Tag Archives: woman

Nursing Sister Beatrice Vidal – UPDATED

Nursing sister Beatrice H Vidal served with the Canadian Army Medical Corps during World War One. She is entitled to the British War Medal and Victory Medal.

She was born in Quebec City, Quebec on August 6th, 1874

She was the third wife of General Beaufort Henry Vidal. He died in March 2nd 1908. When the general son’s, Maurice Henry Vidal, enlisted at the end of September 1915, he gave her mother-in-law as his next-of-kin. Her address was 190 Cobourg, Ottawa, Ontario

She enlisted on April 16th, 1916 in Taplow, England

Height: 5′ 1″             Weight: 110 lbs.       Religion: Roman Catholic

Eyes: blue                  hair: fair

She gave her son-in-law, Maurice Henry Vidal, as her relation (not a next-of-kin). He was her deceased husband child. She was a Nursing Sister with the CAMC in Canada on enlistment.

To be home Sister on February 9th, 1916

Daughter: Madame J. A. LeRoyer, 78 Malborough, Ottawa, Ontario

She proceeded to France on March 3rd, 1917

She was posted with the 6th Canadian General Hospital on March 6th.

She was admitted at the 2nd Canadian Stationary Hospital (neurasthenia) in Abbeville on May 9th

She transferred to the 14th Canadian General Hospital on May 10th.

She returned to England on May 18th

She was admitted at the Q.A.I.M.N.S. Hospital (debility) 71 Vincent Square on May 19th.  She was discharged from hospital on May 26th.

Maurice Henry Vidal was killed on July 29th. He was serving with the Canadian Army Service Corps

She sailed from England on HMTS Justicia on September 13th. She disembarked on September 25th.

She was discharged on January 31st, 1918 (Medically unfit). Her medical reports from that period reveal that she was underweight and was not able to get back to her normal weight.

She died on September 15th, 1923 at St-Luke Hospital in Ottawa fo gastro-intestinal intoxication

Her British War Medal, Victory Medal, Memorial Plaque and Scroll were sent to her daughter on Malborough Avenue in Ottawa. No one is entitled to the Memorial Cross.

 

Memorial Plaque to Beatrice H Vidal

Memorial Plaque to Maurice Vidal

Matron Margaret Heggie Smith – UPDATED (photos)

Matron Margaret Heggie Smith served in the Boer’s War and WW1 with the Canadian Army Medical Corps. She is entitled to the Royal Red Cross 1st class with bar, Queen’s South Africa Medal with no clasp, 1914-15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal.

Her medals are at the Bytown Museum in Ottawa.

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She was born May 24th, 1872 in Ottawa, Ontario

She was the daughter of William Heggie Smith of Ottawa.

She studied nursing at the Blockley Hospital in Philadelphia.

She enlisted in the Canadian Army Medical Corps to serve with the 19th Canadian Stationary Hospital in Harrismith, South Africa during the Boers’ War.

She returned to Canada in late July 1902.

She enlisted a first time on September 25th, 1914. She stated her address as 193 Slater Street, Ottawa, Ontario.

She was 5’ 6” and her religion was Presbyterian

I do not know why but she enlisted a second time on July 6th, 1917 in Orpington, England with the Ontario Military Hospital. On the paper her rank is Matron.

She served for two years in France, and 4 more years as Matron of the Ontario Military Hospital in Orpington, Kent, England, which became the No. 16 Canadian Field Hospital in 1917.

Photos of Margaret Smith in France

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She was back in Canada in 1919

July 31st, 1919 : In recognition of her exceptional service, King George V awarded a bar to her her the Royal Red Cross. For the link of her award in the London Gazette click hereSmith LG

She died aged 47 on May 12th, 1920 in Atlantic City. Her funeral service at St. Andrew’s Church in Ottawa and conducted by the Reverend George Fitzpatrick. It was attended by a large number of military officers. Obituary from The Canadian nurse and hospital review : “But years of steady and strenuous duty had its undermining effect, and it was in somewhat impaired health that Matron Smith returned to Canada. After some months’ treatment, she had seemingly recovered her health: and it was whilst in the enjoyment of a well-merited holiday, with friends, at Atlantic City, that, without warning, she was elected to join those “Whom God has called to His mysterious rest.”

She is buried at the Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa, Ontario

Picture of her gravestone

From The Canadian nurse and hospital review of January 1921 “The tablet, which is of handsome design, occupies a prominent place beneath the choir gallery and bears the following inscription: “In affectionate memory of Matron Margaret Heggie Smith, R.R.C., and Bar. Died 12th May, 1920. A Member of the C. A. M. C. Nursing Service since 1902. Served in the South African War and over five years in the Great War. This Tablet is erected by the members of the Overseas C. A. M. C. Nursing Service.

 Picture of the tablet in her honor at St-Andrew’s Church in Ottawa, Ontario

The ceremony throughout was most impressive. Rev. Mr. Kilpatrick referred feelingly to the life of service and sacrifice led by Matron Smith, and pointed out the relation of such a life to other lives dedicated to Christ. There were three points of contact: 1, the inspiration of love; 2, the swift recognition of need, human and divine; 3, a measureless sacrifice. These things, the preacher said, should call forth notes of thanks giving and pride, as in the old days, at an hour of sacrifice, they sounded the trumpets and sang the songs of the Lord. The memory of Matron Smith, Rev. Mr. Kilpatrick said, should lead to a high resolution to keep faith with those who died for the nation.
As the preacher delivered the words “To the glory of God and in pride and loving memory this tablet is now dedicated,” Mrs. Meighen pulled the cord and a thin silk Union Jack fell away and revealed the tablet. This was followed by a brief dedicatory prayer and the singing of the Doxology.”

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Nursing Sister Sadie Saint-Germain – UPDATED

This is the story of Nursing Sister Sadie St-Germain who I decided to revisit since I found some new and interesting information on her. Not listed on the Official list of WW1 casualties but her cause of death was linked to her war service on an official Canadian Government document (see below). This put the total of casualties to 63 Canadian nurses serving with the Canadian Army Medical Corps died of cause related to war.

Nursing Sister Sadie Saint-Germain served with the Canadian Army Medical Corps during World War One. She is entitled to the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

She was born on July 21st 1884 in Hull, Quebec

She enlisted on August 10th, 1916 in Kingston, Ontario

Her mother was Mrs St- Germain and living at 321 James Street in Ottawa, Ontario

Height : 5’ 5’’1/2      Weight : 107 lbs.    Religion : Baptist

She sailed from Canada on August 16th, 1916 on SS Ascania.

She was hospitalised for a bronchitis on January 3rd, 1917. Everything was back to normal on February 14th.

She was attached to the Kitchener Military Hospital in Brighton on March 8th.

She proceeded to France on September 18th. She was transferred to the 1st Canadian General Hospital on arrival.

She was posted with the 2nd Canadian Stationary Hospital on December 21st, 1918.

She was posted with the 10th Canadian General Hospital on February 18th, 1919.

She sailed from England on May 13th on SS Northland and arrived in Halifax on May 23rd.

She was demobilised on May 26th, 1919.

She died on May 3rd 1923 .Buried in Saint-James Cemetery in Hull, Quebec
Obituary from the Ottawa Citizen May 4th, 1923.
St – Germain – Passed away suddenly May 3rd 1923, nursing sister St-Germain Funeral private from brother residence 122 Cartier Street. Please omit flower.

Below is Nursing Sister Sadie St-Germain Certificate the cause of death. Her death was related to her war service but no Memorial Plaque or Memorial Cross were issued to her family. Her file is quiet about that. Her brother was still alive when she died so technically he should have received one but he did not. Why? History is silent about that

Germain cause of death

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Nursing Sister Sadie St-Germain gravestone in St-James Cemetery in Hull (now Gatineau)

stone-sadie-st-germain

Nursing Sister Jessie Nelson King

Nursing Sister Jessie Nelson King served with the Canadian Army Medical Corps during World War One. She is entitled to the British War Medal and Victory Medal.

She was born on June 8th, 1892 in North Vancouver, British Columbia

Height : 5′ 4″     Weight : 128 lbs.           Religion : Anglican

She graduated from the provincial Royal Jubilee Hospital in Victoria British, Columbia in 1916.

She enlisted on April 28th, 1917 in Victoria, British Columbia

She sailed from Canada o May 30th, 1917 and disembarked in England on June 14th.

Posted with the 9th Canadian Stationary Hospital on June 21st, 1917.

She was posted with the 12th Canadian General Hospital on October 12th and transferred to the 1st Canadian General Hospital on November 8th, 1917.

She was hospitalized at the 14th General Hospital in Wimereux for influenza on November 2nd, 1918.

hospitalized on March 5th, 1919 at the 14th Stationary Hospital (Dangerously ill, condition desparate)

On March 30th she was still dangerously ill (condition unchanged)

She died on April 4th, 1919 at the 14th Stationary Hospital in Boulogne at the age of 26 (cerebro spinal meningitis). She is buried in the British cemetery in Terlincthun, France XIV. A. 2.

Medals (British War Medal, Victory Medal), Memorial Plaque and Scroll and the Memorial Cross were sent to her mother Clara Amy King at 1246 Balmoral Road Victoria, British Columbia

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Picture of her gravestone

Nursing Sister Elizabeth Josephine McLoughlin

Nursing Sister Elizabeth Josephine McLoughlin served in the Queen Alexandria Imperial Nursing Service during World War One.

She died died on April 4th, 1927 and is buried in the military section of Mount-Royal Cemetery, Montreal

Obituary from Montreal Gazette April 5th, 1927

McLoughlin, Elizabeth Josephine

In this city, on April 4th, 1927, Elizabeth Josephine McLoughlin, nursing sister, Q.A.I.M.N.S. in her 40th year. Funeral from the William Wray Chapel 617 University Street on Wednesday April 6th 1927 at 7:45 am to Saint-Patrick thence Cote des Neiges Cemetery.

Nursing Sister Evelyn Verra McKay

Nursing Sister Evelyn Verra McKay served in the Canadian Army Medical Corps during WW1. She is entitled to the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. She was one of the few female casualties of war and a Memorial Cross, Memorial Plaque and Scroll were issued to her parents.

She was born on September 24th 1892 in Galt, Ontario.

Height : 5′ 9″     Weight: 160 lbs.        Religion:Presbyterian

She enlisted on November 6th, 1916 in London, Ontario.

Picture of Nursing Sister Evelyn Verra McKay (before the war)

Sailed to England on December 9th 1916 on board ship Missanabie. Arrived in London on December 19th.

She was transferred to the 3rd Canadian General Hospital, Boulogne on August 25th, 1917.

She entered the 3rd Canadian General Hospital (as a patient) on October 30th, 1918 (dangerously ill),

She died on November 4th from a broncho-pneumonia at the age of 26.

Her medals (British War Medal, Victory Medal)  and Memorial Cross were sent her mother, Sarah Mckay, 85 Rose street  in Galt, Ontario. The Memorial Plaque and Scroll were sent to her father Mark McKay.

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Picture of Nursing Sister Evelyn Verra McKay gravestone

Nursing Sister Sarah Ellen Garbutt

Nursing Sister Sarah Ellen Garbutt served in the Canadian Army Medical Corps during World War One. She served only in United Kingdom, so she is entitled only to the British War Medal.

She was born on May 14th, 1875

Religion : Methodist

She enlisted on April 3rd, 1917 in Kingston, Ontario.

She sailed from Halifax on May 29th and arrived in Liverpool, England on June 8th.

She was posted with the 16th Canadian General Hospital on arrival in uUnited Kingdom.

She was hospitalized at the Queen Alexandria Hospital (71 Saint Vincent) on June 27th, 1917.

She died from an abdomen cancer on August 20th, 1917 at the age of 42.

Her British War Medal was sent to her sister Esther Garbutt. Her Mémorial Plaque and Mémorial Scroll were sent to her brother Reverend John Garbutt 52 Simcoe Street, South Oshawa Ontario

No Memorial Cross issued since mother had preceded her.

She is buried at the Brookwood Military Cemetery, Surrey, United Kingdom, III. A. 15.

Picture of her gravestone

Matron Yvonne Beaudry (Baudry) A.R.R.C. – UPDATED

Matron Yvonne Baudry (Beaudry) served as a Matron in the Canadian Army Medical Corps during World War One. She is entitled to the Royal Red Cross 2nd class, the British War Medal, the Victory Medal and the Médailles des épidémies or (France)

In her military file, on all the documents, her name is spelled Baudry but there was an error done probably when she enlisted, her real name is Beaudry.

She was born in October 16th, 1875 in Beauharnois, Quebec

Trade: nurse Religion: Roman Catholic Status: Single

Height: 5′ 3″         Weight : 148 lbs.

Brother : Chambord Baudry      Address : 158 Cameron, Ottawa

1901 : Graduated from the Nursing School of the St-Luke Hospital in Ottawa, Ontario

From 1901 to 1907 : She served at the Stratchona Hospital (Ottawa Hospital), Hospital in the Scarlet Fever unit

from 1909 to 1914: She was the Head Nurse at the Grosse-Ile quarantine station, Quebec. The Grosse-Ile island was the quarantine station for all the immigrants travelling to Québec City which was a major port of entry to Canada at the time

She had to manage a team of 12 nurses and on average, 900 immigrants were hospitalized at Grosse-Ile every year

Picture of Head Nurse, Yvonne Baudry (On the left) taken at Grosse-Ile

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Picture of the nurses’ residence at the Grosse-Ile quarantine station. The house was built in 1912

Grosse-Ile Maison infirmière 1912

Pictures of the Grosse-Ile cross that were taken 103 years apart

1910 (year of erection)

2013

Cross 2013

November 8th, 1915 : She enlisted in the 6 th Canadian General Hospital in Montreal, Quebec

January 15th, 1916 : She left Canada with a group of 25 Nursing Sisters. She was taken on strength with the Canadian Army medical Corps on January 25th.

February 22nd : She was posted at the Westcliff Canadian Eyes and Ears Hospital, Folkestone

She was on leave from July 15th to July 28th

August 1st : She proceeded overseas with the 8th Canadian General Hospital. Transferred to the 6th Canadian General Hospital on August 4th. She joined the hospital in Joinville-le-Pont, France.

According to the biography of Margaret McDonald, the Matron-in-Chief of the Canadian Army Medical Corps, Matron Beaudry was sent to the 8th Canadian General Hospital to coach the matron who was experiencing some managing problems with the hospital. The Matron of the 8th Canadian General Hospital had not solved some problems raised by the Matron MacDonald during her spring inspection of the hospital, Matron Beaudry was sent to the rescue.

January 18th, 1917 : The hospital moved to Troyes.

June 21st : The hospital move back to Joinville-le-Pont

July 3rd : She was granted 14 days leave. Returned to the unit August 17th.

October 19th: She went to Joinville-le-Pont to rent some apartments for the Nursing Sisters

May 13th, 1918 : She proceeded to Rouen to see the new Nursing Sisters quarters. She was back with the unit on May 16th.

June 6th : She arrived from Troyes

June 29th : She and 4 Nursing Sisters proceeded to Rouen in honour of Dominion Day. In her file this leave is mark as a “3 days special leave

September 3rd : She was granted 14 days leave.

March 18th 1919 : She was granted 14 days leave.

to May 10th : The 6th Canadian General Hospital was disbanded

May 29th : She was transferred to the 14th Canadian General Hospital

July 3rd : She embarked on the Empress of Britain in Liverpool, United Kingdom. Arrived in Quebec City, Quebec on July 10th.

July 15th : She was discharged on that date and her proposed address was 158 Cameron Street, Ottawa

December 12th : She was awarded the Royal Red Cross 2nd class

July 9th, 1926 : She was awarded the French Médailles des épidémies or.

After discharge she served with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics from which she retired in 1939

1947 : She died after a long illness.

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Picture of Matron Yvonne Beaudry in her WW1 Matron uniform

The site of Grosse-île is now an historic site managed by Park Canada. Tourist can visit the park and guided tour are offered with guided and actors playing role of real person who were on the island. This picture below is one of actors who are playing the role of these real people, the actress of the left plays the role of head nurse Yvonne Beaudry.

Actors playing real nurse Yvonne Beaudry and 'Pit' Masson the ambulance guy - Picture of Berthier-sur-Mer, Quebec
This photo of Grosse-Ile is courtesy of TripAdvisor

Inspector Kate Galt and Jessie Robertson

Over the years I have been lucky with almost every research I did, I was able to find some information in almost every person I research except a few. Most of them are women, they are particularly difficult to research for two main reasons;

–        Many time even if they were participating at the war effort, women were part of civilian organisation and those did not kept any record on their service

–        After they involvement in the war effort many of those women married and changed their name, if you cannot find with whom they married, you lose their track right there.

It’s even more difficult if their name is common.

Here are two of those women for whom I was not able to find information.

Inspector Kate Galt served British Red Cross and Saint John of Jerusalem during WW1. She is entitled to theBritish War Medal and the Victory Medal.

Information taken from British Red Cross list 1914-18

Her rank was Inspector

Her Certificate number was 16487 and it was issued after august 1917

Her Passport Reference was 186094

and the Department she worked at is listed as “Canadian”, meaning she probably worked for the Canadians

Jessie Robertson served with Voluntary Aid Detachment during WW1. She is entitled to the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

Nursing Sister Nellie Grace Rogers

Nursing Sister Nellie Grace Rogers served as a Nursing Sister in the Canadian Army Medical Corps during WW1.

She was born on December 18th, 1889 in London, Canada.

Height: 5′ 5″     Weight : 115 lbs.           Religion : Baptist

She enlisted on November 11th, 1917 in Toronto but she only passed her medical exam on July 15th 1918 in Burlington.

She died on October 19th, 1918 from influenza in Toronto at the age of 28.

She never went to Europe. So her only medal entitlement is the British War Medal that was sent to her mother, Adelia Rogers in Listowel, Ontario with her Memorial Cross.

Her Memorial Plaque and Scroll were sent to her father, James Rogers

She is buried at the Listowel Cemetery, Ontario, Canada in lot 5. range 10.

Picture of Nursing Sister Nellie Grace Rogers gravestone

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Doctor Grace Winifred Pailthorpe

Doctor Grace Winifred Pailthorpe served with the French Red Cross during WW1. She is entitled to the British War and Victory Medals. What makes her story more interesting she was also an artist, a surrealist painter.

She was born in Sussex on July 29th, 1883

She trained for medicine, graduating as a M.B. and B.S. in 1914

1914-18 She served as Doctor with the French Red Cross and Scottish Women’s Hospitals, entering France in February 1915.

Her medals were sold at Dix Noonman in December 2012

1918-22 She worked as District Medical Officer in Western Australia

December 1921: She arrived in Vancouver, Canada on the Makura from Honolulu, Hawai

1922: She returned to England and took up the study of Psychological Medicine. She received her M.D. from the University of Durham in 1925.

1930: Her exhibits in the main Surrealist exhibitions and in 1938 publishes The Scientific Aspect of Surrealism which was probably instrumental in her expulsion from the group in 1940

1932 She published two books What we put in prison and in preventive and rescue homes and Studies in the Psychology of Delinquency. This brought her brought her worldwide acclaim. Her study of delinquency and sets up the first institute in the world devoted to the scientific treatment of delinquency, later known as the Portman Clinic

1935: She met Reuben Mednikoff and together they embark on psychological art research. She began her research into automatic drawing and painting. In her article The scientific aspect of surrealism she argued that the final goals of surrealism and psychoanalysis were the same: the liberation of the individual. Through surrealist techniques unconscious fantasies could be set free and subsequently reintegrated with the conscious. They have been qualified as one of the strangest and eeriest couples in British art

In 1936 she took part in the International Surrealist Exhibition in London, where her work from a series titled The Ancestors was greatly admired by André Breton.

One of her painting done in 1937

During the Second World War, she and her husband lived in Vancouver, Canada, where she worked as a psychoanalyst.

July 29th, 1940: She arrived in Liverpool, England on the Britanic from New-York, United States

1941: In her paper Deflection of energy, as a result of birth trauma was published, in which she pleaded for greater attention to be paid to the trauma of birth in the analysis.

In 1947 she returned to England and practiced at the beginning of the 1950s as a psychoanalyst in London. In later years her painting turned to Eastern mysticism – to the detriment of surrealism, because she bequeathed her large collection of surrealist art to a yoga society, which burned it.

She initiated the establishment of the world’s first clinic for the psychological treatment of prison inmates. Soon after the Institute for the Scientific Treatment of Delinquency was formed – now known as the Portman Clinic.
from 1940 to 1971 She continued her painting and research in combination with Reuben Mednikoff until their deaths within six months of each other in 1971

She died in July 1971 at the age of 87 years.

Nursing Sister Bertha Evelyn McDonald,

Nursing Sister Bertha Evelyn McDonald served in the Canadian Army Medical Corps during WW1. She is not entitled to any military medal.

She was born on March 3rd, 1895 in Alexandria, Ontario

She was hospitalised at Laurentide Sanatorium in Sainte Agathe, Quebec from April 1st to April 30th, 1918.

Her enlistement papers show that she joined the CEF on September 18, 1918 in Montreal, Quebec.

Height: 5′ 4″             Weight:122 lbs.           Religion:Roman Catholic

Her address 112 Saint-Luc Street, Montreal, Quebec

She was declared medically unfit on January 6th, 1919 in Montreal, Quebec.

She was hospitalised for influenza at Montreal General Hospital in April 1919 following which was marked debility.

She was hospitalised at Sainte Anne de Bellevue Hospital from May 2nd to June 2nd, 1919.

She was hospitalised again at Sainte Anne de Bellevue Hospital from June 18th to June 27th, 1919.

She was declared medically unfit and demobilised on July 28th, 1919.

Because she never left Canada, she did not receive any military medal for her service

In two places in her WW1 file it is stated that her military service began near May 1917 but her certificate of service date her appointing as nursing sister as September 18th, 1918 but she was hospitalised in a military hospital before that date.

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Inscription on her gravestone

1917-1919 C.A.M.C. – SISTER – W.W.1

IN LOVING MEMORY OF BERTHA E. MACDONALD

DAUGHTER OF DR D. D. MACDONALD

AND

CATHERINE MACDONNELL SPOUSE OF CHARLES KERR

AND OF

SCOTT E. BIRD

BORN ALEXANDRIA MAY 3 1894

DIED – OTTAWA DEC 16 1973

MAY HER SOUL REST IN PEACE

BLESSED ARE THEY THAT PUT

THEIR TRUST IN HIM

PSALMS 2:12

Some WW2 Nursing Sisters gravesites near Ottawa, Ontario

On this day we celebrate V E Day (Victory Day in Europe) here are some pictures of gravestone of a few Canadian Nursing Sisters who served during WW2. Let’s not forget that Canadian women wore khaki and also served during that conflict.

Matron Donalda Maud Robertson

Obituary from the Ottawa Citizen Friday December 2nd 1949, page 58

Robertson, Donalda Maud – In Toronto Western Hospital, December 2, 1949. Donalda Maud Robertson, Reg. N. daughter of Mrs Robertson and late Donald Robertson of Maxville, Ont. Funeral at Maxville United Church Sunday, December 4 at 2 p.m.. She is buried at Maxville Cemetery, Ontario.

Nursing Sister Thelma Hilda Wallace

She was born in 1916 and she died on April 19 1988 and buried in Bellevue Cemetery in Aylmer, Quebec

Nursing Sister Patricia Hession

She was born in 1921 and she died in 1993. She is buried in Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa, Ontario.

Nursing Sister Mary G Mitchell

She died April 27th 1946 and she is buried in Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa, Ontario.

Nursing Sister Margaret Andrew (née Irvine)

She was born on July 19th 1911 and she died on January 9th 2007. She is buried in Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa, Ontario.

Nursing Sister Dorothy M Hunter

She was born in 1919 and died in 2004. She is buried in Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa, Ontario.

Nursing Sister Clarice Lilian Tanner (née Ogden)

She was born January 29th 1915 and died February 8th 1992. She is buried in Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa, Ontario.

Nursing Sister Miriam Eastman Baker

Nursing Sister Miriam Eastman Baker served as a Nursing Sister in the Canadian Army Medical Corps during WW1. She is entitled to the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

She was born on August 20th, 1886 in London, England.

Height:5′ 5″     Weight:136 lbs.          Religion:Church of England

She graduated from Saint-Rubis Hospital, New-York in 1915

She enlisted in Winnipeg, Canada on October 2nd, 1917.

She was posted at the 16th Canadian General Hospital on November 1st. She was posted at the 15th Canadian General Hospital on March 14th, 1918.

She was admitted to the 15th Canadian General Hospital on August 22nd.(inflammation of the bladder)

She was discharged from the 15th Canadian General Hospital on September 3rd.

She was admitted at the 15th Canadian General Hospital on October 3rd.

She died on October 17 th, 1918 from a broncho-pneumonia at the 15th Canadian General Hospital at the age of 32.

Her Memorial Plaque and Memorial Scroll were sent to her brother Edwin Godfrey Phills Baker living at 500 Northern Crown Bldg, Winnipeg, Manitoba. Her British War Medal and Victory Medal were sent to her sister, Miss Doris Howard Baker, at 119 Wielmot Place Winnipeg, Manitoba Since her mother had preceeded her no Memorial Cross was issued.

Picture of Nursing Sister Miriam Eastman Baker

Nursing Member Margaret Louise Sampson

Margaret Louise Sampson # C 801 served with the #231 Nursing Division, St Catharines, Ontario with the St-John Ambulance of Canada. She received the The Most Venerable Order of St. John of Jerusalem , Officer Sister’s Badge and the St. John Service Medal, with 1 gilded clasp

She was born on May 16th 1913 in St-Catherine, Ontario

She joined St. John Ambulance Brigade in 1944 as a Nursing Member, Divisional Officer and Divisional Superintendent with #231 Nursing Division, St Catharines.

1956 : She received the St. John Service Medal for 12 years service with the St-John Ambulance of Canada.

February 8th, 1957 : She received a Priory Vote of Thanks for Valuable assistance rendered in the furtherance of the work of the Order in connection with the Priory of Canada.

1960 : She was promoted to the rank of Corps Staff Officer (Secretary) with the Lincoln Corps. She held this position until her death.

1961 : She received her first long service clasp for 17 years of service with the Ambulance.

1966 : She received her second long service clasp for 22 years of service with the Ambulance.

May 18th, 1969 : She had completed 25 years service and was rewarded by becoming a Serving Sister of the Order of St. John.

1971 : She received her third long service clasp (27 years).

1972 : She promoted to the rank of Officer Sister with the Order of St-John

1976 : She received her gold clasp long service bar denoting 32 years of service

1980 : She died on that year and was still serving with the St-John Ambulance after 36 years.

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Her Serving Sister Promotion Certificate

Priory Vote of Thanks for Valuable assistance certificate