Private John Shaw

Private John Shaw served in the 5th Canadian Mounted Rifles (Québec regiment) in the Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War One. He is entitled to the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

He was born on April 29th, 1888 Montreal, Quebec

He enlisted on June 12th 1915 in the 5th Canadian Mounted Rifles regiment in Montreal, Quebec. He had served in the Home Guard before enlisting. His trade was butcher

Religion: Church of England    Height: 5′ 11″    Weight: 145 lbs

He was married to Hannah Marie Shaw who was living at 52 Richmond Street, Montreal

October 24th : He landed in France

September 29th 1916 : He received injury to head and face. Hit by an unknown projectile (probably shrapnel) at the Battle of Somme

March 10th 1917: He was transferred to the 2nd Quebec Regiment Depot

May 9th : He was transferred to the 23rd Reserve battalion

November 6th : He sailed to Canada on SS Olympic

November 21st : He was hospitalized in Montreal

January 18th 1918: He was discharged in Montreal (medically unfit). His address on discharge was 252 Guy Street

He was still alive in 1961

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Private John Shaw British War Medal

Nursing Sister Jessie Nelson King

Nursing Sister Jessie Nelson King served with the Canadian Army Medical Corps during World War One. She is entitled to the British War Medal and Victory Medal.

She was born on June 8th, 1892 in North Vancouver, British Columbia

Height : 5′ 4″     Weight : 128 lbs.           Religion : Anglican

She graduated from the provincial Royal Jubilee Hospital in Victoria British, Columbia in 1916.

She enlisted on April 28th, 1917 in Victoria, British Columbia

She sailed from Canada o May 30th, 1917 and disembarked in England on June 14th.

Posted with the 9th Canadian Stationary Hospital on June 21st, 1917.

She was posted with the 12th Canadian General Hospital on October 12th and transferred to the 1st Canadian General Hospital on November 8th, 1917.

She was hospitalized at the 14th General Hospital in Wimereux for influenza on November 2nd, 1918.

hospitalized on March 5th, 1919 at the 14th Stationary Hospital (Dangerously ill, condition desparate)

On March 30th she was still dangerously ill (condition unchanged)

She died on April 4th, 1919 at the 14th Stationary Hospital in Boulogne at the age of 26 (cerebro spinal meningitis). She is buried in the British cemetery in Terlincthun, France XIV. A. 2.

Medals (British War Medal, Victory Medal), Memorial Plaque and Scroll and the Memorial Cross were sent to her mother Clara Amy King at 1246 Balmoral Road Victoria, British Columbia

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Picture of her gravestone

Nursing Sister Elizabeth Josephine McLoughlin

Nursing Sister Elizabeth Josephine McLoughlin served in the Queen Alexandria Imperial Nursing Service during World War One.

She died died on April 4th, 1927 and is buried in the military section of Mount-Royal Cemetery, Montreal

Obituary from Montreal Gazette April 5th, 1927

McLoughlin, Elizabeth Josephine

In this city, on April 4th, 1927, Elizabeth Josephine McLoughlin, nursing sister, Q.A.I.M.N.S. in her 40th year. Funeral from the William Wray Chapel 617 University Street on Wednesday April 6th 1927 at 7:45 am to Saint-Patrick thence Cote des Neiges Cemetery.

Private Josaphat Delisle

Private Josaphat Delisle served with the 3rd Pioneer Battalion with the Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War One. He is entitled to the British War Medal and Victory Medal.

British War medal and Victory Medal

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He was born on April 3, 1891 in Valleyfield, Quebec.

He signed his Attestation Paper with the 57th Regiment, Canadian Engineers on September 27, 1915 in Montreal, Quebec, at the age of 24, naming his next-of-kin as his wife, Sarah Belduc (probably Bolduc) Delisle of Longueuil, Quebec.

He stated that he had no previous military service, that he was married.

His trade was that of Auto Mechanic. Three days later, he was transferred to the 41st Battalion “Canadiens Francais” on September 30th. The Battalion sailed October 18th aboard the S.S. Saxonia, arriving in England on October 28, 1915.

Three weeks later, he was sentenced to Field Punishment No. 1 for being absent without leave at parade at Bramshott, forfeiting one days’ pay, on November 12th.

He was transferred to the 3rd Canadian Pioneer Battalion on February 19, 1916, landing in France three weeks later, on March 9th. He was nine days in the French theatre, on March 18th, when he suffered a gunshot (shrapnel) wound to his right elbow at Ypres. He was admitted to No. 1 Canadian Field Ambulance, and then transferred to No. 1 Casualty Clearing Station the same day. The following day, he was transferred to No. 2 Canadian Stationary Hospital, where the “Shrapnel (was) removed.

He did endure a fever from the 20th to the 26th, spiking on the 22nd at almost 104 F but eventually it subsided. On March 27th, he was invalided to England aboard the Hospital Ship Cambria, where he was transferred to King George’s Hospital, Stamford St., London on the 28th, taken on strength at the Canadian Casualty Assembly Centre at Folkestone on April 4th.

After five weeks at King George’s Hospital, he was transferred to the Grand Duchess George of Russia Hospital at Harrogate on May 3, 1916, where he was to spend the next five months, before being transferred again, this time to the 2nd Northern General Hospital at Leeds on October 15th, for an additional month’s hospitalization. He was subsequently transferred to the Canadian Convalescent Hospital, Woodcote Park at Epsom on November 16, 1916. In his Medical Report of an Invalid, dated December 9, 1916 at Epsom, it confirmed that he was injured at Ypres on “17.3.16 (when) shrapnel struck him on right elbow, shattering the joint, that he was “wounded on active service in the presence of the enemy”. It was recommended that he be invalided to Canada, his general health declared to be “good”. Although his early operation consisted of “washing out (of the) wound & removal of (the) shrapnel”, his disability was determined to be “permanent”, that the extent of his capacity for earning a full livelihood in the general labour market lessened at present to “1/2 permanently. Evidence in (his) papers of infection in (the) wound, forearm fixed in position, midway between pronation and supination. Elbow solidly fixed at right angles. Right arm involved.” He was discharged December 19th and placed on command to the Canadian Convalescent Depot at Hastings on December 22nd. He ceased to be attached to the CCD and was struck off strength at Buxton for Canada, on January 13, 1917.

Three days later, he embarked Liverpool aboard the S.S. Northland on January 16th. In his Proceedings of a Medical Board at Discharge Depot Report, dated January 26, 1917 at Quebec City, Quebec, it was noted that his elbow was fixed at a 90 degree angle, that his degree of incapacity was as 30% and that the condition was permanent. It rendered him permanently unfit for military service, and that an “operation, special treatment or the use of appliances, etc., to lessen incapacity” was approved.

He was discharged from the Army on March 2nd and his pension was granted the following day. Almost nine months went by and Delisle re-attested with the 3rd Canadian Pioneer Battalion, signing his second Attestation Paper on November 30, 1917 at Montreal, naming his wife, Sarah, as his next-of-kin, stating that he had previous military service with the 41st Battalion CEF, that he was married and that his trade was that of Mechanic.

He also stated that he had previously been discharged as “Medically Unfit” due to a shrapnel wound to his right elbow. Three weeks later, while at Military District No. 4 Depot in Montreal, he was admitted to Grey Nuns Convalescent Home at Montreal on December 18th. It noted that about November 26th, that Delisle had “noticed pain and swelling below (the) elbow.”

In his Medical History of an Invalid, dated January 4, 1918 at Montreal, it stated that he had three visible scars, the third of which was at the “site of (the) incision for draining of an abscess, developed about three weeks ago. It was recommended that he be declared Category “E” (unfit for service )

He was discharged from Grey Nuns Convalescent Home on January 12, 1918 and put on outpatient status. Ten days later, he was discharged from the Army again, on January 22, 1918 at Montreal.

As he was declared Class 3, his pension was granted on March 3, 1917.

served with the 3rd Pioneer Battalion with the Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War One. He is entitled to the British War Medal and Victory Medal.

He was born on April 3, 1891 in Valleyfield, Quebec.

He signed his Attestation Paper with the 57th Regiment, Canadian Engineers on September 27, 1915 in Montreal, Quebec, at the age of 24, naming his next-of-kin as his wife, Sarah Belduc (probably Bolduc) Delisle of Longueuil, Quebec.

He stated that he had no previous military service, that he was married.

His trade was that of Auto Mechanic. Three days later, he was transferred to the 41st Battalion “Canadiens Francais” on September 30th. The Battalion sailed October 18th aboard the S.S. Saxonia, arriving in England on October 28, 1915.

Three weeks later, he was sentenced to Field Punishment No. 1 for being absent without leave at parade at Bramshott, forfeiting one days’ pay, on November 12th.

He was transferred to the 3rd Canadian Pioneer Battalion on February 19, 1916, landing in France three weeks later, on March 9th. He was nine days in the French theatre, on March 18th, when he suffered a gunshot (shrapnel) wound to his right elbow at Ypres. He was admitted to No. 1 Canadian Field Ambulance, and then transferred to No. 1 Casualty Clearing Station the same day. The following day, he was transferred to No. 2 Canadian Stationary Hospital, where the “Shrapnel (was) removed.

He did endure a fever from the 20th to the 26th, spiking on the 22nd at almost 104 F but eventually it subsided. On March 27th, he was invalided to England aboard the Hospital Ship Cambria, where he was transferred to King George’s Hospital, Stamford St., London on the 28th, taken on strength at the Canadian Casualty Assembly Centre at Folkestone on April 4th.

After five weeks at King George’s Hospital, he was transferred to the Grand Duchess George of Russia Hospital at Harrogate on May 3, 1916, where he was to spend the next five months, before being transferred again, this time to the 2nd Northern General Hospital at Leeds on October 15th, for an additional month’s hospitalization. He was subsequently transferred to the Canadian Convalescent Hospital, Woodcote Park at Epsom on November 16, 1916. In his Medical Report of an Invalid, dated December 9, 1916 at Epsom, it confirmed that he was injured at Ypres on “17.3.16 (when) shrapnel struck him on right elbow, shattering the joint, that he was “wounded on active service in the presence of the enemy”. It was recommended that he be invalided to Canada, his general health declared to be “good”. Although his early operation consisted of “washing out (of the) wound & removal of (the) shrapnel”, his disability was determined to be “permanent”, that the extent of his capacity for earning a full livelihood in the general labour market lessened at present to “1/2 permanently. Evidence in (his) papers of infection in (the) wound, forearm fixed in position, midway between pronation and supination. Elbow solidly fixed at right angles. Right arm involved.” He was discharged December 19th and placed on command to the Canadian Convalescent Depot at Hastings on December 22nd. He ceased to be attached to the CCD and was struck off strength at Buxton for Canada, on January 13, 1917.

Three days later, he embarked Liverpool aboard the S.S. Northland on January 16th. In his Proceedings of a Medical Board at Discharge Depot Report, dated January 26, 1917 at Quebec City, Quebec, it was noted that his elbow was fixed at a 90 degree angle, that his degree of incapacity was as 30% and that the condition was permanent. It rendered him permanently unfit for military service, and that an “operation, special treatment or the use of appliances, etc., to lessen incapacity” was approved.

He was discharged from the Army on March 2nd and his pension was granted the following day. Almost nine months went by and Delisle re-attested with the 3rd Canadian Pioneer Battalion, signing his second Attestation Paper on November 30, 1917 at Montreal, naming his wife, Sarah, as his next-of-kin, stating that he had previous military service with the 41st Battalion CEF, that he was married and that his trade was that of Mechanic.

He also stated that he had previously been discharged as “Medically Unfit” due to a shrapnel wound to his right elbow. Three weeks later, while at Military District No. 4 Depot in Montreal, he was admitted to Grey Nuns Convalescent Home at Montreal on December 18th. It noted that about November 26th, that Delisle had “noticed pain and swelling below (the) elbow.”

In his Medical History of an Invalid, dated January 4, 1918 at Montreal, it stated that he had three visible scars, the third of which was at the “site of (the) incision for draining of an abscess, developed about three weeks ago. It was recommended that he be declared Category “E” (unfit for service )

He was discharged from Grey Nuns Convalescent Home on January 12, 1918 and put on outpatient status. Ten days later, he was discharged from the Army again, on January 22, 1918 at Montreal.

He was declared Class 3, his pension was granted on March 3, 1917.

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Private George Charles Flynn

Private George Charles Flynn  served in the 1stbattalion of the Scots Guards Regiment during the Boers’ War. He is entitled to the Queen South Africa with clasps Belfast, Orange Free State, Cape Colony. He is also entilted to the King South Africa with the clasps South Africa 1901 and 1902.

He was born in June of 1876 in Cork, United Kingdom

Trade : seaman     Religion : Roman Catholic   Hair : brown

Height : 5′ 8″    Weight : 150 lbs         Eyes : grey

He is not listed in the 1881 United Kingdom census.

June 11th, Served as escort for the guns in the Diamond Hill attack

Private George Charles Flynn enlistment papers

October 16th, 1899: The 1st Battalion Scots Guards was inspected at Chelsea Barracks

May 23rd, 1900 : He left for South Africa with the regiment

April 29th,1901 : They arrived back in Bloemfontein

May 12th: The regiment entered Kronstad

May 31st: The regiment entered Johannesburg

June 5th : The regiment entered Pretoria

June 11th : The battalion served as escort for the guns in the Diamond Hill attack

August 4th : Entered Middleburg

August 26th : Battle of Belfast

July 10th, 1902 : The battalion entered Bloemfontein for garrison duty until the end of the war

September 9th : Left Bloemfontein for Cape Town. Embarked on the Winifridian on September 13th and arrived in Southampton on October th

October 6th : They received their Queen South Africa medal from the hands of His Royal Highness

February 4th, 1903: He received the King South Africa medal

May 10th, 1910 : He left the army

Typical Boers War medals pair

Staff-Sergeant Christopher Jones Arnold

Staff-Sergeant Christopher Jones Arnold served with the 14th battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War One. He died while serving in United Kingdom. He was entitled to the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. His mother received the Memorial Plaque and Memorial Cross

He was born on December 29, 1888 in Wolverton, Buckinghamshire, England.

He enlisted on September 21, 1914 at Camp Valcartier, Quebec with the 14th Infantry Battalion, naming his next-of-kin as his mother, Mrs. Louisa Arnold of Wolverton, He stated that he had four years’ service with an Active Militia as a member of the 3rd Regiment Victoria Rifles, that he was not married and that his trade was that of Pattern Maker.

Height: 5’ 6”               Weight: 140 lbs.         Eyes: grey

Hair: fair         Religion: Church of England

The Battalion sailed to England on October 3 aboard the S.S. Andania,

He was appointed Arm. Staff Corporal on January 1, 1915.

He left for the French theatre on August 1, joining the 14th Battalion in the field on the 4th.

He was appointed Arm. Corporal on September 25. He returned to the Canadian Base Depot on October 23rd, remaining there until November 20th, when he rejoined the 14th Battalion.

He was stuck off strength of the 14th Battalion and transferred to the Canadian Ordnance Corps on April 30, 1916. He was promoted to Arm Sergeant the next day, May 1st and transferred to the 13th battalion.

He reported “sick” two days after his transfer, to No. 14 Stationary Hospital at Wimereux with a suspected Enteric Fever on May 2nd. After three weeks, he was invalided and transferred “sick” to England, his condition stated as “Paratyphoid Slight”.

He soon found himself at the University War Hospital at Southampton on the 27th and diagnosed with Paratyphoid.

After ten days and no improvement in his condition, he was transferred to Ardington Park at West Croydon on June 6th and diagnosed Paratyphoid. He was transferred again, this time to Wear Bay Typhoid Convalescent Hospital on June 30, where he was to spend the next two months, to August 29, then transferred to the Military Hospital at Shorncliffe on the 30th and subsequently discharged, after four months hospitalization.

He required an additional three weeks at the Canadian Casualty Depot Monks Horton before he was struck off strength to the Canadian Ordnance Corps at Ashford on September 20.

He was later posted to the 13th Infantry Battalion for a short time.

He contracted German Measles and was admitted to “Isolation” at Moore Barracks Hospital at Shorncliffe on January 18, 1917. On February 6th, he was transferred to the Westcliffe Eye and Ear Hospital at Folkestone, diagnosed with Otitis Media (middle ear infection) and discharged two weeks later on the 22nd.

He soon saw a transfer from the Canadian Casualty Assembly Centre to the Canadian Ordnance Corps. He is documented as being “on command” at the Ordnance College in Woolwich on October 1, remaining there until February 8, 1918.

He was stuck off strength and proceeded overseas on February 28, taken on strength by the Canadian Ordnance Corps at Ashford on March 1st.

One week later, he was transferred to the 1st Canadian Infantry Battalion in Western Europe on March 8th. He soon saw another appointment, this time to Acting Arm. Staff Sergeant with pay on April 1st.

He was admitted to No. 3 Canadian Field Ambulance on June 5 and diagnosed Pyrexia of Unknown Origin and discharged the same day.

He was confirmed in the rank of Arm. Staff Sergeant in the field on July 1 while with the Canadian Ordnance Corps.

He was transferred to the 19th July Infantry Battalion at Witley on October 10th and returned to the Canadian Ordnance Corps on October 26th.

He was taken on strength at the Canadian Base Depot for disposal on October 29th before being transferred to England and posted to the General Depot at Witley on November 1st, whereupon he was taken on strength at the General Depot from the Canadian Ordnance Corps on November 4th.

He was admitted to the 11th Canadian General Hospital at Shorncliffe on November 6th with Chronic Bronchitis. In his medical records, it was noted that he was “seriously ill” and re-diagnosed with “Subacute, Malignant Endocarditis”. He had acquired a “cough” that lasted “most, all of the time”, combined with a shortness of breath, loss of weight and night sweats. His condition worsened over the next two weeks, to the point where he passed away on November 19, 1918.

In February of 1921, his mother, received his 1914-15 trio, The Memorial Plaque and Scroll and the Memorial Cross.

1914-15 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal

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Private Donald Francis Smyth

Private Donald Francis Smyth served with 1st Quebec Regiment (Reinforcement battalion) with the Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War One. He is entitled to the British War Medal.

He was born on July 18th, 1894 in MOntreal, Québec.

He enlisted on October 27th 1917 in Montreal, Quebec in the 171st battalion. The regiment was disbanded in Canada and he was then transferred to the 1st Depot Battalion 1st Quebec Regiment

On enlistment his trade was clerk

Religion : Roman Catholic      Status : single

Height : 5′ 7″      Weight : 135 lbs.    Eyes : blue       Hair :Brown

Name of his father : Joseph Smyth   Name of his mother: Annie Smyth

His address was 31 1/2 rue Balmoral, Montreal

He embarked in Halifax on the SS Melita on April 17th, 1918 and arrived in England on April 28th.

He transferred to the 23rd Canadian Reserve Cyclist Battalion on July 12th. He never went to France andonly stayed in United Kingdom.

He embarked in Liverpool on the Celtic on March 10th, 1919 and arrived in Halifax on March 18th.

He was demobilised on March 20th, 1919.

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Private Donald Francis Smyth British War Medal

Stoker Bertrand Wallace Watson

Stoker Bertrand Wallace Watson served in the Royal Navy during Wolrd War One. He is entitled to the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

He was born on April 6th, 1889 in Vealston, Devonshire

Trade : Farm labourer        Height : 5’ 4’’

July 20th, 1902 : He enlisted in Devonport in the Royal Navy

September 4th, 1907 to August 6th, 1910 : He was posted on the HMS Defiance (torpedo school ship)

October 10th, 1907 : He was promoted Stoker 3rd class

August 7th 1910 to February 13, 1911 : He was posted on the HMS Cornwall (armoured cruiser)

February 14th, 1911 to May 11th, 1911 : He was posted on the HMS Vivid

July 20th, 1912 to November 22nd, 1912 : He was promoted Stoker 2nd class and posted on the HMS Vivid

November 13th, 1912 to November 16th, 1915 : He was posted on the HMS New Zealand (battleship part of the 1st battle cruiser squadron)

August 21st, 1913 : He was promoted Stoker 1st class

Battle of Heligoland Bight : August 28th, 1914 and

Battle of Dogger Bank : January 15th, 1915

November 17th, 1915 to December 16th, 1915 : He was posted on the HMS Vivid

December 17th to June 30th, 1917 : He was posted  on the HMS Isis (Protected cruiser)

September 5th, 1917 to January 31st, 1918 : He was posted  on the HMS Leander

February 1st to July 9th : He was posted on HMS Vivid

July 10th to October 31st : He was posted on the HMS Eagle (aircraft carrier)

September 17th, 1920 to July 18th, 1922 : He was posted on the HMS Constance (Light cruiser)

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Pictures source : Imperial War Museum

November 11th, a time to pause and remember

On the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, it is time to pause and remember those who fought on the battlefield, those who never came back and those on whom war left scars and wounds

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Pictures taken at Beechwood and Notre-Dame Cemetery in Ottawa, Canada

Private Charles Reeves

Charles Reeves served in the 2nd battalion (Ottawa) Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War One. He is entitled to the 1914-15 Star, the British War medal and the Victory Medal

He was born on September 1st, 1880 in Ventnor, Isle of Wight

1881 Census : address 14 Commercial Tap, Ventnor, Hampshire, England

Father : Edward Reeves born in 1845     Mother : Fanny Reeves born in 1844

Brother : Edward W. Reeves born 1875   Brother : George Reeves born in 1879

Brother : Thomas reeves born in 1877

The family had two lodger James Allen (1858) and Henry Arrow (1856)

March 31st, 1901 : He was single and a butcher assistant, living with his parent at 15th Surrey street in Ryde, Isle of Wright.

He enlisted on September 22nd, 1914 in Valcartier, Quebec in the 2nd battalion G company . His trade was barman. His wife was Alice Reeves and she was living at 188 Sulton Road, Portsmouth, United Kingdom

Religion : Church of England        Height : 5′ 8″

Eyes : grey          Hair : pale        Weight : 152 lbs

September 30th  : He sailed from Quebec on the SS Cassandra. The ship arrived in Gaspe Basin on October 2nd and departed from there on October 4th.  They arrived in England on October 15th, disembarked around 10:00 pm and got on Salsbury Plain on the 16th.

November 14th : The 2nd battalion was inspected by the King. They did drill, physical training and musket training. They began to practice attack at regimental level around mid-December.

February 4th, 1915 : The 2nd battalion was inspected by the King again.

He was fined 2 $ on January 26th for being drunk in public

February 7th : Him and the regiment proceeded to Amesbury. They arrived in Avenmouth on the 8thand embarked on the SS Blackwell. They disembarked in St Nazaire, France on February 11th.

February 17th : The regiment arrived in Armentieres

March 12th : They were inspected by General Smith Dorien

April 23rd : They arrived in the St Julien sector for the St-Julien battle. 2nd battalion was heavily involved in the battle of St-Julien.

May 2nd : Rest standing at Arras

May 15th : He had a concussion after an artillery exploded near him

June 11th : Back to the trenches near Givenchy

June 17th : The 2nd battalion was relieved by the 7th batt. (heavily shelled during that stay)

June 28th : The battalion was back to the trenches

July 5th : Relieved by the 15th batt.

July 14th : Back to the trenches near Wulverghem

July 18th : Relieved by the East York Regiment

July 19th : Back to the trenches near Neuve Eglise

July 29th : They were relieved by the 16th batt.

August 7th : Back to trenches near Ploegesteert

August 27th : Relieved back to the billet

He was admitted to the 2nd Canadian Field Ambulance on September 4th. He was transferred to the 3rd Canadian General Hospital on September 17th and transferred to the Convalescent Depot on September 23rd. He was finnally shipped to England on October 23rd.

He was diagnosed with shell shock. He was transferred where he won’t have to go to the front line.

He was sent back to Canada because there is no more job for him in England. He embarked on the SS Metagama in Liverpool, England on January 4th, 1919 and arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick on January 16th.

He was demobilised on February 26th.

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Private Charles Reeves British War Medal

Corporal George Ross Hovell

Corporal George Ross Hovell served with the 24th battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War One. He is entitled to the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and Victory Medal.

1914-15 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal

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He was born on January 16, 1893 in Aubroath, Scotland.

He signed his Attestation Paper with the 24th Infantry Battalion “Victoria Rifles” in Montreal, Quebec, on November 2, 1914, naming his next-of-kin as his mother, Mrs. A. Hovell of Vancouver, British Columbia

He stated that he had no previous military service, and he was single. His trade was that of Lithographer.

The Battalion was raised and mobilized in Montreal on March 15, 1915, Hovell arriving in England aboard the S.S. Cameronian on May 20th. After four months, he embarked for the France where he landed on September 15, 1915. He arrived in in Boulogne, France on the next day.

On October 22, 1915, he sustained an injury to his left foot while in the trenches at Kemmel, Belgium, in what was described the next day at No. 6 Canadian Field Ambulance on the 23rd, as a “Fallen Ankle”. He was transferred to the Australian Hospital at Wimereux on the 26th and diagnosed with “Flat Foot”, after which he was transferred to No. 15 Casualty Clearing Station on the 26th, placed on No. 17 Ambulance Train and sent to Boulogne, then invalided to England aboard the H.S. Cambria on the 27th.

He was taken on strength by the 39th Battalion at West Sandling, transferred to Great North Central Hospital at Holloway, beginning a series of hospital visits that included Chelsea Hospital, 1st London General Hospital R.A.M.C., the Canadian Convalescent Hospital at Bromley and, by February 15, 1916, the Canadian Convalescent Assembly Centre at Bath. He returned to Bromley where he was discharged on March 30th and established on command there, “Waiting for special (a) boot.” for his “Flat Foot” and placed “On light duty.”

Once the boot arrived, he was transferred to the Duke of Edinburgh’s R.C. Hospital at Hyde Park, then later, to the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire Hospital in London, where, on November 18, 1916, he was also credited with having completed his two years’ service with Good Conduct, entitling him to wear one Good Conduct Badge. He continued his rehabilitation, as he was admitted to the Petrograd Red Cross Hospital in London on November 25, 1918.

It was during his time at Petrograd that he was granted permission to marry on April 23, 1919, marrying Henrietta Hovell of London, England, on June 4th at St. Mark’s Church, Dalston, London.

He was named Acting Corporal, with his new unit, the Canadian Army Medical Corps on May 1st. In his Medical History of an Invalid, dated June 26, 1919 at No. 3 Southampton Street, London, it made note of the “rupture of ligaments of (the) left foot”, that occurred on October 22, 1916 at Kemmel, Belgium, due to the twisting of the foot. It went on to state that the “Left foot is very flat and is inverted. It was determined that his disability was to be “Permanent”. Hovell was placed on command to the 2nd Canadian District Depot and was struck off strength and discharged in England by K.B. & O. at the Canadian Red Cross Officers’ Hospital on October 1, 1919.

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Captain Marjorie Simpson

Captain Marjorie Simpson served Queen Alexandra’s Royal Army Nursing Corps (Q.A.R.A.N.C.) at the end of World War II and during the Malayan Campaign. She is entitled to the Defence Medal, War Medal and the General Service Medal 1918-62 with clasp Malaya.

She was born in Newcastle-on-Tyne on June 1st, 1912.

She was appointed Nursing Sister (Lieutenant) in the Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Services on November 27th, 1945.

She transferred to the Q.A.R.A.N.C. on its formation on February 1st, 1949

She was promoted Captain on November 27th

She resigned her commission October 7th, 1954.

She was appointed Flight Officer in Princess Mary’s Royal Air Forces Nursing Service on April 1st, 1955.

She relinquished her commission on April 1st 1959.

She died in Bath in the third quarter of 1972 at the age of 60.

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Captain Marjorie Simpson medals with a QARANC shoulder badge

Simpson 2

Captain Charles Edward McCloghry

Captain Charles Edward McCloghry served in the Royal Army Medical Corps during the military campaign in Palestine in 1939 and during World War Two

He is entitled to the General Service Medal with clasp Palestine, the Africa Star, the Defence Medal and the War Medal

He was born on November 11th 1912 in Rusheen, Irish Republic. He was the son of James Palmer McCloghry and Matilda McCloghry, of Ballincar, County Sligo, Irish Republic. His father was a veterinarian and he had a brother, Henry Palmer McCloghry.

He entered the Faculty of Medicine of the Belfast University in 1930.

He passed his 1st medical examination in March and June of 1932:

He passed his 2nd medical examination in June of 1933

December 1936: He passed his last medical examination and he graduated from the Faculty of Medicine and he received his Bachelor in the Art of Obstetrics (B.A.O.)

April 23rd, 1937: He enlisted as a Lieutenant in the Royal Army Medical Corps

From May 1st to September 31st he was on his Junior Course at RAMC College in London.

After his graduation from RAMC Medical College and before his service in Palestine, he served as medical officer at the medical reception station in Beverley, Leicester and York.

He left United Kingfom on September 23rd and arrived in Haifa, Palestine on November 22nd.

April 23rd, 1938: He was promoted Captain

He was admitted to hospital on September 14 and stayed there until the 21st. On September 28th he appeared before a medical board in Haifa and was found unfit for duty (50%). He proceeded to United Kingdom October 16th on sick leave for two months.

January 29th, 1939: He disembarked in Haifa, Palestine from the SS Montcalm. On arrival he was appointed as the medical officer of the 1st battalion Royal East Kent Regiment

August 19th: He was appointed medical officer for the West York Regiment in Sarafand, Palestine.

August 29th: He left Palestine for Egypt and was attached to the 3rd Cavalry Field Ambulance

October 6th: He was posted with the 3rd Cavalry Field Ambulance. The unit moved to Abbasia, Egypt on October 11th.

October 15th: He was attached to the 8th Hussars as the medical officer. He was with the regiment until December 18 and then transferred back to the 3rd Cavalry Field Ambulance.

March 3rd, 1940: He proceeded with the Indian Division for an exercise.

March 13th: He was admitted to hospital and was discharged on April 22nd.

March 29th: He was attached to the Rifles Brigade as a medical officer and was admitted to the 2nd Field Ambulance on June 11th and later transferred to the 5th General Hospital. He was found permanently unfit for service on July 1st and to United Kingdom on October 21st.

He died at the Renislow Hospital in Durban, South Africa on March 18th, 1941. He is buried in Stellawood Cemetery in Durban South Africa.

His WW2 medals were despatched to his family in February of 1949

He is commemorated on the Queen’s University (Ireland) War Memorial. The memorial is situated in front of the main University building in University Road, Belfast. He is also commemorated on page 77 of the electronic version of the Book of Remembrance of the University of Belfast.

Monument Belfast University

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Nursing Sister Evelyn Verra McKay

Nursing Sister Evelyn Verra McKay served in the Canadian Army Medical Corps during WW1. She is entitled to the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. She was one of the few female casualties of war and a Memorial Cross, Memorial Plaque and Scroll were issued to her parents.

She was born on September 24th 1892 in Galt, Ontario.

Height : 5′ 9″     Weight: 160 lbs.        Religion:Presbyterian

She enlisted on November 6th, 1916 in London, Ontario.

Picture of Nursing Sister Evelyn Verra McKay (before the war)

Sailed to England on December 9th 1916 on board ship Missanabie. Arrived in London on December 19th.

She was transferred to the 3rd Canadian General Hospital, Boulogne on August 25th, 1917.

She entered the 3rd Canadian General Hospital (as a patient) on October 30th, 1918 (dangerously ill),

She died on November 4th from a broncho-pneumonia at the age of 26.

Her medals (British War Medal, Victory Medal)  and Memorial Cross were sent her mother, Sarah Mckay, 85 Rose street  in Galt, Ontario. The Memorial Plaque and Scroll were sent to her father Mark McKay.

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Picture of Nursing Sister Evelyn Verra McKay gravestone

Captain Daniel Ellsworth Munn

Captain Daniel Ellsworth Munn served with the 47th battalion and the Royal Canadian Regiment during World War One. He is entitled to the 1914-15 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal.

British War Medal and Victory Medal

Pailthorpe medals

He was born on May 30, 1887 in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, the son of Angus and Sarah Agnes Munn, of New Westminster, British Columbia. He signed his Attestation Paper as a Lieutenant with the 47th Infantry Battalion, on March 24, 1915 in New Westminster,

He named his next-of-kin as his father, Angus, stating that he had previous military service with the 6th Regiment Duke of Connaught’s Own Rifles and the 104th Regiment Westminster Fusiliers of Canada. He was not married and that his trade as that of Estate & Insurance Broker.

The Battalion sailed to United Kingdom on November 13, 1915. He was later transferred to the Royal Canadian Regiment and soon found himself in the French theatre.

He was admitted to No. 9 Field Ambulance suffering from Influenza and Constipation and transferred to Mont des Cats the same day, June 13, 1916. He was again transferred, this time to No. 12 Casualty Clearing Station, where he received further treatment before rejoining his unit on July 7th. He was named Acting Captain on November 8, 1916; however, six months later, he was wounded during a trench raid on December 10, 1916. He was transferred to No. 3 General Hospital at Le Treport with a “slight gunshot wound to his scalp” on December 17th. He was absent from the ceremony where he was to receive his promotion to Captain, as he was still recovering from wounds.

He was evacuated to England via the Hospital Ship Dunluce Castle and transferred to Mrs. Arnold’s, 47 Roland Garden S.W. British Hospital on the 24th. Upon further assessment, he has suffering from gunshot wounds to his right forehead (temporal region) and the second finger on his right hand. He “had headaches for sometime after (the) injury” and by the end of December it was noted that “this Officer suffered the disability. Wounds healed. General health good except for lack of energy.”, although his “nervous system (was) somewhat weakened.” He was discharged on the 30th and deemed “unfit for service” for one month following his discharge, until being cleared for service beginning on January 29, 1917.

The following week, he proceeded overseas to rejoin the Royal Canadian Regiment on February 6, 1917, arriving in France on the 7th. He was transferred to the 3rd Entrenchment Battalion on February 11th and named Temporary Captain on February 28, 1917.

He was in command of “A” Company, stationed on the left side of the ridge, when he was wounded on the latter half of the first day of action, late on April 9 or early on April 10 at the Battle of Vimy Ridge. He was hospitalized at No. 6 Casualty Clearing Station and died from his wounds on April 18, 1917, at the age of 29. He is buried at Barlin Communal Cemetery at Pas de Calais, France.

His father, Angus, received his medals, plaque and scroll, while his mother, Sarah, received his Memorial Cross.