Tag Archives: Victorian war campaign

Private Peter Scott

Private Peter Scott (service number 3759) served with the 1st battalion Scots Guards. He is entitled to the Egypt Medal (no clasp)

1882 Egypt Medal no clasp

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He was born on January 15th, 1860 Old Monkland, Coatbridge, Lanark County, Scotland

On November 14th, 1876 he enlisted with the Scots Fusilier Guards in Edinburgh, Scotland. He joined the regiment on November 21st in London. He was a deserter who enlisted under the name of Andrew Falconer

Trade: Cooper              Height: 5’ 7”                Hair: Hazel

Eyes: Light brown      Religion: Presbyterian

He was imprisoned from November 10th to 20th 1880 for assaulting a police officer while drunk.

From March 1880 until July 1882, he was hospitalized eight times gonorrhoea, syphilis and herpes.  He left hospital 3 days before their departure for Egypt.

December 20th 1881, the battalion was sent to Dublin Ireland. They returned to London in March of 1882.

July 30th 1882: The 1st battalion of the Scots Guards sailed from Albert Docks in London, England on the ship Orient. The Scots Guards Regiment was part of the Guards Brigade with the 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards, 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards and the 1st Battalion Scots Guards. Their commanding officer was Prince Arthur the Duke of Connaught (Queen Victoria’s 7th child).

August 12th: The battalion disembarked in Alexandria, Egypt

August 18th : From Alexandria they embarked to Ismaila. They arrived on August 22

August 24th: Guard’s brigade was held in support at Tel-El-Mikuta. They did some repair and clearing the Canal.

September 13th: Battle of Tel-el-Kebir.

He was hospitalized in Malta from September 14 until the 19th for dysentery. Since he was in Malta on September 14th, he could not have been at Tel-El-Kebir the day before for the battle explaining why he did not receive the clasp. His service file does not mention that he is entitled to it.

He came back to United Kingdom on October 14th. The regiment came back to United Kingdom on November 14th so I think he never left Malta after his hospitalization there.

He was hospitalized again in London from November 28th until December 22nd for hemorrhoids.

He was transferred to Army Reserve 2nd Military District on July 1st, 1883. He married Jane Mackenzie the next day July 2nd at St-Mary’s Church in Dundee, Scotland. He was stationed there until May 31st, 1884.

He was discharged on November 13th 1888 after completing 12 years for his short service period. His conduct was listed as “fair”.

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Drummer Ernest Sheppard

Drummer Ernest Sheppard  served with the 1st battalion Scots Guards during the 1882 Egypt Campaign. he is entitled to the Egypt Medal (clasp Tel-El-Kebir) and the Khedives Star 1882.

He was born on January 15th, 1860.

On July 10th, 1874 he enlisted at the Westminster Police Court with the Scots Fusilier Guards in London. He was 14 years and 6 months old boy,. He was 4’ 9”, had grey eyes and light brown hair.

His father was Giles, mother Eliza, sister Emilia and brother Frederick George, they were living at 24 Octavo Street in London.

He was appointed Drummer on September 26th, 1880. The band was composed of 25 members, of those 13 were drummer.

Picture showing a Scots Guards Drummer in Alexandria, Egypt on AUgust 12th 1882

Alexandria August 12 1882 b

Picture of showing 2nd battalion Scots Guards band uniform in 1885

Music band 2

July 30th 1882: The 1st battalion of the Scots Guards sailed from Albert Docks in London, England on the ship Orient. He was one of thirteenth Drummer who served with the regiment in Egypt.

August 12th: The battalion disembarked in Alexandria, Egypt

August 18th: From Alexandria they embarked to Ismaila. They arrived on August 22nd

August 24th: Guard’s brigade was held in support at Tel-El-Mikuta. They did some repair and clearing the Canal.

September 12th: The Guard’s Brigade was called-up is support to Graham’s Brigade at Kassassin

September 13th (early morning): Battle of Tel-el-Kebir. The Guard’s Brigade including the Scots Guards were held in reserve, by the time the regiment reached enemy’s parapet the battle was almost over.

The Scots Guards Regiment was part of the Guards Brigade with the 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards, 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards and the 1st Battalion Scots Guards. They were all under the command of His Royal Highness Prince Arthur the Duke of Connaught (Queen Victoria’s 7th child)

He came back to United Kingdom on November 14th.

Egypt Medal with clasp Tel-el-Kebir

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He was appointed Lance-Corporal on December 31st, 1884

He was promoted to the rank of Corporal on April 1st, 1885

He was discharged medically unfit due to palpitations of the heart July 8th, 1886 in Richmond Barracks in Dublin, Ireland. His conduct was listed as “exemplary”

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography.

Private and police constable John Campbell

Private John Campbell  served with the 1st battalion Scots Guards during the Boers War and in World War One. Between those two conflicts he served as a police constable with the city of Glasgow, Scotland. He is entitled to the Queen South Africa Medal clasps Belfast, Orange Free State, Belmont, the King South Africa Medal, the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal, the Victory Medal and the 1903 Visit to Scotland Medal.

Private John Campbell medals

Campbell 4

John Campbell was born in Paisley, Renfrew, Scotland on March 9th, 1875, His father was James Campbell and his mother was Janet Hamilton.

1881 Scotland Census: He was living at 11 Castle Street in Paisley, Scotland. He had 4 sisters and 2 brothers

1891 Scotland Census: He was living at 105 Causeyside in Paisley, Scotland. He had 6 sisters and 3 brothers

He enlisted in the 1st battalion Scots Guards on December 28th, 1893. He said that he had some previous military service with the Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders. He joined the regiment in London on January 3rd. He was a laborer

Height: 5’ 10’’               weight: 135 lbs.           eyes: hazel       hair: dark brown

On June 12th, 1894 he completed his certificate of education 3rd class

July 1st, 1895: He was found sleeping at his post and was confined to his room. On August 6th, he was convicted to 49 days of prison. He returned to duty on August 24th.

Boers’ War

October 16th, 1899: The 1st Battalion Scots Guards was inspected by the Prince of Wales at Chelsea Barracks

October 21st: The battalion left Chelsea barracks and entrained at Nine Elm Station. They were part of the Guards Brigade with the 1st Division. They embarked on the Nubia and arrived in Cape Town, South Africa on November 13th.

November 21st: At 4h00 the battalion started advancing toward Belmont (12 miles).

Map showing Scots Guards position before the attack on Spur Hill

Red rectangle shows the objective – Red Arrow show the path the regiment followed for the attack

Belmont map 1

November 23rd: At 2 a.m. the battalion paraded and advanced to the rendezvous point at 3:15 a.m. The battalion launched its attack on Spur Hill, near Belmont at around 4 a.m.. Near the top, confronting a fierce Boers’ opposition they fixed bayonet for last push. Private John Campbell was severely wounded at both arms and on his side in that charge. During that particular attack the Scots Guard suffered many casualties 3 officers and 51 other ranks dead, 23 officers and 220 other ranks wounded.

Drawing showing Scots Guards assault on Spur Hill

XY2-1016860 - © - Classic Vision

He was sent back to United Kingdom and transferred to the 3rd battalion on January 17th, 1900

He was sent to South Africa and transferred to the 1st battalion on May 23rd.

He received his first Good Conduct Pay on March 18th 1901

He was back in United Kingdom on August 22nd 1902. Shortly after his arrival, he was transferred to the 3rd battalion (reserve) on September 9th.

He joined the Renfrewshire police on September 8th and he was stationed in Port Glasgow.

On January 5th, 1903 he was caught drunk on duty and was absent from the station from 7:20 am until 3 pm the next day. He was fined 2 days without pay.

He was part of a detachment sent to the City of Glasgow for the Royal visit in Scotland around May 14th. He would receive his King Edward VII Police (Scotland) Medal 1903 in March of 1904.

The Royal Proclamation for the Royal visit in Scotland

Glasgow proclamation

November 27th: He was caught drunk on duty a second time and this time he struck Sergeant McLean. He was dismissed the next day.

He reengaged with the Scots Guards on December 25th, 1905 to complete 16 years term.

On December 31st, 1907 he married Rosina McKellar in Glasgow. She was a servant and born in 1884. He was working with the Caledonian Railway Company as a railway brakeman

He was discharge from the army on December 24th, 1909

1911 Scotland Census: He was living with his wife at 116 Barclay Street in Paisley, Scotland. They had no kid.

World War One

He re-enlisted in the Scots Guards on July 2nd 1915. At the time he was living at 17 Barclay Street in Paisley, Scotland. Together with his wife Rosina, they had no children.

He entered France on October 7th and was transferred to the 2nd battalion on October 26th.

January 1916: The battalion spent the whole month near the villages Meville, they were shelled most of the day but this was very ineffective.

September 15th: Both battalions were part of a major attack that was not a success. It lasted until the 17th. They were sent to rest of the 18th. (2nd battalion 16 killed, 125 wounded and 28 missing)

The battalion launched a second attack to gain the missed objective of Leboeuf and Gueudecourt of September 15th, they suffered even more casualties 42 killed, 200 wounded and 88 missing

January-February 1917: No major fighting during that period but just a series of skirmishes and artillery bombardment.

March: The Germans retrieved their troops from the Hinderburgh Line and they provoked a series of small attacks from the British on their lines. Both Scots Guards regiment saw some fighting during that period.

June: Second Battle of Ypres

He was on leave to United Kingdom from July 9th 1917 to the 19th. He was then absent without permission from July 21st to the 23rd. He was fined with 3 days forfeit pay.

July 22nd: Germans launched a gas attack that continued until the 26th. On the 25th, Scots Guards launched their attack to raid the German lines. 6 killed. 28 wounded and 132 gassed

July 31st. Third Battle of Ypres. The 2nd battalion launched its attack at around 6:30 am, 38 minutes after 0 hours and suffered less casualties. He was wounded to the head by a gun shot. He was later admitted that day to the 47th Casualty Clearing Station. He was transferred to the 57th General hospital in Boulogne the next day and then to another hospital in Boulogne on August 9th.

October 8th: The 2nd battalion relieved the 1st and got into their position to lead next day’s attack. They are going to be relieved on the 13th.

November 24th: The battalion was sent to the lines for the Battle of Cambrai and take Bourlon Woods. They suffered many casualties but much less than their previous engagement.

November 30th: The Germans counter-attacked and both battalions were thrown back in the battle in order to stop the Germans advance. They were taken out of the lines on December 11th and had a quiet rest of December.

On February 9th, 1918, he was transferred to the 3rd battalion (reserve) and sent to England.

On March 6th, 1919, he was transferred back the 1st battalion and was discharged in London on June 11th.

He died on January 27th, 1932. He was struck by and engine of a railway train at Wallneuck Junction. He had a fracture skull, compound fractures and multiple injuries to the body. He was a foreman with a railway company

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Private George Charles Flynn

Private George Charles Flynn  served in the 1stbattalion of the Scots Guards Regiment during the Boers’ War. He is entitled to the Queen South Africa with clasps Belfast, Orange Free State, Cape Colony. He is also entilted to the King South Africa with the clasps South Africa 1901 and 1902.

He was born in June of 1876 in Cork, United Kingdom

Trade : seaman     Religion : Roman Catholic   Hair : brown

Height : 5′ 8″    Weight : 150 lbs         Eyes : grey

He is not listed in the 1881 United Kingdom census.

June 11th, Served as escort for the guns in the Diamond Hill attack

Private George Charles Flynn enlistment papers

October 16th, 1899: The 1st Battalion Scots Guards was inspected at Chelsea Barracks

May 23rd, 1900 : He left for South Africa with the regiment

April 29th,1901 : They arrived back in Bloemfontein

May 12th: The regiment entered Kronstad

May 31st: The regiment entered Johannesburg

June 5th : The regiment entered Pretoria

June 11th : The battalion served as escort for the guns in the Diamond Hill attack

August 4th : Entered Middleburg

August 26th : Battle of Belfast

July 10th, 1902 : The battalion entered Bloemfontein for garrison duty until the end of the war

September 9th : Left Bloemfontein for Cape Town. Embarked on the Winifridian on September 13th and arrived in Southampton on October th

October 6th : They received their Queen South Africa medal from the hands of His Royal Highness

February 4th, 1903: He received the King South Africa medal

May 10th, 1910 : He left the army

Typical Boers War medals pair

Private William Hancock

Private William Hancock served in the Army Hospital Corps. He is entitled to the South Africa medal 1877- 1879 with clasp 1879, the Egypt Medal with the clasp Tel-El-Kebir and the 1882 Khedive’s Star

He enlisted in the 100th Foot Regiment on August 7th 1873

He was transferred to the Army Hospital Corps on February 15th 1877

He was posted to the Cape on January 30th 1878

He was paid the General Depot at Pietermaritzburg from January 10th 1878 to November 30th of the same year.

He was posted to Utrecht

He received his pay via the 90th Light Infantry Regiment from November 1st 1878 until April 1st 1879

He served against the Zulus in 1879

He was back in United Kingdom on June 18th 1882 and served in Egypt in September of that year

He was discharged on August 6th 1885

Private William Hancock medals. His Egypt Medal is missing from the group. I would appreciate if anyone with information on the whereabouts of the medal could let me know.

William Hancock medals

Private John William Holland

Private John William Holland enlisted in the 2nd battalion of the Scots Guards Regiment. He is entitled to the India General Service Medal clasp Hazara and the Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal. His service number was 3060.

He was born in 1841

He started serving in the 19th Foot regiment in May of 1855 until May 1859 as a Boy in the regiment. He was 14.

May 9th, 1859 he enlisted in London as a private in the 19th Foot Regiment.

Hair : hazel         Eyes : brown      Height : 5’ 9”

He served in the East Indies from May 30th, 1859 until December 24th, 1871 (12 years and 4 months). During his posting in the East Indies he was hospitalized 14 times compare to only 4 times for the rest of his military career. Soldiers posted in station like the East Indies were much more subject to get ill because of living conditions much more difficult than in United Kingdom and also local disease.

Private John William Holland Medical records from his service file

June 10th, 1872: Deprived of two days’ pay for being absent without a leave

June 1st, 1873: he transferred to the Scots Fusiliers Guards Regiment.

September 1879: Discharged from the army. He served for 19 years and 148 days. On his Discharge paper his trade is musician so he was probably a bandsman with the regiment.

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Private John William Holland Long Service and Good Conduct Medal

Corporal John Easton

Corporal John Easton served in the 2nd battalion Scots Guards during the 1885 Egypt Campaign. He is entitled to theEgypt Medal clasp Suakin 1885

he was born October of 1849 in Glasgow, Scotland

Religion : Presbyterian          Trade : blacksmith     Height : 5′ 11″

Eyes : grey                   Hair: dark brown        Weight : 138 lbs

November 20th, 1869: He enlisted in the Scots Fusiliers Guards in Glasgow, Scotland.

Between March 17th, 1871 and August 11th 1874 he was imprisoned 11 times for the same motive; absence without a leave

September 30th, 1873: Hospitalized in Dublin for syphilis and again on September 1st, 1876 for the same disease but this time in London.

September 28th, 1879: Married to Alice Mattews

October 9th: Re-engaged to complete his 21 years

July 28th, 1882: Appointed Lance-Corporal and back to the rank of Private on January 24th, 1883.

July 6th: Hospitalized in Windsor for ulcer

July 27th, 1884: He was appointed Lance-Corporal a second time and he was appointed Corporal on July 25th.

February 21st, 1885: The battalion paraded at Wellington Barracks before embarking for Egypt

Suakin 3

March 9th: Posted to an outpost position near Suakin (nightly harassment)

May 8th: The battalion received their Khaki clothing (first time in the regiment)

May 16th: The battalion embarked for Alexandria

July 8th: They eft Egypt for Cyprus where they arrived on July 11th and were back home on September 11th

November 20th, 1888: Promoted to Lance-Sergeant

May 1st, 1889: He was promoted Sergeant

October 12th, 1891: He was permitted to continue in service beyond 21 years

He was discharged on June 22nd, 1892. He had served for 22 years and 215 days

September 22nd, 1927: He was still claiming a pension and it was revised for the last time on that day.

If you know additional information on this gentleman, please leave me a comment so I can add the information to his small biography.

Private George White

Private George White served in the Medical Staff Corps during the Egyptian Campaign. He is entitled to the undated Egypt Medal with the clasp The Nile 1884-85 and the Khedive’s star

Religion: Church of England     Trade: porter         Eyes: Hazel

Hair: light brown          Height:5’10”    Weight: 124 lbs.

He was born in Greenwich, London in November of 1864

He enlisted on January 15th 1884

From January 15th 1884 to November 4th he served at home (United Kingdom)

March 31st: He was appointed 2nd class Orderly

From November 5th 1884 to March 19th, 1887 he served in Egypt

From March 20th 1887 to January 14th 1896 he served at home (United Kingdom)

He was discharged in 1896 completing his 12 years short service period

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Egypt medal clasp The Nile 1884-85 and the Khedive’s Star

click on the image to enlarge

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Private White Attestation of Short Service page 1

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Private White Attestation of Short Service page 2

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Private John Neilson

Private John Neilson served with the 2nd battalion Scots Guards in Egypt in 1885. He is entitled to the Egypt Medal 1885 clasp Suakin and the Khedive’s Star.

He was born in 1864 in Cockpen, Midlothian, United Kingdom

He enlisted on June 4th 1883 in Edinburgh, Scotland in the Scots Guards

Height: 5’ 8”       Weight: 129 lbs.               Hair : Brown

Eyes: Hazel         Religion: Presbyterian

September 1st, 1884: he was appointed Lance-Corporal

February 21st, 1885: He paraded at Wellington Barracks before embarking for Egypt

March 9th : The regiment was posted to an outpost position near Suakin, They were harassed by the enemy during the night.

May 8th : He received his Khaki clothing. it was the first time the regiment used that color before that their tunic was the well-known scarlet red.

May 16th : The 2nd battalion Scots Guards regiment embarked for Alexandria

July 8th : He left Egypt for Cyprus where they arrived on July 11th. They stayed there until September 10th

September 11th : Back home. He was stationed in Dublin upon his arrival

November 10th: He was promoted Corporal

September 1886: He was stationed in London

February 3rd, 1887: Judge by a District Court Martial and reduced to the rank of Private for striking a soldier

October 10th, 1888: He was hospitalized for 193 days due to syphilis

May 30th, 1890: He was appointed Lance-Corporal

June 3rd, 1895: He left the army completing his 12 years for Short Service

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Private John Neilson’s medals (Obverse and reverse)

On the picture you clearly see that he wore his medals many times because of the damage done to the Egypt Medal(left) by the Khedive’s Star(right). This is the unfortunate result of the impact of the strong bronze made Star on the smoother silver made Egypt medal.

Private Lawson Crichton

Private Lawson Crichton served in the 1885 Egypt campaign at Suakin with 2nd battalion Scots Guards. He is entitled to the 1882 Egypt medal (clasp Suakin 1885) and the Khedive’s Star 1884-86. His enlistment number was 5361.

He was born October of 1861 in Glasgow, Scotland

1861 United Kingdom Census: Listed as living at 4 Dunlop Street in Kilmarnock, Ayrshire

Father : William Crichton     Mother : Agnes Crichton

He had one sister

1871 United Kingdom Census: Listed as living at 6 Robertson Place in Kilmarnock, Ayrshire

He had on sister and two brothers

1881 United Kingdom Census: Listed as living at 41 Robertson Place in Kilmarnock, Ayrshire

Trade : Coal miner

March 19th, 1883: Enlisted in the Scots Fusiliers Guards in Glasgow, Scotland.

Religion: Presbyterian        Trade : Engine man

Height: 5′ 10″     Weight : 163 lbs.      Eyes : blue      Hair: brown

August 1883: Hospitalized for gonorrhoea

April 1885: Hospitalized

February 21st, 1885: Paraded at Wellington Barracks before embarking for Egypt

March 9th: Posted to an outpost position near Suakin (nightly harassment)

May 8th: Received their Khaki clothing (first time in the regiment)

May 16th: Battalion embarked for Alexandria

July 8th: Left Egypt for Cyprus where they arrived on July 11th. They stayed there until September 10th

September 11th: Back home

October 1887: Hospitalized for gonorrhoea

1901 United Kingdom Census: Listed as living at 65 Canal St in Paisley, Renfrewshire

Trade: Cloth Finisher. He is married and have four children

Wife: Mary           Daughter : Mary, Agnes and Jane           Son : William

Served at home with the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders from March 31st, 1915 until March 24th, 1916 (not entitled to medals). His number was 4820

His WW1 Medal Index Card showing service only in United Kingdom

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Brigade-Surgeon Alfred Henry Anthonisz

Brigade-Surgeon Alfred Henry Anthonisz served in Egypt in 1882 and 1885, he also served during the Boers’ War. He is entitled to the Egypt medal clasp Suakin 1885, the Queen’s South Africa Medal clasp Cape Colony and the Khedive’s Star.

December 22nd, 1844: Born in Colombo, Sri Lanka. He was educated at Colombo Academy and Queen’s College. His parents were Gerard Henricius  Anthonisz and Abigail Elizabeth Wright.

1862: He went to the Calcutta to do his medical studies. After completing his schooling he entered the Ceylon Medical Service Department where he served for two years.

1867: Graduated M.B. and C.M. from the University of Aberdeen

November 11th, 1870: His name appears for the first time in the Medical Register

Between February 20th and 27th 1871: He passed his examination for admission in the Medical Service of the Royal Navy and then entered the army as Staff-Assistant-Surgeon. On April 1st he was sent to Bombay to be stationed there.

September 12th: Married to Cristian Joanna Sim.

September 19th: Appointed Staff-Assistant –Surgeon.

1873: Promoted Surgeon and posted to the 108th Foot Regiment. His first son Alfred George Henry was born that year and would later become a civil surgeon. He died when struck by lightning in South Africa in 1901.

1874: Birth of his daughter Eshel Maud

1876: Birth of his second daughter, Winnifred Maud

1878: Stationed in Bombay

July 19th, 1879: He was elected as a member of the Asiatic Society of Bombay

1880: Birth of his second son, Edward Guy also became a surgeon and served in WW1 with the British Forces

Egypt Campaign

September 1882: Served during the Egypt Campaign in the Tel-El-Kebir Campaign at the Fork Medical Depot. He was back in United Kingdom in December.

April 1st, 1883: Promoted Surgeon Major and stationed in Barbados

June 1885: He was attached to General Graham Force in Suakin in March. He came to United Kingdom in July arriving at Portsmouth on the Troopship Jumna. He was then posted to Devonport.

1888: He was stationed in Barbados

April 1890: Transferred from Bengal to Aldershot, United Kingdom. He took charge of the Third Station Hospital in Aldershot in June.

April 1st, 1891: Promoted Staff Lieutenant-Colonel

May 15th, 1895: Promoted Brigade-Surgeon (Lieutenant-Colonel)

August 21st, 1896: Appointed to officiate the Administrative Medical Staff of the Bengal Army with the temporary rank of Surgeon-Colonel. He was officially appointed in October. In November he is appointed to officiate as Principal Medical Officer in the Oude and Rohilkind District.

April 1897: Transferred from Bengal to Gosport

Boers’ War

October 6th: Arrived in Durban, South Africa onboard the transport ship Breamer Castle with the 1st General Hospital (From the London Times of October 5th). The hospital was later sent to Cape Town South, Africa where they arrived on October 27th. (From the official history book of the Royal Army Medical Corps). He was in charge of the medical function of the hospital that was then moved in Wynberg, South Africa and then opened on October 30th.

December 1899: Promoted to the rank of Colonel.

While in South Africa in the hospital was inspected by Mrs. Richard Chamberlain and he was accused of mismanagement of the hospital. This did create a commotion and it was found that Mrs. Chamberlain had no experience in hospital management so Colonel Anthonisz was later cleared of any wrong-doing

December 24th, 1900: He left South Africa for England onboard the Wakool. He is listed as invalids. (From the London Times of December 24th).

January 1901: He was sent back to Bombay. In June, he then served in India in the Bombay Command and was appointed Principal Medical Officer Secunderabad and Belgaum Districts. In September he was transferred from Bombay to Madras.

December 22nd, 1904: Placed on the Retired Pay

February 17th, 1905: He retired

December 6th, 1907: Departed from London, United Kingdom and sailed to Calcutta, India on board Jelunga with his wife.

October 27th, 1919: Died at Coonoor, Nilgiri Hills, South India.

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Picture of Brigade-Surgeon Alfred Henry Anthonisz  taken before his departure for South Africa.

 

Color Sergeant William Frederick George Glegg

Color Sergeant William Frederick George Glegg served in the 2nd battalion Scots Guards during the Boers War and with the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment after 1906 and during WW1 . He is entitled to the Queen South Africa Medal (clasps Witterbergen, Transvaal and Cape Colony), the King South Africa Medal (clasps South Africa 1901 and 1902) and the Army Long service and Good Conduct Medal. His enlistment number was 9868.

Born on April 1868 in Renfrew, England

Trade : solicitor      Religion : Presbyterian   Hair : auburn

Height : 5’10”          Weight : 142 lbs          Eyes : brown

1871 UK Census Listed as a scholar living with his parents in Kilbarchan, Renfrewshire

1881 UK Census : Listed as a scholar living with his parents in Kilbarchan, Renfrewshire

October 13th 1892 : Enlisted for short service in London, United Kingdom in the 2nd battalion Scots Guards

July 20th, 1893 : Appointed Lance-Corporal

November 1st, 1895 : Promoted Corporal

August 31st, 1896 : Appointed Lance-Sergeant

November 25th, 1897 : Promoted Sergeant

June 7th, 1899 : Married to Edith Bellitta Saunders (their address was 10 Robert road)

March 15th, 1900 : Embarked on the Britannic in Southampton, arrived at Port Elizabeth, South Africa on April 8th.

May 29th : The 2nd battalion covered the retreat of the Grenadiers Guards at Biddulphsberg

June 3rd : Arrived at Ticksburg and stayed there for a few days

August 5th : Reached Harrismith and stayed there until august 28th. For the next 6 weeks they did a lot of marching covering 492 miles by October 19 and back to Harrismith by October 30th :

November 20th : Left Harrismith to escort a convoy. Back on December 1st. Stayed there until mid-April 1902.

July 35th, 1902 : Assembled at Volksrust and left to Durban by train on September 11th. Because of a derailment they were delayed by a day and embarked on board Michigan on September 27th

October 27th: Arrived in Southampton, England and missed the Guard’s parade

October 28th : He received his Queen South Africa Medal

January 24th, 1903 : He received the King South Africa medal

King South Africa medals roll

January 12th, 1906 : Posted with the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment

April 20th, 1908 : Promoted to the rank of Colour-sergeant

January 1st 1911 : Recommended for his Long Service and Good conduct medal. UK Census taken in Preston : Listed as a Colour Sergeant and with the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment.

William Frederick George Glegg 1911 census

October 12th, 1913 : Discharged at Preston

April 7th, 1915 : Enlisted for service at home with Loyal North Lancashire Regiment the rank of colour sergeant no 20566.

June 2nd, 1918 : Promoted Warrant officer class II

March 13th, 1919 : Transferred in the Army of Occupation. He is not entitled to the British War medal meaning that he did not serve in France before November 11th, 1918. As a member of the Army of occupation, he was probably sent to France and Germany.

December 18th : Demobilized

April 24th 1924 : Died in Preston, Lancashire, England

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Private James Smith

Private James Smith (service number 5736) served in the 2nd battalion Scots Fusiliers Guards from 1856 to 1876. He did not served in any armed conflict or military campaign. He is entitled only to the Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal.

Born in April of 1834 in Glasgow , Scotland

Height : 5’ 8”             Hair : Dark brown

Eyes : Hazel              Trade : printer

April 4th, 1856: Enlisted in the 2nd Battalion Scots Fusiliers Guards

September 1858 : The 2nd battalion was stationed for a year in Dublin, Ireland

December 21st, 1861: Due to the Trent Affair (Fenians) in Canada, England decided to reinforce her military presence in Canada. The 2nd battalion Scots Fusiliers Guards left for Canada on the SS Parana (December 19th according to the official history of the regiment). They arrived in Sydney Harbour, Nova Scotia on January 6th. They then sailed to Halifax and then St-John New-Brunswick where they disembarked on January 19th.

On February 9th, they then took a sleigh ride from St-John to Rivière-du-loup, Quebec where they entrained and went to Montreal.

Drawing of the sleigh ride to Rivière-du-loup from the book The Scots Guards 1642-1914

They arrived in Montreal on February 11th and were billeted at Victoria’s Barrack.

October 10th, 1864: Him and the battalion were back in United Kingdom. He served abroad for almost 3 years.

Picture of Victoria’s Barrack in Montreal, Canada (1866)

April 4th, 1865: He reengaged for a period of 11 years.

May 23rd, 1876: He took his discharge from the Army. He served with the Scots Guards between the two major conflicts of the period (Crimea – Egypt 1882).

August 15th : He received his Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal. He is not entitled to any other medal.

Typical uniform for British soldiers in Canada 1865

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1891 Hazara campaign to Queen’s Own Corps of Guides Infantry

Some military campaigns have long been gone in history and are almost forgotten except for a clasp on a medal or a few paragraphs in an old dusty book. Those events happened in a way and in locations that makes today’s history only whisper about those events. Their battlefields were so in a remote area that today’s world of information can barely tell where it is. There was no glorious charge or Victoria Cross action to save the day but fear was amongst each men expecting the enemy. Men, advancing, rifles in their hands, not knowing if the next step would be their last. In those unsung campaigns there were also unsung heroes who were there to support the troops. The men of the Corps of Guides formed that type of unit, their role was to pave the way to the main force and they very often forgotten by history. In the Hazara campaign of 1891, the Queen’s Own Corps of Guides Infantry did what they were asked to do and did not seek any glory.

A few years back while looking at the catalog of a medals’ dealer my attention was caught by a medal to a Sepoy (private) to the Queen’s Own Corps of Guide. Although I did not knew much about the Corps of Guide, just the name Queen’s Own seemed interesting for research. The Internet being a good research tool for basic information I started my research there. After a few clics and words, I realized that my quest would need to take another path. Unable to get much information, I decided to settle for information on the Hazara campaign instead, same result, nothing.

Since the size of the Hazara campaign and the role that he unit played make information scarcer in a world of global information, I decided to turn my research to the another very important source of information, books. There I was able to find three books that do speak about the Hazara campaign and Guides, History of the Guides by Sir George Fletcher, Frontier and overseas : Expeditions from India volume 1 andThe story of the guides by Colonel G. J. Younghusband.

India General service medal 1854 – 1895 clasp Hazara 1891 to Guides

The Corps of Guides was created on  on December 14th 1846 because of the necessity of having a small force acquainted with localities, at the command of civil authority in a new country bordering troubled districts. Guides first saw action in 1847 and received their first campaign medal in 1869. On March 10th 1875, Queen Victoria gave them the distinction of being called Queen’s Own and the right to wear the Royal cypher within the Garter. The Corps is composed of eight companies, A company : Dogras (Kangra and Jammu), B company : Yasafzais and Riverine Akora Khattas, C company : Punjabi Musulmans and Cis-Indus (Narreb) Khattaks, D company : Afridis (Malikdin and Kambar Khel), E company : Gurkhans (Magar and Gurung), F company : Jat Sikhs (mixed), G company : mixed classes, H company : Jat Sikhs (mixed)

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The Hazara campaign is not the most prestigious campaign of the Victorian era, it is just a campaign where no glorious actionwas accomplished but only where everyone did their duty. It happened in an area of the planet that is very remote and even with today’s information web, it’s still very hard to find on a map. The region of the Black Mountains in Pakistan have been a troubled area for the British since the middle of the 19th century. Their first military expedition to reestablish the order in that area was lead in 1852; after that three others would follow, one in 1868, one in 1888 and the last one in 1891.

Origin of the campaign

In the fall of 1890 a British force led by Brigadier-General McQueen which was patrolling along the India border in the area of the Black Mountains had to turn back in front of an opposition from local tribes. The rebels refused to bow to the British Empire. As a response to that challenge in early 1891; British assembled a punishment force with the objective of

“assert the right to move along the crest of the Black mountains without molestation ; and next, and more particulary to inflict punishment on the tribes concerned for the hostility practised on that occasion” .

Guides infantry were called upon during that spring to be part of the Hazara force to re-establish law and order in the troubled region. The main force was assembled at Oghi and Darband by early march 1891. The total strength was of 7289 men and 15 guns.

Since the progression of the force would be done alongside the Indus river and from the experience gained of the 1888 expedition, the commander of the force, Major General W.K. Elles divided his group in two columns. Guides were assigned to the left column also known as the River Column which was commanded by Brigadier General R.F. Williamson. They were accompanied on their journey by the No 1 Mountain Battery, No 2 Deragat Mountain Battery, 2nd battalion Seaforth Highlanders, the Headquarters Wing 32nd Pioneers, 37 Bengal’s Infantry and 4th Sikhs. The other half of this force was the right column which was composed of those units ; No. 9 Mountain Battery Royal Artillery, 1st Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers, 11th Bengal Infantry , Wing 32nd Pioneers, 2nd Battalion 5th Gurkhas and Khyber Rifles.

The 1891 Hazara Campaign

The following description tells the events that happened for Guides during the Hazara campaign of 1891

March 4th : Guides left Mardan and completed the 30 miles trek to join the Hazara field force at Darband on March 9th. Due to bad weather the force would not be ready to move forward until March 12th.

March 12th : Guides moved out of Darband with the River column on that day at 8:30 a.m. and went to occupy Kotchai as their first action in this campaign. At night the River column bivouacked at Taward and two companies of Guides went on the right bank of the river as an observation force.

March 13th : Two companies of Guides moved up to take fresh ground up to the village where shots were exchanged with the rebels. On that same morning a reconnoitring force composed of half a battalion of Seaforth Highlanders and half a battalion of Guides crossed the river on the right bank. They visited several villages and finally made the junction at Garhi with the other two companies of Guides which had camped on that side of the river the night before.

March 15 th : The force approached Palosi’s plain. During the night to the 16th, news were received that the Chief political officer of the rebels were on their way to meet the British. A little later during the night; information was received that rebels are anxious to submit.

March 19th Two companies of Guides are sent to Kawar to reinforce the contingent after fire shots.

March 20th : The River Column continues its march toward Tawara and Pirzada Bela. They took position into rebel claimed territory and British artillery fire shots at rebel’s position in the mountain near Bakrai and Makhranai.

March 21st : Marched from Pirzada Bela to Palosi and occupied Ril.

March 22nd : Column returned to Tilli.

March 23rd : As they were getting deeper in rebels’ territory, a wing of Guides is sent across the river to observe enemy movement and to act as a support force to the 4th Sikhs which has already crossed the river and established their position at a place called Bakrai. Guides joined the 4th Sikhs at 5:30 p.m. to drive the enemy out of the hills. In the presence of the Sikhs regiment,  the rebels had assembled more men in the hill overlooking Sikhs and Guides position. The British commander felt that they did not have the best tactical position on the ground and ordered a withdrawal of all troops. Guides and Sikhs crossed back the river.

March 24th : Troops left Tilli for Palosi.

March 25th : Troops advanced to Shal Nala and established their camp in Darbanai. The stalemate continued to rise, rebels kept arriving in the area. The British decided then to strengthen their forces in Darband in case of an attack.

End of April : Finally tribes decided they could not match British superiority in fire power and made their submission to the ruler. The last tribe submitted unconditionally to the British.

May 26th Both clans the Hassanzai and Akazai were given permission to re-occupy their land. They agreed on the term of the surrendering on May 29th.

June 9th Troops are ordered back to India except for a small force which stayed and remained as part of the occupation force in Oghi and Seri, on the crest of the Black mountain. Guides infantry returned to Mardan on June 23rd ending their task with this expedition.

Map of the Black Mountains area showing some of the Corps of Guides position during the campaign

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There was never an engagement of massive forces between the two belligerents, there was no heroic charge to retake a vital position. There were just two enemies looking at each other in the eye and watching who would make the first move. The number of casualties for the British force was 9 killed and 39 wounded. From the information I found, I am not able to tell if some of those casualties were to the Corps of Guides.

On those nights of March 1891 for a Guide like Ghour Khan who was right in the middle of that confrontation, it was war. For those men life was at stake on a wire that could have been easily broken. His participation in that campaign gave him the India General Service medal with the clasp 1891 Hazara.

India General Service Medal clasp Hazara 1891 to Sepoy Ghour Khan – Queen’s Own Corps of Guides

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Sergeant James Fitzgerald

Sergeant James Fitzgerald served in the Army Hospital Corps and the Medical Staff Corps during the South African campaign of 1877 and in the Egypt Campaign of 1885 in Suakin, Sudan. He is entitled to the South Africa 1877-79 Medal with no clasp, the Egypt 1882 Medal with the Suakin 1885 clasp, the Khedive’s Star and the Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal. His enlistment number is 3326.

Born in Kilkenny, Ireland on November 1857

Height : 5’6”       Eyes : blue        hair : black

Roman Catholic     marital status : single     Trade : Laborer

November 15th 1875 : Enlisted in Kilkenny Ireland in the 69th Brigade

James Fitzgerald enlistment paper (page 1)

James Fitzgerald enlistment paper (page 2)

May 13th, 1876 : Appointed lance-corporal

February 15th, 1877 : Transferred to the Army Hospital Corps but reverted to the rank of Private.

February 20th, 1879 : Arrived in South Africa

August 10th, 1881 : Appointed Lance-Corporal and 2nd Corporal on August 30th

December 5th : Left South Africa

July 9th, 1882 : Married Rebecca Grace

May 12th, 1883 : Promoted Corporal

January 1st, 1885 : Arrived in Egypt

April 1st : Left Egypt

October 26th, 1887 : Transferred to the Army medical Staff with the rank of Corporal

November 16th : Entitled to the Good Conduct Pay

February 1st, 1888 : Promoted to the rank of Sergeant

November 16th, 1891 : Entitled to the Good Conduct Pay

April 1st, 1894 : Received his Army Long Service and Good Conduct medal

June 23rd, 1895 : Promoted to the rank of 2nd Class Staff Sergeant

November 16th, 1896 : Discharged

If you know more information on this gentleman, please leave me message so I can add it to his small biography