Tag Archives: Canadian Forces

Warrant-Officer Francis John Waddel

Warrant-Officer Francis John Waddel served with Canadian Army Ordinance Corps during World War One. He is entitled to the British War medal, Army Meritorious Service Medal and Permanent Forces of the Empire Beyond the Seas Long Service and Good Conduct Medal.

He was born on May 1, 1882 in Chatham, Kent, England.

He enlisted with the Canadian Ordnance Corps on July 19, 1912 at Halifax, Nova Scotia. He named his next-of-kin as his mother, Winifred Waddell of Chatham, England, stating that he had 8 years’ previous military service with the Army Ordnance Corps (May 1903 to May 1911), that he was not married and that his trade was that of Soldier.

He was appointed Lance Corporal on October 1, 1914, leaving for service in England shortly thereafter and was taken on strength from Canada at Ashford, Kent, England on February 1, 1915.

Eighteen days later, he signed his CEF Attestation Paper with the Canadian Ordnance Corps on February 19, 1915 at Salisbury, England.

He was promoted the following month, to Corporal on March 1st and re-engaged for a further period of three years’ general service with the Canadian Ordnance Corps at Ashford, Kent on July 19, 1915.

He was promoted to Staff Sergeant on October 1, 1915, to Staff Sergeant on February 2, 1916, Sergeant on April 1, 1916 and to Squadron Quartermaster Sergeant on June 1, 1916.

He proceeded to Liphook on command for temporary duty on July 20, 1916, later on command at Crowborough from November 15 to 17, 1916, then proceeded to Pluckley on command from January 19 to 29, 1917, before returning to No. 1 Detachment Canadian Ordnance Corps at Ashford.

He was granted permission to marry Edith Randall on April 26, 1917 at Ashford. Together they had two children: Francis William who was born on May 15, 1918 while at Ashford, the other is unnamed in his records.

He was to be Acting Sub Conductor (Warrant Officer, Class I) with pay and allowances on February 4, 1918 and signed his Re-Engagement Paper on July 22, 1918, re-engaging for three years’ service at Ashford, Kent, later being named Acting Conductor on August 1st.

He was transferred from No. 1 Detachment at Ashford and was placed on command to No. 2 Detachment at Ashford on May 21, 1919.

He was awarded his Meritorious Service Medal, in recognition of valuable service rendered in connection with the war on June 13, 1919. He ceased to be on command at No. 2 Detachment on rejoining No. 1 Detachment Canadian Ordnance Corps at Liphook on June 18th. He was then placed on command to No. 7 Detachment COC at Witley on June 23rd, saw a promotion to Staff Sergeant on August 18th, then struck off strength of No. 7 Detachment to No. 2 Canadian Ordnance Corps at Liphook on December 31st.

Waddell was struck off strength to No. 1 Detachment Canadian Ordnance Corps at London on February 1, 1920 and by the end of the month, was struck off strength of No. 1 COC on transfer to Canada and attached to the CEF in England on February 29th.

The following day, he was taken on strength from the Overseas Military Forces of Canada at London on March 1st to overseas detachment. He was to remain in England for next six months, before being struck off strength of the overseas detachment to Canada for further duty, embarking on the S.S. Grampian and arriving in Canada on September 29, 1920 and was discharged in Ottawa on October 1st, stating his proposed residence as Halifax, Nova, Scotia. He never went to France so he is not entitled to the Victory Medal.

He signed his Permanent Force of Canada Attestation Paper with the 6th Detachment of the Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps at Halifax on October 15, 1920.

He was listed as Category A (General Service). He saw a provisional promotion to Squadron Quartermaster Sergeant at Halifax on November 20th, then reverted to the rank of Staff Sergeant on August 1, 1921.

He was discharged on July 18, 1922 as a Staff Sergeant at Halifax, “In consequence of his service being no longer required”, with his conduct noted as “Exemplary”.

For his long service, Waddell was awarded the Permanent Forces of the Empire Beyond the Seas Long Service and Good Conduct Medal.

He and his wife later moved back to England, settling in Ashford where he died on January 26, 1979, at Ashford, County Kent, at the age of 96, his death attributed to a combination of cardiac failure in conjunction with myocardial degeneration, along with carcinoma of his bladder. He had also been diagnosed with senility and dementia.

Corporal Kenneth Michael Germaine

Corporal Kenneth Michael Germaine served with the Princess Patricia Canadian Light Infantry during the period of the Cold War. He served with the United Nations in the Sinai Desert and in Israel. He is entitled to the United Nations Emergency Force Middle East Medal Sinai desert, United Nations Disengagement Observation Force Medal Israel/Syria and the Canadian Forces Decoration.

He enlisted into 3rd battalion Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry in Esquimalt, British Columbia on April 24th 1972.

He started serveing in Cyprus on November 9th 1975

He was back in Esquimalt, British Columbia on May 9th 1976

The mission was established in June 1974 to supervise the cease-fire between Israel and Syria; to supervise the disengagement (redeployment) of Syrian and Israeli forces; and, to establish a buffer zone, as provided in the Agreement on Disengagement between Israeli and Syrian Forces of 31 May 1974. The Mission continues to perform its functions effectively with the cooperation of the parties.

He was posted in Baden, Germany with 3rd Royal Canadian Regiment on September 6th 1976

He was posted in Gagetown, New Brunswick on July 14th 1980.

He was posted in Alert, Canada on March 20th 1991.

He was discharged on February 1st 1993

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Corporal Kenneth Michael Germaine medals

Germaine 1

Private John McLeod

Private John McLeod served with the Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War one. He is entitled to the 1914-15 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal.

Typical WW1 medasl trio

Brewer-H

He was born on October 11, 1883 in Stornoway, Scotland.

He enlisted with the 48th Infantry Battalion on March 31, 1915 in Victoria, British Columbia, he named his next-of-kin as his father, J. McLeod of Stornoroy.

He stated that he had previous military service with the 88th Regiment, Victoria Fusiliers, that he was not married and that his trade as that of Blacksmith.

The 48th Battalion sailed July 1, 1915 aboard the R.M.S. Grampian, arriving in England on July 10th.

He was transferred to the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles Brigade on October 15, 1915 for service in the French theatre and placed with the 4th Canadian Mounted Rifles on January 2, 1916 in France. McLeod was wounded at the Battle of St. Eloi, suffering severe shrapnel wounds to his right forearm and admitted to No. 4 General Hospital at Camiers on April 11th. After three days, he was invalided wounded to England on the 14th and admitted to Kitchener Hospital in Brighton on the 15th, then transferred to the Canadian Division Convalescent Hospital, Woodcote Park at Epsom on June 8th.

After two months hospitalization in France and England, he was discharged on July 12th and transferred to the 35th Reserve Battalion. He saw another transfer, this time to the Canadian Machine Gun Depot at Crowborough on August 13, 1916, before being transferred to the Machine Gun Pool on February 7, 1917.

He arrived in France the following day and joined his new unit, the 13th Machine Gun Company in the field on the 14th. He was wounded at Vimy, suffering shrapnel wounds to both arms and shrapnel fragments in his left knee on May 3, 1917. He was admitted to No. 10 Stationary Hospital at St. Omer on May 5th, subsequently invalided to England one week later, and admitted to Military Hospital at Bagthorpe, Nottingham on May 12th. After two months treatment, he was transferred to the Canadian Convalescent Hospital, Bearwood at Wokingham on July 14th, then discharged four weeks later on August 11th and posted to the 3rd Canadian Command Depot at Hastings. The knee continued to bother McLeod, as fragments remained embedded in his knee. He was admitted to the Canadian Military Hospital at Eastbourne on August 30th, where an attempt was made to rectify the situation. A month later, he was discharged on September 29th and returned to the 3rd Canadian Command Depot.

On January 1, 1918 he was posted to the Canadian Machine Gun Depot . In his Proceedings of a Medical Board document, dated April 18, 1918 at Seaford, Sussex, it noted the fragments of shrapnel in his left knee that were causing swelling and tenderness, with the doctor noting that McLeod “complains of pain in the left knee”. In another report, it noted that there was a “foreign body in (his) left knee joint” on November 18, 1918 and that he was somehow declared “Fit for Duty”. McLeod was attached to the Canadian Discharge Depot at Buxton for return to Canada, sailing on December 7, 1918 and later taken on strength at District Depot, Military District No. 11 in Vancouver, British Columbia.

In his Medical History of an Invalid, dated January 16, 1919 at New Westminster, British Columbia, it was noted that there was a “Foreign body in (the) left knee joint causing slight pain and stiffness in (the) joint.” It was recommended the he declared “Medically unfit.”

It also stated that he was now married to Mary McLeod of Vancouver. He was discharged by reason of “Medical Unfitness” on January 29, 1919 at District Depot, Military District No. 11 in Vancouver, British Columbia, credited with having served in France with the 4th Canadian Mounted Rifles.

He died on January 14, 1950, at the age of 66

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Staff-Sergeant Christopher Jones Arnold

Staff-Sergeant Christopher Jones Arnold served with the 14th battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War One. He died while serving in United Kingdom. He was entitled to the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. His mother received the Memorial Plaque and Memorial Cross

He was born on December 29, 1888 in Wolverton, Buckinghamshire, England.

He enlisted on September 21, 1914 at Camp Valcartier, Quebec with the 14th Infantry Battalion, naming his next-of-kin as his mother, Mrs. Louisa Arnold of Wolverton, He stated that he had four years’ service with an Active Militia as a member of the 3rd Regiment Victoria Rifles, that he was not married and that his trade was that of Pattern Maker.

Height: 5’ 6”               Weight: 140 lbs.         Eyes: grey

Hair: fair         Religion: Church of England

The Battalion sailed to England on October 3 aboard the S.S. Andania,

He was appointed Arm. Staff Corporal on January 1, 1915.

He left for the French theatre on August 1, joining the 14th Battalion in the field on the 4th.

He was appointed Arm. Corporal on September 25. He returned to the Canadian Base Depot on October 23rd, remaining there until November 20th, when he rejoined the 14th Battalion.

He was stuck off strength of the 14th Battalion and transferred to the Canadian Ordnance Corps on April 30, 1916. He was promoted to Arm Sergeant the next day, May 1st and transferred to the 13th battalion.

He reported “sick” two days after his transfer, to No. 14 Stationary Hospital at Wimereux with a suspected Enteric Fever on May 2nd. After three weeks, he was invalided and transferred “sick” to England, his condition stated as “Paratyphoid Slight”.

He soon found himself at the University War Hospital at Southampton on the 27th and diagnosed with Paratyphoid.

After ten days and no improvement in his condition, he was transferred to Ardington Park at West Croydon on June 6th and diagnosed Paratyphoid. He was transferred again, this time to Wear Bay Typhoid Convalescent Hospital on June 30, where he was to spend the next two months, to August 29, then transferred to the Military Hospital at Shorncliffe on the 30th and subsequently discharged, after four months hospitalization.

He required an additional three weeks at the Canadian Casualty Depot Monks Horton before he was struck off strength to the Canadian Ordnance Corps at Ashford on September 20.

He was later posted to the 13th Infantry Battalion for a short time.

He contracted German Measles and was admitted to “Isolation” at Moore Barracks Hospital at Shorncliffe on January 18, 1917. On February 6th, he was transferred to the Westcliffe Eye and Ear Hospital at Folkestone, diagnosed with Otitis Media (middle ear infection) and discharged two weeks later on the 22nd.

He soon saw a transfer from the Canadian Casualty Assembly Centre to the Canadian Ordnance Corps. He is documented as being “on command” at the Ordnance College in Woolwich on October 1, remaining there until February 8, 1918.

He was stuck off strength and proceeded overseas on February 28, taken on strength by the Canadian Ordnance Corps at Ashford on March 1st.

One week later, he was transferred to the 1st Canadian Infantry Battalion in Western Europe on March 8th. He soon saw another appointment, this time to Acting Arm. Staff Sergeant with pay on April 1st.

He was admitted to No. 3 Canadian Field Ambulance on June 5 and diagnosed Pyrexia of Unknown Origin and discharged the same day.

He was confirmed in the rank of Arm. Staff Sergeant in the field on July 1 while with the Canadian Ordnance Corps.

He was transferred to the 19th July Infantry Battalion at Witley on October 10th and returned to the Canadian Ordnance Corps on October 26th.

He was taken on strength at the Canadian Base Depot for disposal on October 29th before being transferred to England and posted to the General Depot at Witley on November 1st, whereupon he was taken on strength at the General Depot from the Canadian Ordnance Corps on November 4th.

He was admitted to the 11th Canadian General Hospital at Shorncliffe on November 6th with Chronic Bronchitis. In his medical records, it was noted that he was “seriously ill” and re-diagnosed with “Subacute, Malignant Endocarditis”. He had acquired a “cough” that lasted “most, all of the time”, combined with a shortness of breath, loss of weight and night sweats. His condition worsened over the next two weeks, to the point where he passed away on November 19, 1918.

In February of 1921, his mother, received his 1914-15 trio, The Memorial Plaque and Scroll and the Memorial Cross.

1914-15 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal

Brewer-H

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

November 11th, a time to pause and remember

On the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, it is time to pause and remember those who fought on the battlefield, those who never came back and those on whom war left scars and wounds

002

004

006024 031 042

Pictures taken at Beechwood and Notre-Dame Cemetery in Ottawa, Canada

Corporal George Ross Hovell

Corporal George Ross Hovell served with the 24th battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Forces during World War One. He is entitled to the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and Victory Medal.

1914-15 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal

Brewer-H

He was born on January 16, 1893 in Aubroath, Scotland.

He signed his Attestation Paper with the 24th Infantry Battalion “Victoria Rifles” in Montreal, Quebec, on November 2, 1914, naming his next-of-kin as his mother, Mrs. A. Hovell of Vancouver, British Columbia

He stated that he had no previous military service, and he was single. His trade was that of Lithographer.

The Battalion was raised and mobilized in Montreal on March 15, 1915, Hovell arriving in England aboard the S.S. Cameronian on May 20th. After four months, he embarked for the France where he landed on September 15, 1915. He arrived in in Boulogne, France on the next day.

On October 22, 1915, he sustained an injury to his left foot while in the trenches at Kemmel, Belgium, in what was described the next day at No. 6 Canadian Field Ambulance on the 23rd, as a “Fallen Ankle”. He was transferred to the Australian Hospital at Wimereux on the 26th and diagnosed with “Flat Foot”, after which he was transferred to No. 15 Casualty Clearing Station on the 26th, placed on No. 17 Ambulance Train and sent to Boulogne, then invalided to England aboard the H.S. Cambria on the 27th.

He was taken on strength by the 39th Battalion at West Sandling, transferred to Great North Central Hospital at Holloway, beginning a series of hospital visits that included Chelsea Hospital, 1st London General Hospital R.A.M.C., the Canadian Convalescent Hospital at Bromley and, by February 15, 1916, the Canadian Convalescent Assembly Centre at Bath. He returned to Bromley where he was discharged on March 30th and established on command there, “Waiting for special (a) boot.” for his “Flat Foot” and placed “On light duty.”

Once the boot arrived, he was transferred to the Duke of Edinburgh’s R.C. Hospital at Hyde Park, then later, to the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire Hospital in London, where, on November 18, 1916, he was also credited with having completed his two years’ service with Good Conduct, entitling him to wear one Good Conduct Badge. He continued his rehabilitation, as he was admitted to the Petrograd Red Cross Hospital in London on November 25, 1918.

It was during his time at Petrograd that he was granted permission to marry on April 23, 1919, marrying Henrietta Hovell of London, England, on June 4th at St. Mark’s Church, Dalston, London.

He was named Acting Corporal, with his new unit, the Canadian Army Medical Corps on May 1st. In his Medical History of an Invalid, dated June 26, 1919 at No. 3 Southampton Street, London, it made note of the “rupture of ligaments of (the) left foot”, that occurred on October 22, 1916 at Kemmel, Belgium, due to the twisting of the foot. It went on to state that the “Left foot is very flat and is inverted. It was determined that his disability was to be “Permanent”. Hovell was placed on command to the 2nd Canadian District Depot and was struck off strength and discharged in England by K.B. & O. at the Canadian Red Cross Officers’ Hospital on October 1, 1919.

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Captain Daniel Ellsworth Munn

Captain Daniel Ellsworth Munn served with the 47th battalion and the Royal Canadian Regiment during World War One. He is entitled to the 1914-15 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal.

British War Medal and Victory Medal

Pailthorpe medals

He was born on May 30, 1887 in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, the son of Angus and Sarah Agnes Munn, of New Westminster, British Columbia. He signed his Attestation Paper as a Lieutenant with the 47th Infantry Battalion, on March 24, 1915 in New Westminster,

He named his next-of-kin as his father, Angus, stating that he had previous military service with the 6th Regiment Duke of Connaught’s Own Rifles and the 104th Regiment Westminster Fusiliers of Canada. He was not married and that his trade as that of Estate & Insurance Broker.

The Battalion sailed to United Kingdom on November 13, 1915. He was later transferred to the Royal Canadian Regiment and soon found himself in the French theatre.

He was admitted to No. 9 Field Ambulance suffering from Influenza and Constipation and transferred to Mont des Cats the same day, June 13, 1916. He was again transferred, this time to No. 12 Casualty Clearing Station, where he received further treatment before rejoining his unit on July 7th. He was named Acting Captain on November 8, 1916; however, six months later, he was wounded during a trench raid on December 10, 1916. He was transferred to No. 3 General Hospital at Le Treport with a “slight gunshot wound to his scalp” on December 17th. He was absent from the ceremony where he was to receive his promotion to Captain, as he was still recovering from wounds.

He was evacuated to England via the Hospital Ship Dunluce Castle and transferred to Mrs. Arnold’s, 47 Roland Garden S.W. British Hospital on the 24th. Upon further assessment, he has suffering from gunshot wounds to his right forehead (temporal region) and the second finger on his right hand. He “had headaches for sometime after (the) injury” and by the end of December it was noted that “this Officer suffered the disability. Wounds healed. General health good except for lack of energy.”, although his “nervous system (was) somewhat weakened.” He was discharged on the 30th and deemed “unfit for service” for one month following his discharge, until being cleared for service beginning on January 29, 1917.

The following week, he proceeded overseas to rejoin the Royal Canadian Regiment on February 6, 1917, arriving in France on the 7th. He was transferred to the 3rd Entrenchment Battalion on February 11th and named Temporary Captain on February 28, 1917.

He was in command of “A” Company, stationed on the left side of the ridge, when he was wounded on the latter half of the first day of action, late on April 9 or early on April 10 at the Battle of Vimy Ridge. He was hospitalized at No. 6 Casualty Clearing Station and died from his wounds on April 18, 1917, at the age of 29. He is buried at Barlin Communal Cemetery at Pas de Calais, France.

His father, Angus, received his medals, plaque and scroll, while his mother, Sarah, received his Memorial Cross.

Private John Joseph McAndrew

Private John Joseph McAndrew served in the Canadian Forestry Corps during WW1. He is entitled to the British War Medal only.

Born on April 28th, 1897 in Liverpool, England Trade : farmer

Religion : Roman Catholic     Status : Single      Hair: fair

Eyes : blue           Weight : 120 lbs          Height : 5′ 1″

Name of the sister : Sarah McAndrew

Address : 152 Nelson Street, Ottawa

1901 United Kingdom Census: Not listed

August 26th, 1916 : Enlisted in the 230th battalion in Ottawa, Ontario

January 26th, 1917 : Sailed form Halifax on SS Grampian. Arrived in England on February 6th

April 4th : Hospitalized for scabies

May 1st : Taken on strength at the Canadian Forestry Corps Headquarters in London, England

August 26th, 1918 : Awarded the good conduct badge

November 26th : Hospitalized for influenza. Released on December 19th

December 24th : Leave of absence. Returned January 2nd

March 23rd, 1919 : Sailed to Canada

April 1st : Discharged in Ottawa

1967: He died

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Private John Joseph McAndrew British war Medal

Captain Aylmer McIntosh Gilbert C.D.

Captain Aylmer McIntosh Gilbert served in the Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineer (RCEME) during WW2 and the Korean War. He is entitled to th Canadian Volunteer Service Medal (no clasp), the 1939-1945 War Medal, the Canadian Korea Medal, the Canadian Volunteer Service Medal for Korea, the United Nations Service Medal Korea and the Canadian Decoration with clasp.

His father, Henry Victor Gilbert served with the Canadian Expeditionary Forces during WW1. His story can be found by clicking here

1935: He enrolled in the Non-Permanent Active Militia Ontario Regiment tank as a boy soldier

 

March 1936: He enrolled in the Non-Permanent Active Militia 98th Field battery. Honourably released in April 1938

 

March 1939: He transferred in the Royal Canadian Artillery

 

October 14th, 1941: He transferred in the 55th Field battery Canadian Artillery Canadian Army (Active forces) SA-64776

 

February 2nd, 1943: He was confirmed in the rank of Acting-Sergeant

 

April 14th: He was awarded the Canadian Volunteer Service Medal

 

July 1st: He was confirmed in the rank of sergeant

 

January 30th, 1946: He was accepted in the Interim Force

 

July 12th: The War Service badge no 1079170 was issued to him

 

September 30th: He received the War Medal 1939-46. He enlisted at the RCEME School in Barriefield

 

October 25th, 1948: He transferred to no 6 RCEME in Halifax, Nova Scotia

 

February 21st, 1949: He was promoted Warrant Officer class II

 

October 19th, 1950: He transferred to RCEME in Kingston

 

November 17th: He transferred to CASF (Fort Lewis U.S.A.)

 

May 4th, 1951: He disembarked Far east (Korea) with the No. 25 Canadian Support Workshop

 

January 2nd, 1952: He started attending the Officer School candidate program in Borden, Ontario. He was given the service number ZA4896

 

July 16th: He was promoted Lieutenant with Royal Canadian Electrical and Mechanical Engineer

 

September: He was transferred to the 1st Radiation Detection Unit

 

December 15th, 1952 6:00: He was to proceed to Chalk River, Ontario. A nuclear accident just happened on December 12th. He returned from that assignment on December 20th 18:30. 170 military personnel were affected to the clean-up

 

January 13th, 1953: He was sent to the Canadian Army Staff in Washington. He was back from Washington in Barrifield on March 1st

 

January 18th, 1954: He received his Canadian Decoration (issue # 370)

 

April 1955: Armed forces special weapons project (U.S.A.)

 

May: He was transferred with the 1st Radiation Detection Unit

 

August: He was transferred to the Army Headquarter Quartermaster General Branch Directorate R.C.E.M.E.

 

June 9th, 1956: He was part of the Atomic Weapons Research Project (Operation Buffalo – United Kingdom) to Maralinga, Australia until November 16th. He was part of a select group of Australian, New Zealand, Canadian and British officers to see the effects of a nuclear explosion on target response items. These servicemen were known as the Indoctrination force.

Picture of the bomb explosion at Maralinga

December: He was transferred to the Army Headquarter Quartermaster General Branch Directorate R.C.E.M.E.

 

May 1957: He flew to Sydney, Australia from Vancouver, Canada

 

July 1957: He was part of the Atomic Weapons Research Project (United Kingdom)

 

October: Army Headquarter quartermaster General branch Directorate R.C.E.M.E.

 

July 11th, 1960: He was promoted to the rank of Captain

 

March 24, 1963: He arrived in Boston, Massachusetts. He departed on March 27th.

 

September 3rd, 1964: He arrived in London, England. He returned to Canada September 13

 

March 31st: He received the clasp for his Canadian Decoration (issue # 769)

 

March 26th, 1965: He arrived in Marville, France. He departed on April 4th. Marville was the site of a Canadian air base near Belgium border. The RCAF First Canadian wing had a tactical nuclear attack squadron stationed there.

 

March 1966: He was transferred to Materiel Command Headquarters CFB Rockcliffe

 

September 16th, 1968: He retired Canadian Forces headquarters. He is listed as living at Wolfdale Crescent Ottawa, Canada

 

February 4th, 1987: Received the Canadian Services Force pin

 

September 25th, 1992: He was awarded the Canadian Volunteer Service Medal for Korea

Picture of miniature medals attributed to Captain Gilbert