottish Women’s Hospitals as a radiologist, at the Royaumont Hospital during WW1. She is entitled to the British War and Victory Medals, French Médailles des épidémies 1st class. She also received the Scottish Women’s Hospitals Medal 1914, bronze. Her medals were sold at auction in December 2012.

She was born on 4th December 1875 in Dundee, Scotland. Her father, Robert, was an architect and civil engineer.

29 March 1895: She graduated first from the University of St. Andrews and received the degree of Master of Arts. She was the first female graduate from St-Andrews University.

She went on to study at University College, Dundee in 1897/1898 and Queen Margaret College for Women in the University of Glasgow. According to the University of Glasgow website “She was a gifted medical student. In addition to taking first prize in Practical Pathology in 1896, she had a string of First Class Certificates in Materia Medica, Surgery, Midwifery, Ophthalmology and Insanity and a Second Class Certificate in Anatomy,”

She graduated on 21st July 1898 obtaining an MB and ChB, and her MD in 1901.

She married Dr. Thomas Dixon Savill at the Church of St Mary Magdalene, Forfarshire in 1901.

After her marriage her career took her to London, where she became a consultant in Dermatology and Electro-therapeutics. She also gained experience in radiological work, which would prove very useful during the war.

In 1904 she became a Member of the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland.

June 5th, 1905: She arrived in Glasgow, Scotland from New-York, United-States on the Numidian

In 1907 she had the distinction of being appointed as a consultant to a hospital which was not exclusively for women, St. John’s Hospital for Skin Diseases. In addition she was a consultant at the South London Hospital for Women. At the same time as making a successful career for herself in London, she was a respected suffragette.

1910: Her husband died

1911 United Kingdom Census: Listed as a physician and living at 38 Audley House, Margaret Street, London W

November 12th : She arrived in Glasgow, Scotland from New-York, United States on Caledonia

In 1912 she was one of three distinguished doctors (the other two being male surgeons), who conducted an inquiry into the appalling treatment of women hunger strikers in prison and published papers on the subject.

At the same time, she also went out to France for several work periods, returning to her post in London when she could, usually in the winter when there was a lull in the fighting. Her great contribution was in making the best use of a state-of-the-art x-ray car which they had been given, courtesy of the French General Le Bon. She had an acute appreciation of the dangers and mechanisms of gas gangrene and worked hard to mitigate its effects with prompt diagnosis and treatment. Her studies of the x-ray appearances of the gangrene were pioneering. She trained staff and threw herself into the work so selflessly that in July 1918, during a particularly busy period, it was noted that she looked ill and ‘absolutely cavernous’.

She developed an interest in Dermatology and became a Physician to the Skin Hospital, Leicester Square, London.

Early in the Great War she joined the staff of the Scottish Women’s Hospitals, entering France in May 1915. Serving at Royaumont Hospital, about 25 miles from Paris, she was placed in charge of the x-ray and electro-therapy departments. She served there until the end of 1916.

Her military medals

click on the image to enlarge

She returned to London after the war and lived first at 66 Harley Street and later 7 Devonshire Place.

July 24th, 1919: She arrived in Glasgow, Scotland from Boston, United State on the Massilia.

While continuing to pursue her own career, she also undertook to edit her husband’s textbook, Savill’s System of Clinical Medicine, a task she continued to do up to 1942. She was elected a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland, only the sixth woman to receive this honour. Her intellectual interests continued to grow.
Agnes recognised how powerful an influence music could be, and wrote a book about its importance to well-being, entitled Music, Health and Character. Its publication in 1923 caused a stir and later led to the establishment of the Council for Music in Hospitals.

From 1923 to 1938 she was living in St Marylebone, Westminster

October 11th, 1937: She arrived in Southampton, England from New-York, United States o the Berengaria

She was the author of several books and papers on her own subjects; she was also editor of her late husband’s Clinical Medicine.

In 1955 she published the book Alexander the Great and his Times which can still be bought on Amazon

She was still seeing patients into her seventies.

She died on 12 May 1964. She left 58 552 GBP

Picture of Doctor Agnes Forbes Blackadder-Savill, she is forth from the right

click on the images to enlarge

Pacific Para Trooper

Pacific Para Trooper is a new blog; the author is transposing his father, Everett Smith, scrapbook into a blog. His father served with the 11th Airborne in the Pacific during WW2. His story is not just about war but life at war. His letters are very interesting and give an honest firsthand account on what was really going on there.

You can read his blog by clicking here

Private James Smith

Private James Smith (service number 5736) served in the 2nd battalion Scots Fusiliers Guards from 1856 to 1876. He did not served in any armed conflict or military campaign. He is entitled only to the Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal.

Born in April of 1834 in Glasgow , Scotland

Height : 5’ 8”             Hair : Dark brown

Eyes : Hazel              Trade : printer

April 4th, 1856: Enlisted in the 2nd Battalion Scots Fusiliers Guards

September 1858 : The 2nd battalion was stationed for a year in Dublin, Ireland

December 21st, 1861: Due to the Trent Affair (Fenians) in Canada, England decided to reinforce her military presence in Canada. The 2nd battalion Scots Fusiliers Guards left for Canada on the SS Parana (December 19th according to the official history of the regiment). They arrived in Sydney Harbour, Nova Scotia on January 6th. They then sailed to Halifax and then St-John New-Brunswick where they disembarked on January 19th.

On February 9th, they then took a sleigh ride from St-John to Rivière-du-loup, Quebec where they entrained and went to Montreal.

Drawing of the sleigh ride to Rivière-du-loup from the book The Scots Guards 1642-1914

They arrived in Montreal on February 11th and were billeted at Victoria’s Barrack.

October 10th, 1864: Him and the battalion were back in United Kingdom. He served abroad for almost 3 years.

Picture of Victoria’s Barrack in Montreal, Canada (1866)

April 4th, 1865: He reengaged for a period of 11 years.

May 23rd, 1876: He took his discharge from the Army. He served with the Scots Guards between the two major conflicts of the period (Crimea – Egypt 1882).

August 15th : He received his Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal. He is not entitled to any other medal.

Typical uniform for British soldiers in Canada 1865

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.